Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Trade Industrialized Nations
IN THE NEWS

United States Trade Industrialized Nations

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
July 27, 1995 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The industrialized world--minus the United States--reached agreement Wednesday to liberalize international trade in financial services, a move that U.S. banking, insurance and securities interests viewed with a mixture of hope and skepticism. The deal, expected to be finalized in Geneva on Friday, should make it easier for financial service firms to enter foreign markets. And though the United States is not a party to the agreement, American firms still stand to benefit.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
July 27, 1995 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The industrialized world--minus the United States--reached agreement Wednesday to liberalize international trade in financial services, a move that U.S. banking, insurance and securities interests viewed with a mixture of hope and skepticism. The deal, expected to be finalized in Geneva on Friday, should make it easier for financial service firms to enter foreign markets. And though the United States is not a party to the agreement, American firms still stand to benefit.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 11, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When President Bush declared last month that reinvigorating the stalled global trade-liberalization talks would be his No. 1 priority at this week's economic summit, he drew yawns and snickers around the world. Traditionally, Presidents have cared only about "big picture" political issues such as the environment and aid to the Soviet Union. Few have been willing to spend much personal capital on resolving murky trade disputes.
NEWS
July 18, 1991 | JOEL HAVEMANN and KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Leaders of the seven biggest industrial democracies recommitted themselves Wednesday to liberalizing the rules of international commerce but tacitly conceded that they had failed to jump-start the deadlocked effort to negotiate a new trade accord. Indeed, this year's declaration closely resembled the promise at last year's economic summit to complete a new trade accord by the end of 1990.
NEWS
July 18, 1991 | JOEL HAVEMANN and KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Leaders of the seven biggest industrial democracies recommitted themselves Wednesday to liberalizing the rules of international commerce but tacitly conceded that they had failed to jump-start the deadlocked effort to negotiate a new trade accord. Indeed, this year's declaration closely resembled the promise at last year's economic summit to complete a new trade accord by the end of 1990.
NEWS
July 10, 1990 | TOM REDBURN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The crack in the longstanding impasse between the United States and Europe over farm subsidies Monday came when West Germany broke ranks with its European partners to support President Bush in his campaign to move the current round of trade expansion talks off dead center. For West German Chancellor Helmut Kohl, the desire to support the U.S.
NEWS
July 12, 1990 | JACK NELSON and TOM REDBURN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush on Wednesday won a pledge from leaders of the major industrial democracies to end a longstanding deadlock on trade negotiations that U.S. officials had feared could plunge the world economy into chaos and recession. In a final communique ending the three-day economic summit, the leaders declared that the successful outcome of the current trade talks, known as the Uruguay Round, "has the highest priority on the international economic agenda." U.S.
NEWS
July 12, 1990 | JACK NELSON and TOM REDBURN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush on Wednesday won a pledge from leaders of the major industrial democracies to end a longstanding deadlock on trade negotiations that U.S. officials had feared could plunge the world economy into chaos and recession. In a final communique ending the three-day economic summit, the leaders declared that the successful outcome of the current trade talks, known as the Uruguay Round, "has the highest priority on the international economic agenda." U.S.
NEWS
July 11, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When President Bush declared last month that reinvigorating the stalled global trade-liberalization talks would be his No. 1 priority at this week's economic summit, he drew yawns and snickers around the world. Traditionally, Presidents have cared only about "big picture" political issues such as the environment and aid to the Soviet Union. Few have been willing to spend much personal capital on resolving murky trade disputes.
NEWS
July 10, 1990 | TOM REDBURN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The crack in the longstanding impasse between the United States and Europe over farm subsidies Monday came when West Germany broke ranks with its European partners to support President Bush in his campaign to move the current round of trade expansion talks off dead center. For West German Chancellor Helmut Kohl, the desire to support the U.S.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|