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NEWS
June 15, 2001 | EDWIN CHEN and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush and European Union leaders on Thursday stressed cooperation on the issues of trade and AIDS and downplayed their sharp differences over global warming by announcing collaborative research into the climate phenomenon. "The values and the goals we share are durable and they're healthy and they're great goals," Bush declared at an EU gathering here.
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NEWS
July 24, 2001 | From Bloomberg News
The World Trade Organization has ruled against a U.S. tax break that saves Boeing Co., Microsoft Corp. and other companies billions of dollars a year, U.S. trade officials said Monday. The ruling is a victory for the European Union, which challenged the U.S. law, and it moves the EU closer to imposing up to $4 billion in sanctions on U.S. exports. That would be by far the largest penalty in the WTO's six-year history. Rep. William M.
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NEWS
July 24, 2001 | From Bloomberg News
The World Trade Organization has ruled against a U.S. tax break that saves Boeing Co., Microsoft Corp. and other companies billions of dollars a year, U.S. trade officials said Monday. The ruling is a victory for the European Union, which challenged the U.S. law, and it moves the EU closer to imposing up to $4 billion in sanctions on U.S. exports. That would be by far the largest penalty in the WTO's six-year history. Rep. William M.
NEWS
June 15, 2001 | EDWIN CHEN and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush and European Union leaders on Thursday stressed cooperation on the issues of trade and AIDS and downplayed their sharp differences over global warming by announcing collaborative research into the climate phenomenon. "The values and the goals we share are durable and they're healthy and they're great goals," Bush declared at an EU gathering here.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1998 | Associated Press
In a victory that could be worth $250 million in exports for the U.S. beef industry, a World Trade Organization appeals panel decided there is no justification for a 9-year-old European ban on beef treated with hormones. The panel, acting on an appeal from the European Union, concluded that there are no scientifically proven health risks in the use of six hormones to promote growth in cattle. Nine out of 10 U.S. cattle are treated with such hormones.
BUSINESS
November 18, 2000 | Associated Press
The European Union threatened to slap record sanctions on U.S. products, saying a new U.S. export tax system is just as unpalatable as the one struck down earlier this year by the World Trade Organization. If enforced, the sanctions would set the two economic giants on their biggest trade dispute yet. The 15-nation European Union asked the WTO to review the law President Clinton signed Thursday that institutes the new system.
BUSINESS
May 29, 1997 | (Reuters)
The U.S. and the European Union said they have cleared the way for a deal under which approval of safety standards by one country would be accepted by others in five product categories. "We feel that we have a breakthrough, and we hope that it will lead to an agreement in the next few days," President Clinton said after talks at The Hague with Dutch Prime Minister Wim Kok and European Commission President Jacques Santer.
BUSINESS
March 30, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Banana Trade Sanctions Opposed: Belize Prime Minister Manuel Esquivel has asked U.S. officials to drop a trade action against the European Union over banana import quotas. Esquivel said in Washington this week that if the United States followed through with threatened sanctions, it would "virtually destroy the banana industry in the Caribbean." The U.S. proceeding results from a complaint from Chiquita Brands International Inc.
BUSINESS
March 11, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
6 EU Nations Side With U.S. in 'Open Skies' Deal: Braving the threat of lawsuits, Austria, Luxembourg, Belgium, Finland, Sweden and Denmark sided with the United States and snubbed their own executive commission to continue talks on "open skies" agreements. European Union Transport Commissioner Neil Kinnock said U.S. airlines will gain greater access in the 15-nation EU than what is offered in return, arguing that bilateral deals would give "aggressive and predatory" U.S.
BUSINESS
November 21, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
EU Extends Broadcast Quota Directive: Backing France's call to continue restrictive quotas on Hollywood imports, the European Union agreed to extend the restrictive system and make enforcement easier. In a compromise move, the 15 EU culture ministers decided to continue for at least five years the essence of the current Television Without Frontiers measure, which limits non-European imports to less than 50% of air time on EU screens.
