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United States Trade Europe

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BUSINESS
August 25, 1988 | From Reuters
Sharp Corp., saying it is cheaper to make some products in the United States than in Japan, announced Wednesday that it will begin exporting American-made microwave ovens to 11 European countries. The Japanese consumer products company said its U.S. subsidiary, Sharp Electronics, will ship about 60,000 ovens to Europe during the next few months. By the end of next year, the unit is expected to have shipped to Europe 100,000 ovens worth about $12 million. Each oven is 0.6 cubic feet in size.
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BUSINESS
November 10, 2001 | WARREN VIETH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The World Trade Organization launched five days of high-level talks Friday by acknowledging the many conflicts dividing its members, but on the sidelines, the biggest players already were declaring their willingness to deal. Even before the conference's scripted opening ceremony, U.S. and European officials hinted at possible concessions on agricultural subsidies and other sensitive issues to get Third World support for a new round of talks to liberalize global trade.
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BUSINESS
September 11, 1994 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Few places on Earth have been described in such rich statistical detail. But then, the Pacific Rim is an idea in search of a definition, and it needs something tangible to glue it together. That's why anyone with a stomach for numbers can discover the growth rate of its aggregate GNP, the output in megawatts of its new power plants or the purchasing power of its emerging middle class. Memorize some of this minutia and you're a Pacific Rim expert.
BUSINESS
July 2, 2001 | MARTIN CRUTSINGER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Bush administration on Sunday formally lifted trade sanctions the United States had imposed on $191 million worth of French handbags, British bed linens and other European products in a fight over European banana barriers. U.S. Trade Representative Robert Zoellick said the administration was satisfied with the steps the European Union had taken to implement an agreement the two sides had reached April 11.
BUSINESS
December 2, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S., EU Aim to Drop All Tariffs on Information Technology: The United States and the European Union plan to negotiate the phase-out of tariffs on major information technology products by 2000 as part of their new trade initiative, U.S. industry and government officials said.
BUSINESS
January 10, 1989 | ART PINE, Times Staff Writer
The United States has begun preparing to fire another big salvo in its trade dispute with the European Community over Europe's move Jan. 1 barring imports of American beef from animals treated with growth-inducing hormones. In a move that could escalate the skirmish substantially, the Agriculture Department has sent a letter to major European governments questioning whether they have been maintaining proper standards in inspecting European meat that is being shipped to the United States.
BUSINESS
May 31, 1988 | From Reuters
Anheuser-Busch Cos. of the United States hopes it can soon solve a trademark problem with brewers in Czechoslovakia that stops it from selling its Budweiser beer in much of Europe, board member and Vice President Jerry Ritter said Monday. "We do have a trademark issue with the Czechoslovaks with regard of the use of the name Budweiser," Ritter said. The problem has arisen because a Czechoslovakian beer has that name. "We hope ultimately we will be able to use the name . . .
NEWS
December 3, 1990 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alexis Semaille, 28, represents the future of European farming. No wonder he's so glum. With his father and his wife, he works seven days a week growing sugar beets and pastry-grade wheat and raising 200 head of dairy and beef cattle. It's hard work, and Semaille needs a helping hand. The helping hand is stuffed with cash--$100 billion in subsidies for Semaille and other European farmers every year.
BUSINESS
July 19, 1998 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Europe. A continent stuck in the past, a sort of theme park for tourists with well-preserved castles and quaint customs, right? As for the economy, it must be about as exciting and dynamic as Poli-Grip. Flat wrong--that was then, and this is now. In mid-1998, as much of once-hot Asia has gone stone cold, Europe's economy is plugging along again nicely and may be on a roll. Indeed, California's exports to Europe are surging, helping to offset slumping sales to Asia.
BUSINESS
December 6, 1990 | KAREN TUMULTY and JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The world's poor countries, which were drawn into international trade talks four years ago by promises that they would gain new export markets, are complaining now that the talks have degenerated in their final scheduled week into a U.S.-European food fight. "We have been shut out completely," Mokammel Hague, the Bangladeshi commerce secretary, said Wednesday. "We are feeling like schoolchildren waiting for the results to come out of the headmaster's room." The "headmaster's room" is where U.S.
