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United States Trade Commonwealth Of Independent States

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BUSINESS
January 1, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Former Republics Seen as Major Customers: The former Soviet republics can eventually be "more important markets" for U.S. farmers than the old U.S.S.R., America's longtime No. 1 grain customer, Agriculture Secretary Edward Madigan said. The department said the former republics can now apply individually for export credit guarantees and export subsidies originally offered to the Soviet Union.
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BUSINESS
April 2, 1992 | JONATHAN PETERSON and ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush's proposed $6.6-billion plan to aid the former Soviet Union comes at a time when the once-bright promise of East-West business contacts has been darkened by persistent, chaotic conditions in Russia and its neighboring republics, Soviet specialists said Wednesday.
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BUSINESS
January 5, 1992 | From Associated Press
You don't have to go to a former Soviet republic to hear grumbling about the rising price of bread. Just head to the local supermarket. The biggest bakers in the United States have raised their prices because of sharply higher costs for wheat, the main ingredient of just about every kind of bread. Prices are going up between 5 and 10 cents a loaf, industry estimates show. In what might seem like an ironic twist, the higher U.S.
BUSINESS
January 5, 1992 | From Associated Press
You don't have to go to a former Soviet republic to hear grumbling about the rising price of bread. Just head to the local supermarket. The biggest bakers in the United States have raised their prices because of sharply higher costs for wheat, the main ingredient of just about every kind of bread. Prices are going up between 5 and 10 cents a loaf, industry estimates show. In what might seem like an ironic twist, the higher U.S.
BUSINESS
April 2, 1992 | JONATHAN PETERSON and ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush's proposed $6.6-billion plan to aid the former Soviet Union comes at a time when the once-bright promise of East-West business contacts has been darkened by persistent, chaotic conditions in Russia and its neighboring republics, Soviet specialists said Wednesday.
BUSINESS
January 1, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Former Republics Seen as Major Customers: The former Soviet republics can eventually be "more important markets" for U.S. farmers than the old U.S.S.R., America's longtime No. 1 grain customer, Agriculture Secretary Edward Madigan said. The department said the former republics can now apply individually for export credit guarantees and export subsidies originally offered to the Soviet Union.
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