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United States Trade Indonesia

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BUSINESS
July 28, 1990 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Commerce Secretary Robert A. Mosbacher, in a push to expand the market for U.S. exports, is escorting a party of chief executives from seven U.S. corporations to Indonesia and Thailand next week to meet with government officials and business executives there. The visit is part of Mosbacher's 10-day swing through Asia, which includes stops in Hong Kong and Singapore and is his first trip to Southeast Asia since taking over the Department of Commerce last year.
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BUSINESS
July 14, 2001 | Associated Press
Subsidized imports of steel reinforcing bars from five countries are harming American manufacturers, the U.S. International Trade Commission ruled. The six-member panel's decision allows the Commerce Department to decide whether to impose tariffs on the rebar, used in making reinforced concrete. The disputed rebar is manufactured in Belarus, China, Korea, Latvia and Moldova. Eleven American companies filed the complaint.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1992 | RICK HOLGUIN and MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Six environmental activists, protesting logging of the world's rain forests, handcuffed themselves Tuesday to cranes on a South Korean freighter docked in Long Beach and for several hours kept workers from unloading plywood from Indonesia. The activists from Greenpeace, Earth First! and the Rainforest Action Network boarded the ship at about 7 a.m. They ended their protest shortly before 1 p.m. when authorities agreed to cite them only for misdemeanor trespassing.
BUSINESS
June 14, 1997 | (Reuters)
The United States is seeking a World Trade Organization dispute panel ruling on Indonesia's national car policy. The request was placed on the agenda of the next meeting of the WTO's Dispute Settlement Body only hours after it set up a three-member panel to consider complaints from the European Union and Japan on an Indonesian policy giving tax and import duty breaks to a car firm headed by a son of President Suharto.
BUSINESS
July 14, 2001 | Associated Press
Subsidized imports of steel reinforcing bars from five countries are harming American manufacturers, the U.S. International Trade Commission ruled. The six-member panel's decision allows the Commerce Department to decide whether to impose tariffs on the rebar, used in making reinforced concrete. The disputed rebar is manufactured in Belarus, China, Korea, Latvia and Moldova. Eleven American companies filed the complaint.
BUSINESS
October 2, 1996 | From Reuters
The United States on Tuesday targeted four nations for investigations on charges of unfair trade practices and hailed progress with Japan to deregulate its insurance industry. Brazil, Indonesia and Australia face investigations in connection with programs that affect auto makers. Argentina is alleged to have excessively high tariffs on imported textiles, apparel and footwear. At a news conference, acting U.S.
BUSINESS
May 4, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Indonesia to Import Movies if U.S. Buys Textiles: Indonesia has promised to buy more Hollywood films so long as it can ship more textiles to the United States in return. "We will increase the number of Indonesian film and video importers, but in exchange we will export more textiles to the United States," Trade Minister Arifin Siregar told reporters last week. The Motion Picture Exports Assn.
BUSINESS
September 2, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Nation Pushing to Increase Oil Output: The government is calling for an expanded private- and public-sector effort to boost oil and natural gas production. Indonesia, already the world's leading exporter of liquefied natural gas, would increase LNG exports 50% by the year 2010 under a government plan. The U.S. Embassy in Jakarta said foreign oil companies have budgeted $2.27 billion for exploration work in 1991, up 80% from 1990.
NEWS
January 29, 1997 | JIM MANN
Is the Clinton administration serious this time? Or is this yet another Washington version of an Indonesian shadow play? Those are the questions that come to mind about President Clinton's Asia policy in the early days of his second term. For strange as it may sound, given the role Indonesian-linked money has played in the furor over Democratic Party fund-raising, Clinton is quietly laying the groundwork for what could be a new, tougher policy to combat Indonesia's repressive labor practices.
BUSINESS
October 2, 1996 | From Reuters
The United States on Tuesday targeted four nations for investigations on charges of unfair trade practices and hailed progress with Japan to deregulate its insurance industry. Brazil, Indonesia and Australia face investigations in connection with programs that affect auto makers. Argentina is alleged to have excessively high tariffs on imported textiles, apparel and footwear. At a news conference, acting U.S.
NEWS
November 15, 1994 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Washington in turmoil and his party racked with post-election anguish, President Clinton's trip to distant Indonesia this week might seem a masterpiece of ill timing. It might, except that its chief subject, trade, has gradually emerged as one of the strongest elements in his foreign policy--and one that figures to be even more vital to him politically in the next two years.
NEWS
January 18, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the midst of a full-drawn campaign to boost the United States' economic clout in Asia, the Clinton Administration stepped gingerly Monday through the minefield of human rights in a growing, $3-billion market, indicating that it will continue Indonesia's preferential trade treatment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1992 | RICK HOLGUIN and MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Six environmental activists, protesting logging of the world's rain forests, handcuffed themselves Tuesday to cranes on a South Korean freighter docked in Long Beach and for several hours kept workers from unloading plywood from Indonesia. The activists from Greenpeace, Earth First! and the Rainforest Action Network boarded the ship at about 7 a.m. They ended their protest shortly before 1 p.m. when authorities agreed to cite them only for misdemeanor trespassing.
NEWS
January 29, 1997 | JIM MANN
Is the Clinton administration serious this time? Or is this yet another Washington version of an Indonesian shadow play? Those are the questions that come to mind about President Clinton's Asia policy in the early days of his second term. For strange as it may sound, given the role Indonesian-linked money has played in the furor over Democratic Party fund-raising, Clinton is quietly laying the groundwork for what could be a new, tougher policy to combat Indonesia's repressive labor practices.
NEWS
September 22, 1992 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Suyatmi, a shy, 20-year-old factory worker, is too poor to know much about sneakers. She never heard of Bo Jackson and is too skinny to care about aerobics. Her world consists of a rented, five-foot-square room in a shantytown where she sleeps on the concrete floor with three other young women. Every day at 7 a.m., Suyatmi begins work at P. T. Hardaya Aneka Shoes Industry, one of six companies in Indonesia making sports shoes for Nike Inc., the spectacularly successful U.S.
BUSINESS
May 4, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Indonesia to Import Movies if U.S. Buys Textiles: Indonesia has promised to buy more Hollywood films so long as it can ship more textiles to the United States in return. "We will increase the number of Indonesian film and video importers, but in exchange we will export more textiles to the United States," Trade Minister Arifin Siregar told reporters last week. The Motion Picture Exports Assn.
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