BUSINESS
June 16, 2001 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
If United Technologies Corp. renews its attempt to buy Honeywell International Inc., analysts said Friday, its bid will be complicated by the same objections from Europe that have all but ended General Electric Co.'s romance with Honeywell. After GE, United Technologies is seen as the leading candidate to link up with Honeywell. The Hartford, Conn.
BUSINESS
May 29, 2001 | From Reuters
General Electric Co., arguing it has facts and theory on its side, will offer no concessions to the European Commission at a closed hearing today over its purchase of Honeywell International Inc., legal sources close to the case said Monday. The commission is holding a two-day hearing on competitive issues rising out of the proposed combination of GE's manufacture of large commercial jet engines and Honeywell's fabrication of avionics and non-avionics parts for big planes. U.S.
BUSINESS
May 11, 2001 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The price of U.S. cowhide is soaring and the cost of finished leather will soon follow, the first major repercussions here from Europe's twin plagues of foot-and-mouth and "mad-cow" disease. American shoppers could end up paying as much as $1.5 billion more for leather goods over the next year, a Commerce Department economist said.
BUSINESS
April 14, 2001 | From Bloomberg News
Dole Food Co., the world's largest fruit and vegetable producer, blasted a settlement between the U.S. and European Union over EU banana-import rules, saying the accord favors rival Chiquita Brands International Inc. The agreement, which allocates shares of the EU banana market to producers from various parts of the world before the quotas are scrapped in 2006, is anti-free trade, said Westlake Village-based Dole.
BUSINESS
April 12, 2001 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States agreed Wednesday to call a truce in its bitter eight-year banana dispute with Europe, clearing the way for improved relations with a key ally in the global trade liberalization battle. Under the deal announced in Brussels, the European Union agreed to amend a controversial banana import system opposed by Chiquita Brands International Inc. and Dole Food Co. by July 1, and the U.S. said it will drop stiff sanctions it imposed two years ago on European goods.
NEWS
March 29, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States and the European Union both refused to yield Wednesday in a transatlantic food fight over an American ban on imports of European meat because of foot-and-mouth disease, and Europe's refusal to import biologically engineered food from the U.S. Agriculture Secretary Ann M. Veneman and David Byrne, the EU's commissioner for health and consumer protection, each promised to look into the competing import bans but ruled out any immediate change.
BUSINESS
May 11, 2001 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The price of U.S. cowhide is soaring and the cost of finished leather will soon follow, the first major repercussions here from Europe's twin plagues of foot-and-mouth and "mad-cow" disease. American shoppers could end up paying as much as $1.5 billion more for leather goods over the next year, a Commerce Department economist said.
BUSINESS
August 19, 1992 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal magistrate has recommended that a trial be held in the case of an Irvine woman who sued Xerox Corp., alleging that the company maliciously prosecuted her and harassed her.
NEWS
March 14, 2001 | MELINDA FULMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. regulators moved quickly Tuesday to ban imports of live hogs and all uncooked animal products from the European Union, temporarily shutting down more than $300 million in annual trade, after France reported Europe's first recent case of foot-and-mouth disease outside of Britain. Although foot-and-mouth does not pose a health risk to humans, it is deadly to cattle, sheep and hogs. It has no cure and travels so rapidly that entire herds and flocks must be destroyed to prevent its spread.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2001 | EDMUND SANDERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Commerce Secretary Norman Y. Mineta tried to drum up support Thursday for an international privacy pact that so far has failed to draw much enthusiasm from the U.S. companies it was designed to protect. Fewer than a dozen American firms have agreed to abide by the so-called safe-harbor agreement with the European Union, officials said Thursday. The pact, which took effect Nov. 1, was negotiated by the Commerce Department to ensure that U.S.
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