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United States Trade India

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BUSINESS
January 14, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Satellite Technology Management Inc.: The firm said this week it has received a $1.6-million contract from National Radio & Electronics Co. Ltd. of Bombay, India, for a satellite communications network. National Radio & Electronics is a unit of the Tata Group, India's largest conglomerate with annual sales of about $6 billion.
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NEWS
August 12, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The Bush administration will start pressing Congress next month to lift sanctions placed on India after its 1998 nuclear tests, clearing the way for greater military planning, joint operations and eventual sharing of weapons technology with New Delhi. Deputy Secretary of State Richard L. Armitage said State Department officials have held preliminary talks with Capitol Hill and will move forward "at a speed visible to the naked eye" in easing sanctions once Congress returns from summer recess.
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NEWS
July 15, 1998 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House on Tuesday joined the Senate in voting to protect the nation's wheat farmers from the adverse effects of U.S. sanctions aimed at punishing India and Pakistan for nuclear tests they conducted in May. On a voice vote, House members exempted for one year agricultural commodities from the economic embargo that U.S. law required President Clinton to impose against the two nations. Before the vote, lawmakers expressed concern that the financial damage the sanctions cause U.S.
BUSINESS
May 2, 2000 | Associated Press
The Clinton administration said it was planning to file World Trade Organization cases against Brazil and five other nations, accusing the countries of unfair trade practices that are hurting American businesses. Brazil was targeted for two alleged violations, one involving textile products and the other one covering the administration's belief that the country needs to increase patent protection for U.S. products.
NEWS
July 10, 1998 | Associated Press
With millions of dollars of U.S. wheat exports on the line, the Senate voted Thursday to exempt agriculture credits from sanctions imposed on India and Pakistan in response to their nuclear detonations in May. "The sanctions are supposed to squeeze the targeted country, not the American producer," said Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.). "We should not sacrifice our farmers in an effort to put the nuclear genie back in the bottle."
NEWS
July 16, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Declaring that U.S. foreign policy shouldn't hurt farmers, President Clinton signed legislation exempting agricultural products from sanctions imposed on Pakistan and India, and the Senate later voted to give the president broad authority to temporarily lift all economic sanctions against the two countries. Clinton signed the farm measure late Tuesday, after the House and Senate rushed the bill through.
BUSINESS
January 18, 1995 | From Reuters
U.S. Commerce Secretary Ronald H. Brown announced 10 new deals for American companies Tuesday, bringing to $4 billion the value of business arrangements reaped during his trade mission to India. Brown said additional agreements worth another $12 billion are being pursued by U.S. companies. "We feel this is just scratching the surface, the tip of the iceberg," he said in remarks preceding a signing ceremony. The $2.
BUSINESS
January 26, 1995 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A coal-fired electric plant from a sister company of Southern California Edison. Two Boeing jumbo jets. Cable television to brighten Calcutta nights. Those were just some of the more than two dozen deals, memoranda of understanding and joint venture plans signed in a visit to India this month by a high-powered American business delegation led by U.S. Commerce Secretary Ronald H. Brown, who pronounced himself "overwhelmed."
BUSINESS
January 9, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Government Says Pact Will Help Exports: India's textiles minister, G. Venkat Swamy, said agreements signed late last year to provide the United States and European Union with greater market access will probably help boost textile exports by $350 million in the fiscal year ending March 31, from $6.68 billion. In Washington, U.S. Trade Representative Mickey Kantor described the agreement as a landmark representing "the first time that U.S.
NEWS
March 25, 2000 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton promoted trade between the world's two largest democracies Friday as he concluded a visit to India dominated by his diplomatic efforts to ease tensions in South Asia. The president said here that more than $4 billion in business agreements were signed this week between U.S. and Indian companies.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2000 | JAMES FLANIGAN
While arguments rage over trade relations with China, U.S. business and government are paying increased attention to another huge country and potential market: India. President Clinton's visit to India later this month will be followed in May by a Commerce Department tour that will bring U.S. manufacturers into contact with Indian business opportunities. India has never been prominent on the U.S. radar screen--not nearly as big and constant an issue as China.
BUSINESS
April 6, 1999 | Associated Press
The Clinton administration moved a step closer to slapping punitive tariffs on Japan, Spain and four other countries with a ruling that they illegally price some stainless steel in the United States. Shipments of stainless round wire from those countries would be subject to tariffs of as much as 36% if the U.S. International Trade Commission determines by mid-May that their pricing practices have injured or could injure U.S. producers.
NEWS
July 16, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Declaring that U.S. foreign policy shouldn't hurt farmers, President Clinton signed legislation exempting agricultural products from sanctions imposed on Pakistan and India, and the Senate later voted to give the president broad authority to temporarily lift all economic sanctions against the two countries. Clinton signed the farm measure late Tuesday, after the House and Senate rushed the bill through.
NEWS
July 15, 1998 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House on Tuesday joined the Senate in voting to protect the nation's wheat farmers from the adverse effects of U.S. sanctions aimed at punishing India and Pakistan for nuclear tests they conducted in May. On a voice vote, House members exempted for one year agricultural commodities from the economic embargo that U.S. law required President Clinton to impose against the two nations. Before the vote, lawmakers expressed concern that the financial damage the sanctions cause U.S.
NEWS
July 10, 1998 | Associated Press
With millions of dollars of U.S. wheat exports on the line, the Senate voted Thursday to exempt agriculture credits from sanctions imposed on India and Pakistan in response to their nuclear detonations in May. "The sanctions are supposed to squeeze the targeted country, not the American producer," said Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.). "We should not sacrifice our farmers in an effort to put the nuclear genie back in the bottle."
BUSINESS
February 10, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
ITC Says Some Stainless Steel Imports Hurt U.S.: Stainless steel wire rod imports from Brazil, France and India are injuring or could injure the U.S. market, the International Trade Commission said in a preliminary ruling. The Commerce Department must now rule on whether imports from those countries are being sold on the American market at unfair prices, a practice called dumping. If the department finds dumping and the ITC rules that the imports are conclusively hurting the U.S.
BUSINESS
April 27, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush's Cabinet-level Economic Policy Council recommended Thursday that the Administration not cite Japan for alleged unfair trade practices this year, even though following the recommendation appears certain to spark a backlash in Congress. The unanimous decision is to be announced formally today. Bush, who was not at the meeting, is expected to approve the Cabinet recommendation intact, key Administration officials said.
NEWS
June 1, 1998 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Economic fallout from India's and Pakistan's decisions to go overtly nuclear has begun to descend on the two countries, among the world's poorest, and could become enormously damaging. India, home to more impoverished and illiterate people than any other nation, could be stripped of up to $20 billion in U.S. and international loans and aid, according to estimates from the White House. The country's already lagging growth rate may be slashed in half, Indian economists say.
BUSINESS
January 18, 1996 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every developing nation has its tests of corporate machismo. In India, executives trade horror stories about electrical power outages. "I was talking to a contractor not so long ago and his record last year was 13 power cuts in one day," said Julian Archer, managing director of Birla Parsons, a Delhi-based joint venture of Parsons Corp., a giant Pasadena-based engineering and construction firm.
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