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United States Trade Hong Kong

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NEWS
August 12, 1997 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For years, one of Hong Kong's claims to uniqueness has been its prodigious appetite for cellular phones, Mercedes-Benz autos and Sunkist oranges. The statistics insist that the average Hong Kong resident consumes a whopping 64 pounds of oranges a year, nearly four times as much as an American. But that is one of Hong Kong's little secrets: As many as 40% of those oranges--about $30 million worth--aren't consumed here at all. They find their way across the border into China, where U.S.
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BUSINESS
January 17, 1998 | Times Wire Services
International lenders Friday officially completed a plan to roll over South Korean short-term debt through March 31, a source close to the talks told Reuters. "It gives us the time to sit down and work out an agreement with the Koreans longer term," the source said. U.S. Deputy Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers had said South Korea needs to strike a deal with international lenders "as rapidly as practicable" to roll over its short-term debt and strengthen investor confidence.
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NEWS
June 18, 1997 | JIM MANN
Let's look at the future of the relationships among the United States, China and Hong Kong as the British colony returns to Chinese control on July 1. What's going to happen? Three broad trends are already emerging and will become ever clearer over the next year. First, the United States and China will clash with each other repeatedly over the issue of elections and democracy in Hong Kong.
NEWS
August 12, 1997 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For years, one of Hong Kong's claims to uniqueness has been its prodigious appetite for cellular phones, Mercedes-Benz autos and Sunkist oranges. The statistics insist that the average Hong Kong resident consumes a whopping 64 pounds of oranges a year, nearly four times as much as an American. But that is one of Hong Kong's little secrets: As many as 40% of those oranges--about $30 million worth--aren't consumed here at all. They find their way across the border into China, where U.S.
BUSINESS
February 26, 1997 | JAMES FLANIGAN
As U.S. government and business focus on China in the wake of Deng Xiaoping's death, keep in mind that Southern California has a different perspective on most matters concerning China and Asia. The region is more directly involved with China than the rest of the country, which is an advantage if China prospers but trouble if it doesn't. Advantages are easy to identify. On trade, for example, Washington looks with alarm--misguided, in large measure--on the $39-billion excess of U.S.
BUSINESS
January 6, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hong Kong Appeals Tariff Plan: Hong Kong is expected to step up efforts to get the U.S. government to reconsider its tentative plans for applying punitive tariffs on Chinese products in retaliation for Beijing's failure to enforce intellectual property rights. Washington has threatened to impose the tariffs on many of China's products unless a dispute over its complaint that the Chinese breach U.S. companies' copyrights and patents is settled by Jan. 16.
BUSINESS
August 5, 1991 | ROBERT W. GIBSON, TIMES INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS CORRESPONDENT
To bystanders on the Pacific Rim--especially to Hong Kong--the battle between President Bush and Congress over China's trade status has been like watching an accident happen in their own back yard. They see it as a threat to themselves and beyond their control. Strictly speaking, the dispute is between Washington and Beijing. But Hong Kong's economy is so blended with China's that U.S. termination of Beijing's most-favored-nation trading privileges would cost the British Crown Colony up to $4.
NEWS
June 18, 1997 | JIM MANN
Let's look at the future of the relationships among the United States, China and Hong Kong as the British colony returns to Chinese control on July 1. What's going to happen? Three broad trends are already emerging and will become ever clearer over the next year. First, the United States and China will clash with each other repeatedly over the issue of elections and democracy in Hong Kong.
BUSINESS
February 26, 1997 | JAMES FLANIGAN
As U.S. government and business focus on China in the wake of Deng Xiaoping's death, keep in mind that Southern California has a different perspective on most matters concerning China and Asia. The region is more directly involved with China than the rest of the country, which is an advantage if China prospers but trouble if it doesn't. Advantages are easy to identify. On trade, for example, Washington looks with alarm--misguided, in large measure--on the $39-billion excess of U.S.
BUSINESS
April 7, 1992 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the comfort of his large office across from the Tustin Marine Corps Air Station, Michael Lee contemplates what among the vast array of American products might be a hit with consumers in Taiwan and Hong Kong. Lee, 40, is president of Alton Industries Corp. in Tustin, a subsidiary of Taiwan's Yieh Loong Group, a giant conglomerate with its principal interest in steelmaking.
BUSINESS
January 18, 1992 | CHRISTINE COURTNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Trade officials and business leaders in Hong Kong expressed optimism Friday over resolving other trade disputes between the United States and China following an agreement between both countries to protect American intellectual property rights. Brian Chau, Hong Kong's secretary for trade and industry, said the news of the agreement has helped ease the mood of uncertainty hanging over Hong Kong trade and paves the way for a brighter future.
BUSINESS
January 6, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hong Kong Appeals Tariff Plan: Hong Kong is expected to step up efforts to get the U.S. government to reconsider its tentative plans for applying punitive tariffs on Chinese products in retaliation for Beijing's failure to enforce intellectual property rights. Washington has threatened to impose the tariffs on many of China's products unless a dispute over its complaint that the Chinese breach U.S. companies' copyrights and patents is settled by Jan. 16.
NEWS
November 11, 1991 | DAVID HOLLEY and SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Six years ago, Chen Zhanhong the tailor made eight to 10 pieces of clothing a day as he pedaled a foot-powered sewing machine on the sidewalk. He earned $100 a month. Today, Chen, 35, rules over five factories, four shops and 500 employees, with sales last year of $2 million. He casually predicts that by the end of this decade, sales for One Plus One Clothes-Making Ltd. will reach $100 million.
BUSINESS
August 5, 1991 | ROBERT W. GIBSON, TIMES INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS CORRESPONDENT
To bystanders on the Pacific Rim--especially to Hong Kong--the battle between President Bush and Congress over China's trade status has been like watching an accident happen in their own back yard. They see it as a threat to themselves and beyond their control. Strictly speaking, the dispute is between Washington and Beijing. But Hong Kong's economy is so blended with China's that U.S. termination of Beijing's most-favored-nation trading privileges would cost the British Crown Colony up to $4.
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