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United States Trade Chile

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BUSINESS
March 15, 1989 | BRUCE KEPPEL, Times Staff Writer
Stevedores in Los Angeles temporarily refused to unload a refrigerated freighter from Chile on Tuesday as dockworkers, fruit wholesalers, grocers and growers confronted the government's new warning against tainted fruit. The dockworkers relented later in the day after government inspectors declared the cargo safe for handling. The cargo was unloaded, but it remains detained at the Port of Los Angeles.
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BUSINESS
November 30, 2000 | Associated Press
President Clinton and Chilean President Ricardo Lagos, commenting from opposite coasts, said Wednesday their countries have initiated talks on a free trade agreement and agreed that formal negotiations should start as soon as possible. Lagos, on a U.S. tour to attract technology investment in his country, announced the talks during a lunchtime speech in the heart of Silicon Valley.
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BUSINESS
March 15, 1989 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
One afternoon nearly three years ago, in the midst of a nationwide Tylenol cyanide scare, Dr. Frank E. Young, commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, could hardly control his wrath over the idea that someone would tamper with products purchased by American consumers. "This kind of terrorism is just like a burglary," he told a reporter. "In this case, the burglar burglarizes our trust. I get angry that someone would do this to us as citizens."
BUSINESS
April 12, 1997 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton launched a public campaign Friday to press Congress to give him the tools he needs to build freer trade relationships with Latin American and Asian nations, stressing that America does not "need to be afraid of foreign trade." The president called on Congress to grant him authority to negotiate trade pacts that cannot be amended in the House or Senate, warning that the nation's competitive standing in world markets is at stake.
BUSINESS
August 27, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Chile Wants In on Free Trade Zone: U.S. Trade Representative Carla Anderson Hills said the Administration could take the first steps toward bringing Chile into the new North American Free Trade Agreement by the end of the year. But she said that even with such a quick effort to expand the pact reached by the United States, Canada and Mexico on Aug. 12, it might be two years before negotiations were completed and Chile added to the trade zone.
NEWS
May 10, 1992 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Patricio Aylwin says his No. 1 goal on a visit to the United States this week will be to get negotiations started as soon as possible for a U.S.-Chilean free-trade accord. Aylwin starts his visit today in Los Angeles. He will also make stops in San Diego and Dallas before arriving Tuesday evening in Washington.
NEWS
December 10, 1993 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After NAFTA it's our turn, Chileans insist. After Mexico, no Latin American country has campaigned harder than Chile for a free-trade pact with the United States. And now that the U.S. Congress has approved the inclusion of Mexico in the North American Free Trade Agreement, Chile is champing at the bit. Some advocates of an agreement with Chile argue that it should have been signed even before NAFTA.
BUSINESS
August 6, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Fruit Inspection Fee: Fifteen importers of Chilean fruit and vegetables sued Los Angeles County, the Board of Supervisors and the county agricultural commissioner, claiming that the companies are being charged an illegal mandatory inspection fee for some produce. The Los Angeles Superior Court case said the county last August approved an inspection fee of 3 1/2 cents per package on some imported fruits, nuts and vegetables to be sold in California.
BUSINESS
March 24, 1989 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
The government of Chile and the World Bank have pledged financial backing to compensate for losses that resulted from the Bush Administration's five-day ban on Chilean fruit, officials representing Chilean exporters and U.S. importers announced Thursday.
BUSINESS
March 18, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
The federal government's decision to temporarily ban imported Chilean fruit after the discovery of two cyanide-laced grapes was widely supported by the American public, according to a Times Poll. The survey asked 1,158 adults nationwide to evaluate the Food and Drug Administration's response to the tainted grapes found in a shipment in Philadelphia: Did it overreact or was the move a prudent exercise of caution? Sixty-eight percent of those questioned thought the government had acted prudently.
BUSINESS
December 8, 1995 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Trade Representative Mickey Kantor held out little hope Thursday that an agreement can be completed to bring Chile into the North American Free Trade Agreement in 1996. The key obstacle, Kantor said, is the difficulty of gaining from the U.S. Congress the crucial negotiating authority needed to expand the agreement with Mexico and Canada to include Chile.
BUSINESS
April 7, 1995
Fluor Daniel Inc., a subsidiary of Fluor Corp. in Irvine, said Thursday that it has been awarded a $97-million contract to design and build a gold heap leach facility in Santiago, Chile. Fluor Daniel's office in Santiago will provide project management services for the engineering, design, procurement and construction. The project is scheduled for completion in early 1996 and is expected to produce 233,000 ounces of gold per year.
NEWS
December 31, 1994 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The case of the "poisoned grapes" once again has Chileans bursting with pent-up wrath: Newly revealed evidence supports Chilean arguments that a 1989 poison scare, which resulted in a costly U.S. ban on Chilean fruit, was triggered by a hoax. In March, 1989, an anonymous caller told the U.S. Embassy in Santiago that Chilean fruit shipped to the United States had been poisoned.
NEWS
December 10, 1993 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After NAFTA it's our turn, Chileans insist. After Mexico, no Latin American country has campaigned harder than Chile for a free-trade pact with the United States. And now that the U.S. Congress has approved the inclusion of Mexico in the North American Free Trade Agreement, Chile is champing at the bit. Some advocates of an agreement with Chile argue that it should have been signed even before NAFTA.
BUSINESS
August 27, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Chile Wants In on Free Trade Zone: U.S. Trade Representative Carla Anderson Hills said the Administration could take the first steps toward bringing Chile into the new North American Free Trade Agreement by the end of the year. But she said that even with such a quick effort to expand the pact reached by the United States, Canada and Mexico on Aug. 12, it might be two years before negotiations were completed and Chile added to the trade zone.
NEWS
May 10, 1992 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Patricio Aylwin says his No. 1 goal on a visit to the United States this week will be to get negotiations started as soon as possible for a U.S.-Chilean free-trade accord. Aylwin starts his visit today in Los Angeles. He will also make stops in San Diego and Dallas before arriving Tuesday evening in Washington.
NEWS
March 31, 1989
Chilean police said that two cyanide-tainted grapes that prompted a five-day U.S. embargo on Chilean fruit were poisoned en route to or in the United States but not in Chile. Gen. Fernando Paredes, investigative police chief, said preliminary results of laboratory tests showed that grapes injected with cyanide in Chile would have rotted before reaching the United States. Authorities said full testing would take about a month. The U.S.
NEWS
March 17, 1989 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
U.S. and Chilean officials working to resolve the Chilean fruit crisis indicated Thursday that they are nearing an agreement on a plan to protect the safety of future imports from that nation. But they said that they remain stymied over what to do with all the produce that has arrived here since the discovery of two poisoned grapes earlier this week.
BUSINESS
September 12, 1991 | Anne Michaud
An association of avocado growers and shippers from Chile has agreed to chip in for an advertising campaign to promote the fruit, according to the Santa Ana-based California Avocado Commission. Together, avocado growers from both countries plan to pitch the fruit as a year-round delicacy. Chile sends avocados to the United States when the fruit is out of season here.
BUSINESS
August 6, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Fruit Inspection Fee: Fifteen importers of Chilean fruit and vegetables sued Los Angeles County, the Board of Supervisors and the county agricultural commissioner, claiming that the companies are being charged an illegal mandatory inspection fee for some produce. The Los Angeles Superior Court case said the county last August approved an inspection fee of 3 1/2 cents per package on some imported fruits, nuts and vegetables to be sold in California.
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