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December 5, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the tanker Catalina, this week-long journey is to be routine: south from Houston across the Gulf of Mexico, a squeeze through the Yucatan Channel then a dash for home across the Caribbean to this steamy Colombian port. Nothing unusual about the cargo, either. Among the shipments sloshing in her holds will be close to a million pounds of methyl ethyl ketone, direct from Exxon Chemical. It is an ordinary solvent, best-suited for producing rubber cement.
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NEWS
February 25, 2001 | From Associated Press
Colombian President Andres Pastrana arrived Saturday for a four-day visit to the United States, during which he will seek trade agreements to revive his country's ailing economy and might ask for more money to buttress his U.S.-backed drug war. Pastrana's trip will include a visit with President Bush and talks with U.S. congressional leaders, governors and trade representatives, according to the presidential palace.
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NEWS
February 25, 2001 | From Associated Press
Colombian President Andres Pastrana arrived Saturday for a four-day visit to the United States, during which he will seek trade agreements to revive his country's ailing economy and might ask for more money to buttress his U.S.-backed drug war. Pastrana's trip will include a visit with President Bush and talks with U.S. congressional leaders, governors and trade representatives, according to the presidential palace.
BUSINESS
January 11, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Costa Rica, Colombia Avoid U.S. Sanctions: U.S. Trade Representative Mickey Kantor announced that after a year of talks, Costa Rica and Colombia have signed agreements pledging to cooperate in trying to get the 15-nation European Union to scrap trade barriers involving bananas. Those barriers have been attacked by U.S. banana-exporting companies, most notably Chiquita Brands International, which contend the European restrictions are costing hundreds of millions of dollars in lost sales for U.S.
BUSINESS
January 11, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Costa Rica, Colombia Avoid U.S. Sanctions: U.S. Trade Representative Mickey Kantor announced that after a year of talks, Costa Rica and Colombia have signed agreements pledging to cooperate in trying to get the 15-nation European Union to scrap trade barriers involving bananas. Those barriers have been attacked by U.S. banana-exporting companies, most notably Chiquita Brands International, which contend the European restrictions are costing hundreds of millions of dollars in lost sales for U.S.
NEWS
July 24, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Bush said he will ask Congress to approve special duty-free treatment of selected imports from four Andean nations as a step toward a "comprehensive free-trade zone for the Americas." Bush made the announcement after a meeting in Washington with Ecuadorean President Rodrigo Borja Cevallos. In addition to Ecuador, the preferential trade treatment would affect Colombia, Bolivia and Peru.
NEWS
February 26, 1991 | From Reuters
Colombia and the United States signed four agreements Monday to boost trade and improve anti-drug cooperation. The pacts came on the first day of a visit by President Cesar Gaviria. They include an agreement to share judicial evidence to expedite the judging of drug lords in Colombia. They also include a $41-million grant to help the drug fight and a joint effort to control production of chemicals used in cocaine processing.
NEWS
March 2, 1995 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Wednesday spared Colombia from American sanctions against governments implicated in narcotics trade, despite what officials called "pervasive corruption" of the South American nation's political and judicial systems by cocaine cartels. In his annual report to Congress, Clinton said Colombia's anti-drug effort fell far short of what is required, but he waived economic penalties set by American law because he concluded that it is in the U.S.
NEWS
July 6, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A fourfold increase in West German exports to Colombia of chemical solvents used in producing cocaine has provoked deep concern within the Bush Administration about a rapidly emerging European role in fueling Latin American drug production, according to senior U.S. officials. The sudden surge establishes West Germany as the leading source of the solvents and has more than filled a void created when new U.S.
NEWS
March 2, 1995 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Wednesday spared Colombia from American sanctions against governments implicated in narcotics trade, despite what officials called "pervasive corruption" of the South American nation's political and judicial systems by cocaine cartels. In his annual report to Congress, Clinton said Colombia's anti-drug effort fell far short of what is required, but he waived economic penalties set by American law because he concluded that it is in the U.S.
BUSINESS
January 28, 1995 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's recent downpours have sent rivulets coursing through fields of gladioluses, baby's breath and larkspur. And January's heavy dose of leaden skies has raised growers' concern that many shoots will fail to evolve into rose blooms for love-struck Lotharios to send on Valentine's Day.
BUSINESS
December 5, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Latin Trade Conference: "Inside the Americas: A Report on Mexico, Colombia and Brazil" will take place today and Tuesday starting at 8 a.m. at the Institute of the Americas Conference Center on the UC San Diego campus. The conference is designed to give Southern California business people fresh updates and insights into the commercial and trade environments in three countries that have each recently elected new presidents.
BUSINESS
October 20, 1994 | STEVEN AMBRUS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
This nation's $100-million-a-year rose industry has been imperiled by a recent American anti-dumping ruling in favor of U.S. growers, Colombian industry representatives say. Colombian growers, who send an estimated 90% of their production to the American market, say a tentative decision last month by the U.S. Commerce Department could force them to hold back 50% of their rose exports over the next three months and could cost Colombians about 50,000 jobs.
NEWS
February 26, 1991 | From Reuters
Colombia and the United States signed four agreements Monday to boost trade and improve anti-drug cooperation. The pacts came on the first day of a visit by President Cesar Gaviria. They include an agreement to share judicial evidence to expedite the judging of drug lords in Colombia. They also include a $41-million grant to help the drug fight and a joint effort to control production of chemicals used in cocaine processing.
NEWS
July 24, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Bush said he will ask Congress to approve special duty-free treatment of selected imports from four Andean nations as a step toward a "comprehensive free-trade zone for the Americas." Bush made the announcement after a meeting in Washington with Ecuadorean President Rodrigo Borja Cevallos. In addition to Ecuador, the preferential trade treatment would affect Colombia, Bolivia and Peru.
BUSINESS
May 31, 1990 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President-elect Cesar Gaviria is asking the United States for a more cooperative policy toward Colombian exports as a way of supporting this country's costly fight against cocaine traffic. Gaviria, a member of the governing Liberal Party, was elected Sunday and will take office Aug. 7. In a victory speech, he said his government will need more than "rhetorical support" from cocaine-consuming countries against violent traffickers.
NEWS
November 2, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush unveiled a new package of trade initiatives Wednesday designed to boost the domestic economies and lift the flagging spirits of the Andean nations that are attempting to crack down on narcotics trafficking. The bid to increase trade between the United States and the region grew out of a pledge that the President made last month to visiting Colombian President Virgilio Barco Vargas, whose own "all-out war" against drug traffickers has met with waning public support.
NEWS
July 14, 1990 | From Associated Press
Colombia's President-elect Cesar Gaviria said Friday that the United States must curb its appetite for drugs before his nation can significantly stem illegal cocaine production. Gaviria told reporters after meeting with President Bush that "the demand for drugs is the engine of the trafficking problem. If the United States and the industrial countries don't get a way to reduce consumption, we will not solve the problem.
NEWS
July 6, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A fourfold increase in West German exports to Colombia of chemical solvents used in producing cocaine has provoked deep concern within the Bush Administration about a rapidly emerging European role in fueling Latin American drug production, according to senior U.S. officials. The sudden surge establishes West Germany as the leading source of the solvents and has more than filled a void created when new U.S.
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