BUSINESS
January 26, 2001 | From Bloomberg News
Chiquita Brands International Inc., blaming a trade dispute with the European Union for almost wiping out its market value, filed a $525-million lawsuit against the EU's ruling body for blocking imports of bananas. Chiquita, the world's largest banana producer, said it suffered damages of $200 million annually through lost EU market share because of the European Commission's failure to comply with World Trade Organization rulings that found the 15-nation bloc's banana-importing system illegal.
BUSINESS
December 19, 2000 | BLAIR PETHEL, BLOOMBERG NEWS
President Clinton warned European Union leaders they were risking a trade dispute with the U.S. over plans to subsidize Airbus Industrie's new super-jumbo passenger aircraft, U.S. officials said Monday. Clinton told the EU officials at a summit in Washington that loans to develop the new A3XX jet must not be made by EU governments on preferential terms. The aircraft will be the largest in the world if it enters service as planned in 2006, a year later than Airbus' original projection of 2005.
BUSINESS
November 18, 2000 | Associated Press
The European Union threatened to slap record sanctions on U.S. products, saying a new U.S. export tax system is just as unpalatable as the one struck down earlier this year by the World Trade Organization. If enforced, the sanctions would set the two economic giants on their biggest trade dispute yet. The 15-nation European Union asked the WTO to review the law President Clinton signed Thursday that institutes the new system.
NEWS
October 1, 2000 | From Associated Press
The United States and the European Union reached agreement Saturday to delay imposition of a possible $4 billion in economic sanctions against the United States in a trade dispute involving tax breaks for American exports. The deal was announced by the Clinton administration, which had been negotiating against a midnight Saturday deadline for overhauling U.S. tax laws to come into compliance with the adverse ruling from the World Trade Organization.
BUSINESS
June 5, 1998 | From Bloomberg News
European Union nations may continue to impose tariffs on U.S. computer-networking equipment exports ahead of a July 1, 2000, deadline for eliminating all such tariffs, a trade arbitration appeals panel has ruled. The ruling of a World Trade Organization appeals board is a blow to companies including California-based Cisco Systems Inc. and Bay Networks Inc., as well as New Hampshire-based Cabletron Systems, which want to sell their products at lower prices in the lucrative European market.
NEWS
May 28, 1998 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration, acting at the behest of Mattel Inc. and other toy companies, is lobbying against European efforts to ban controversial chemical compounds from teething rings and other toys for young children. With the European Union nearing a decision on whether to prohibit the sale of toys made with polyvinyl chloride, or PVC, the Commerce Department has instructed U.S. diplomats to try to turn around several such bans already in effect.
BUSINESS
October 13, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. Dismisses EU Banana Reforms: The United States has rejected plans by the European Commission to change banana import rules that it says harm U.S. companies. A U.S. official said a report presented by EU Farm Commissioner Franz Fischler did not address the main issue of a higher tariff quota for bananas from Latin American plantations where U.S. companies have major investments. The official said imports from Latin America are restricted by a tariff quota of 2.
BUSINESS
May 9, 1997 | From Associated Press
The United States, in a decision that could have major ramifications for global farm trade, has won a preliminary victory before the World Trade Organization in a bitter fight with the European Union over the use of hormones in beef. U.S. officials, who have seen the initial decision, said a three-judge WTO panel has held that the European Union's ban on U.S. beef treated with growth hormones is not based on sound science.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1998 | Bloomberg News
The World Trade Organization has ruled in favor of the U.S. in a dispute over tariffs imposed by the EU, Britain and Ireland on U.S. computer networking equipment exports, a senior U.S. trade official said. "We are pleased the WTO panel has ruled these tariffs clearly violate WTO obligations," U.S. Trade Representative Charlene Barshefsky said in a statement. The ruling means San Jose-based Cisco Systems Inc. and Santa Clara-based Bay Networks Inc.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1998 | Associated Press
In a victory that could be worth $250 million in exports for the U.S. beef industry, a World Trade Organization appeals panel decided there is no justification for a 9-year-old European ban on beef treated with hormones. The panel, acting on an appeal from the European Union, concluded that there are no scientifically proven health risks in the use of six hormones to promote growth in cattle. Nine out of 10 U.S. cattle are treated with such hormones.
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