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United States Trade China

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NEWS
September 22, 1996 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Barbie doll is for sale at the Anaheim Toys "R" Us store in a bright cardboard-and-cellophane box labeled "Made in China." The price is $9.99. But how much will China make from the sale of the pert fashion doll marketed around the world by Mattel Inc. of El Segundo? About 35 cents, according to executives in the Asian and American toy industry--mostly in wages paid to 11,000 young peasant women working in two factories across the border from Hong Kong in China's Guangdong province.
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BUSINESS
September 30, 2001 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Zhang Jiazhen, director of Shanghai People's Printing Factory No. 8, already had laid off 400 people, one-third of his payroll, and spent $20 million upgrading his 68-year-old factory, the city's third-largest. Despite the actions, unusual in China, Zhang found himself facing a manager's dilemma of too little cash and expertise to prepare for China's entry into the World Trade Organization. So he turned to a Western company, Avery Dennison Corp.
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BUSINESS
April 9, 1999 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Contrary to the upbeat White House commentary, the failure of U.S. and Chinese negotiators to bring China into the global trading system this week threatens to doom China's prospects for entering the World Trade Organization this year. Chinese negotiators don't want to jeopardize their fragile financial system or the economic health of such key sectors as textiles. Their U.S. counterparts are mindful that a deal could face an array of political opponents.
BUSINESS
September 18, 2001 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James Lee strolled the aisles of the Wal-Mart Supercenter, passing Korean televisions, Chinese packaged noodles and a glistening seafood display overflowing with such fresh fish as two whole sharks. He was on a quest for "Made in the USA" labels. Lee stopped for a moment, then brightened. "Sunkist oranges," he said triumphantly. And there was more: "Act II popcorn. I'm helping develop a market for that in China. I think it could be very popular."
NEWS
April 10, 1992 | JURA KONCIUS, THE WASHINGTON POST
"It is like sending an icon to be mass produced," says Virginia Gunn, a quilt historian. "The Smithsonian should be above those things." "This was a one-of-a-kind piece," says Hazel Carter, a quilting expert. "If it weren't the Smithsonian, we wouldn't be so upset. They are supposed to be guarding our American treasures." The Great Quilt Debate is on.
NEWS
June 30, 1991 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In its current, determined effort to persuade Congress to extend U.S. trade benefits for China, the Bush Administration has argued repeatedly that the United States maintains most of the sanctions that it imposed upon the Chinese regime two years ago. "We continue today to impose most of the sanctions we began in the wake of the Tian An Men massacre," Deputy Secretary of State Lawrence S. Eagleburger recently told Congress.
NEWS
June 2, 1998 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Snowballing anti-China sentiment on Capitol Hill could deal a death blow to an industrial development project that supporters say would create hundreds of jobs for U.S. workers at the Port of Long Beach. In coming days, the Senate will debate a legislative proposal that would bar Cosco, a shipping company owned by the Chinese government, from leasing a significant portion of what was once the Long Beach Naval Station. The prohibition already has been adopted by the House.
BUSINESS
February 3, 1997 | From Reuters
President Clinton's top trade negotiator said Sunday that a newly signed textile pact with China laid the basis for expanded bilateral textile trade. "This is a solid agreement that meets our critical objectives," U.S. Trade Representative-designate Charlene Barshefsky said in a statement. China and the U.S. signed the agreement in Beijing earlier in the day in an eleventh-hour deal that ended the threat of a transpacific trade war and was hailed by both sides as a breakthrough.
BUSINESS
October 17, 1999 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Chinese have landed here to a warm welcome. But just to be on the safe side, Dave McMahen decided not to fly the Chinese flag outside the motor scooter factory. After surviving for decades on the fortunes of poultry, Russellville, population 21,000, is now the unlikely home of what appears to be mainland China's first U.S. factory built from the ground up.
