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United States Trade Canada

BUSINESS
November 17, 1993 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI and KARL SCHOENBERGER
After years of discussion, the U.S. Congress today takes the first step toward deciding the fate of the North American Free Trade Agreement. *The Basics: NAFTA would tie together the economies of the United States, Canada and Mexico by creating a common trading zone stretching from the Yukon to the Yucatan. However, because the United States and Canada have enjoyed a free-trade arrangement since 1989, NAFTA primarily affects trade between the United States and Mexico and Mexico and Canada.
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BUSINESS
November 11, 1993 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI and PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Tuesday night's debate between Vice President Al Gore and Texas billionaire Ross Perot threw off a lot of sparks that danced over the sensitive issues surrounding the proposed North American Free Trade Agreement. But amid the rhetoric and name calling, questions remain about how much light Gore and Perot managed to shed on the facts about the treaty, which would remove most trade barriers among the United States, Mexico and Canada.
BUSINESS
November 4, 1993 | MICHAEL ROSS and DONALD WOUTAT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Clinton Administration on Wednesday sent Congress legislation to implement the North American Free Trade Agreement after negotiating last-minute side deals with Mexico that supporters said should significantly enhance the pact's chances of congressional approval. While President Clinton conceded that he still lacks the votes to assure passage of the three-nation trade agreement, congressional allies predicted new support after the late-night agreement with Mexico on side deals to protect U.
NEWS
November 1, 1993 | JACK NELSON and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Despite signs of new support in the House of Representatives, the fate of the North American Free Trade Agreement hinges on two uncertain factors: a behind-the-scenes diplomatic struggle with Mexico and the insistence of the new Canadian leader that long-settled elements of the pact must be readdressed. Little more than two weeks before the House is scheduled to cast its pivotal vote on the trade pact with Mexico and Canada, the White House has launched what Sen. John B. Breaux (D-La.
BUSINESS
October 19, 1993 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL and JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
While ruling out renegotiation of the proposed North American Free Trade Agreement, two top U.S. officials said here Monday that unspecified "clarifications" are being contemplated to reassure opponents in the United States. "We're not going to go back and renegotiate this treaty. That's not going to happen," said Sen. Christopher J. Dodd (D-Conn.), a strong NAFTA supporter who met here Sunday with Mexican President Carlos Salinas de Gortari.
NEWS
October 1, 1993 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Breaking with his longtime labor allies, Rep. Howard L. Berman (D-Panorama City) gave a boost Thursday to the Clinton Administration's uphill effort to pass the North American Free Trade Agreement by endorsing the controversial pact. Berman, who had been heavily lobbied by both sides, rejected labor leaders' contention that phasing out trade barriers between the United States, Mexico and Canada over 10 years would send jobs flooding to Mexico.
NEWS
October 1, 1993 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two weeks after President Clinton began a public push for the three-way trade agreement among the United States, Mexico and Canada, the public is deeply split on the issue, according to a Times Mirror poll released Thursday. Among those paying closest attention to the debate over the North American Free Trade Agreement, both support and opposition fell slightly, while indecision over the agreement mounted.
BUSINESS
September 19, 1993 | JAMES FLANIGAN
The surprising thing about the opposition to the North American Free Trade Agreement is that it's so blatantly false--the Big Lie technique is being used, as former President Carter put it last week, "by a demagogue who is preying on the fears and the uncertainties of the American public."
BUSINESS
September 19, 1993 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The notice still taped to the glass front door of the sprawling sugar beet processing plant is blunt: "Effective Friday, Oct. 30, 1992 . . . applications for employment will no longer be accepted." It is last year's sign, posted after the plant--across the Red River of the North from this sleepy farm town--had completed hiring for the "fall campaign," when mounds of sugar beets the size of bloated softballs are cleaned, sliced, boiled and crystallized into processed sugar.
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