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United States Trade Iran

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BUSINESS
January 10, 1993 | MICHAEL FLAGG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's something odd going on here, the IBM security man thought. Here's a customer who just spent $102,000 to have a special computer room built in his offices. But the big IBM mainframe computer he had bought wouldn't even fit through the door. The computer, one of the most powerful IBM makes, now sat in the outer office, still in its packing crates. In fact, federal agents--using cameras hidden in the hall outside the office--had already watched it being delivered.
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NEWS
March 18, 2000 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Acknowledging past mistakes in U.S. policy toward Iran, Secretary of State Madeleine Albright on Friday launched a major overture to Tehran that could open up trade, expedite settlement of frozen assets and lead to a renewal of formal diplomatic relations after 20 years of hostility.
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NEWS
November 8, 1992 | STEVE COLL, THE WASHINGTON POST
After shunning Iranian oil for years because of political sensitivities, major U.S. oil companies recently have become some of Iran's biggest customers and are now buying Iranian crude at an annual rate of more than $3.5 billion, according to oil traders, industry officials and analysts. The U.S. purchases amount to about one-fourth of Iran's total oil exports and mark a major shift in the international trading practices of some large U.S. oil companies.
NEWS
March 7, 2000 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what would be a groundbreaking initiative to spur rapprochement with Iran, the Clinton administration is close to a decision to lift economic sanctions on Iranian carpets, caviar and pistachios, U.S. officials said Monday. The gesture, one of several now being considered, would follow the sweeping election victory last month by Iranian reformers, ending two decades of domination by conservatives in Iran's parliament.
BUSINESS
April 10, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jetliner Sale to Iran Under Review: The White House is reviewing a proposal by Boeing Co. and General Electric Co. to pursue a potential multimillion-dollar deal with Iran for commercial aircraft and engines. The Washington Post reported that Iran is interested in buying as many as 20 Boeing 737-400 passenger jets equipped with GE engines, worth as much as $750 million. "We're reviewing it," said White House spokeswoman Dee Dee Myers. "We'll take a look at it out of fairness to the industry."
BUSINESS
May 20, 1993 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fifteen months ago, Satellite Technology Management Inc. was riding high. The company, which uses satellite transmission links to create corporate communications networks, raised about $13 million in an initial public offering in February, 1992. It had also landed its largest customer, the Philippine Long Distance Telephone Co., which ordered a $6-million telephone network in January, 1992.
BUSINESS
June 19, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Chevron Gets OK to Import Iranian Oil: The San Francisco-based oil company says it has received approval from the Treasury Department to import Iranian crude oil the United States, making it the second U.S. firm to renew imports from Iran. Chevron would not comment on the size of its cargo from National Iranian Oil Co. Proceeds from the sales will go into a special fund at the Hague for the settlement of accounts between the United States and Iran.
BUSINESS
June 8, 1991 | From Reuters
The Treasury Department said Friday that applications to import Iranian crude oil into the United States are being considered but none were yet approved. "We are still at a point where we have several applications but no licenses have been granted," a Treasury official said. But oil industry sources said Coastal Corp. and Chevron Corp. are close to receiving approval to bring in Iranian oil.
BUSINESS
June 20, 1998 | Associated Press
Gateway Inc. agreed to pay a fine of $402,000 to settle charges of illegally shipping personal computers to Iran, Syria and 14 other countries subject to U.S. export controls. The Commerce Department said Gateway made the 1992 and 1993 sales even though the North Sioux City, S.D., company knew they required export licenses and in many cases falsified shipment declarations. Computer sales to most countries outside the NATO alliance are restricted, and U.S.
BUSINESS
January 27, 1998 | BARBARA MARSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Allergan Inc. agreed to pay $824,000 to settle Commerce Department allegations that it improperly exported medicine made from a lethal toxin that can be used in biological warfare, the federal agency said Monday. The penalty is the largest since international controls on biological exports became law six years ago, the agency said.
BUSINESS
May 7, 1995 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Is Iran the great Satan or a country that should be brought back into the community of nations, even made an ally of the United States? The answer is that Iran is probably more stupid than menacing, but needs to be dealt with intelligently in any event. Americans should understand that a lot more than oil and gas are at stake in the issue of Iran. The price of oil has risen in recent months, but Iran had little to do with that. Rather, U.S.
BUSINESS
May 2, 1995 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS and VICKI TORRES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Oil prices hit a nine-month high Monday in the wake of President Clinton's announcement of a trade ban with Iran, but experts anticipate little long-term impact on oil markets or for the relatively small group of U.S. companies that still do business with Iran. Clinton's plan to ban all U.S. investment in and trade with Iran carries a tough message to the Tehran regime, but it probably will disrupt oil and other markets for only a short time, analysts said.
NEWS
May 2, 1995 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the Clinton Administration campaigned vigorously Monday against Tehran, analysts from America, Europe and the Middle East predicted that new U.S. sanctions banning trade with and investment in Iran will have little economic impact there--and might even backfire. President Clinton's decision to eliminate the last visible ties with Iran sends "an unmistakable message to friend and foe alike" that the United States is "determined to stop them," Secretary of State Warren Christopher said Monday.
NEWS
May 1, 1995 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton, hoping to strike a blow at a rogue state, announced tough new sanctions against Iran on Sunday that ban all U.S. investment in and trade with the Mideast nation. The President said the step, which will prohibit all U.S.
BUSINESS
November 13, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Newport Firm Hit With Export Ban: The U.S. Department of Commerce temporarily barred a Newport Beach firm and its two principals from any export activity. The order bans Reza (Ray) Amiri, an Iranian national; his company, Ray Amiri Computer Consultants, and its manager, Mohammad (Don) Danesh, from exporting any goods from the United States for a 180-day period that began Tuesday. Amiri and Danesh were arrested Aug.
BUSINESS
March 8, 1995 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration on Tuesday criticized Conoco's $1-billion oil and gas contract with Iran, while the chairman of the Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee promised hearings on the question of banning commercial transactions between Iran and the United States. White House Press Secretary Mike McCurry reacted to news that a Dutch affiliate of the Houston-based oil concern will develop two Iranian oil fields.
BUSINESS
July 27, 1993 | DEBORA VRANA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In an abrupt about-face, the Commerce Department has reversed its decision to allow a technology company accused of violating federal export laws to ship a satellite communications system to Brazil. Satellite Technology Management in Costa Mesa said Monday that it received notice late Friday that the Bureau of Export Administration was withdrawing the favorable classification advisory it had issued July 20. The withdrawal forced the company to stop shipment of a $1.
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