BUSINESS
January 25, 1993 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was one of the regular staples of President Clinton's campaign for the White House: attacking the Bush Administration for "coddling the dictators of Beijing." Along with that denunciation came Clinton's oft-proclaimed endorsement of congressional efforts to make the annual extensions of China's trade benefits in this country conditional on improvements in Beijing's human rights, trade and arms-export policies.
BUSINESS
August 30, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a government undercover agent playing the role of a nervous arms dealer, the Customs Service arrested two U.S.-based businessmen--including the owner of a Compton freight company--on suspicion of conspiring to smuggle high-tech military code devices to China, the agency said Wednesday.
BUSINESS
August 8, 2001 | Bloomberg News
The Chinese government sent a team to the U.S. to buy Boeing Co. aircraft, one week after officials said the country would accelerate plans to purchase planes. The officials plan to buy about $2 billion worth of Boeing planes on their trip, said Wang Zhezhao, a spokesman for Shandong Airlines Co. Shandong Air has plans to buy two Boeing 737s of its own through a share sale in China.
BUSINESS
August 5, 2001 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It should have been Qualcomm Inc.'s time for celebration. One of China's leading telecom firms recently signed $1.5 billion in contracts for equipment using the San Diego firm's wireless standard. That move by China Unicom is the most positive sign yet that Qualcomm's code division multiple access technology--known as CDMA--has a profitable future in China, which has an exploding mobile phone market now dominated by Europe's competing GSM system. The current success has been a long time coming.
NEWS
June 6, 2001 | CHING-CHING NI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new U.S. trade representative met here Tuesday with his Chinese counterpart for the first time, raising hopes that both sides were ready to accelerate China's entry into the World Trade Organization. But no breakthrough came after initial talks between Robert B. Zoellick, the highest-ranking Bush administration official to visit China, and Foreign Trade Minister Shi Guangsheng.
NEWS
June 4, 2001 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three years ago, Republicans in Congress launched a ferocious attack on President Clinton for approving the export of satellites to China in a way they said harmed America's security. Now, with a Republican in the White House and a satellite industry complaining of lost business, Washington is singing a different tune. Amid the furor of the late 1990s, the Republican Congress enacted legislation making it harder for companies to win government approval of satellite exports.
NEWS
June 2, 2001 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush on Friday said that extending normal trade relations with China for another year would signal U.S. desire to help the Chinese join the international trading system, boost economic development and gain greater freedom. The president sent the China trade measure to Congress on Friday, moving to keep relations with Beijing on an even keel. He had announced his decision to extend the trade provision in a speech Tuesday in Los Angeles. Rep.
NEWS
April 27, 1993 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Chris Patten said Monday that during his scheduled visit to Washington next week, he will plunge into the U.S. debate over policy toward China by lobbying personally for preservation of normal Sino-U.S. trade ties. Any action by Washington to end China's most-favored-nation trade status would not only cause economic damage to the United States, China and Hong Kong but would also harm efforts to promote political liberalization in China, Patten told a group of U.S. reporters here.
NEWS
April 10, 1999 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Showing obvious pique about a summit gone awry, Chinese Premier Zhu Rongji on Friday sharply criticized President Clinton for refusing to approve a proposed deal aimed at bringing China into a global trading regime.
NEWS
May 1, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Chinese government intensified religious persecution after Congress awarded it permanent normal trade status last year, apparently because Beijing concluded that the United States is not serious about advocating tolerance, a high-level U.S. commission said Monday. "There has been a significant deterioration in religious freedom since [normal trade status] was voted," said Elliott Abrams, chairman of the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom.
NEWS
April 11, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT and HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Three decades after the Bamboo Curtain came down, China and the United States have gradually grown together in ways that not even the standoff over an American spy plane can easily rend asunder. The Bush administration has warned almost daily about the risks China is taking by detaining the plane's 24-member crew. "Every day that goes by increases the potential that our relations with China could be damaged," the president said Monday.
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