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United States Trade Iraq

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NEWS
April 11, 1991 | From a Times Staff Writer
White House officials Wednesday denied news reports that a Commerce Department official, Dennis Kloske, has been fired after publicly blaming Pentagon and State Department officials for failing to block exports of high technology to Iraq in the months preceding the Aug. 2 invasion of Kuwait. The incident was the latest in an intensive round of Washington finger-pointing over who will get the blame for the Administration's refusal to clamp down on trade with Iraq before the invasion.
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BUSINESS
August 10, 1999 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Noting that most U.S. oil companies oppose the case, the Commerce Department refused Monday to investigate complaints that oil imported from Mexico, Saudi Arabia, Venezuela and Iraq is unfairly priced and hurts domestic producers. The government's decision averts an inquiry sought by small U.S. oil producers that could have led to duties on almost half the crude shipped to the U.S. It sent gasoline prices soaring.
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NEWS
August 3, 1990 | TOM REDBURN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The broad trade embargo that President Bush imposed on Iraq is not expected to have a major impact on that country's economy, analysts said Thursday, and Washington cannot push for worldwide sanctions without risking a recession at home. In theory, analysts said that Iraq's heavy economic dependence on selling oil abroad should make it highly vulnerable to the kind of economic sanctions that Bush--and other American Presidents--historically have relied upon to achieve their foreign policy goals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1998
A crowd of nearly 300 people gathered Thursday at UCLA to hear students and faculty speakers decry the continuation of U.S. sanctions against Iraq, which they said have caused the deaths of more than 1 million Iraqis from starvation and poor medical treatment.
BUSINESS
August 10, 1999 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Noting that most U.S. oil companies oppose the case, the Commerce Department refused Monday to investigate complaints that oil imported from Mexico, Saudi Arabia, Venezuela and Iraq is unfairly priced and hurts domestic producers. The government's decision averts an inquiry sought by small U.S. oil producers that could have led to duties on almost half the crude shipped to the U.S. It sent gasoline prices soaring.
NEWS
July 2, 1992 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ and MURRAY WAAS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Newly declassified documents describe fears within the U.S. government that Iraq was diverting technology to its nuclear-weapons program as early as 1985--much earlier than previously known. The documents contradict angry assertions Wednesday by President Bush that the United States was unaware of any such diversion in the years before the Persian Gulf War while Washington was providing billions of dollars in aid and technology to Baghdad.
BUSINESS
July 4, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Mitsui Fined for False Statements: The exporter of agricultural products pleaded guilty to falsifying statements to the U.S. Department of Agriculture so the company could trade with Iraq. A U.S. District Court judge in Atlanta ordered Mitsui Inc. of New York to pay a $10,000 fine and $8.3 million in restitution to the USDA's Commodity Credit Corp. The U.S. government had made loan guarantees in the 1980s and early 1990 to entice banks to advance Iraq money to buy American farm products.
NEWS
November 17, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Saddam Hussein's trusted minister of trade did not want to talk politics one recent morning in his well-appointed office--a key regime power center in the heart of Baghdad, heavily guarded by soldiers and filled with the remembrances of war.
NEWS
September 2, 1993 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge Wednesday rejected claims by a division of Teledyne Inc. that its role in the sale of 24,000 cluster bombs to Iraq was legal because the transactions were part of a secret U.S. policy to arm Iraq before the Persian Gulf War. In response to a government motion to keep classified information secret, U.S. District Judge Shelby Highsmith in Miami said that the claim by the Los Angeles-based defense company "does not constitute any legally cognizable defense."
NEWS
August 3, 1990 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An outraged Congress moved swiftly Thursday to support President Bush's economic sanctions against Iraq, as key lawmakers from both parties urged the White House to consider coordinating a possible allied military response to the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait. A bill providing for broad sanctions against Iraq was rushed to the floor and passed by a unanimous 416-0 vote in the House.
NEWS
June 9, 1995 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN and WILLIAM C. REMPEL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A yearlong undercover investigation into the black market trade in nuclear materials from the former Soviet Union ended Thursday with the seizure of seven tons of zirconium sold to U.S. agents posing as arms buyers for Iraq. Five tons were seized in New York where three men, referred to by undercover agents as "the Greeks," were arrested and charged with export violations. One is the former president of a Manhattan bank. It was the largest confiscation of such materials in U.S. history.
BUSINESS
April 5, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Teledyne Worker Convicted in Zirconium Case: A federal jury in Miami convicted Edward A. Johnson on four counts related to filing false license applications for illegal exports of zirconium by Los Angeles-based Teledyne Inc., said his attorney, Gerald Houlihan. Johnson, who plans to appeal, was acquitted on three other related counts, Houlihan said. The jury also acquitted another former Teledyne worker, Ronald W.
NEWS
September 2, 1993 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge Wednesday rejected claims by a division of Teledyne Inc. that its role in the sale of 24,000 cluster bombs to Iraq was legal because the transactions were part of a secret U.S. policy to arm Iraq before the Persian Gulf War. In response to a government motion to keep classified information secret, U.S. District Judge Shelby Highsmith in Miami said that the claim by the Los Angeles-based defense company "does not constitute any legally cognizable defense."
NEWS
April 9, 1993 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Justice Department has declined to prosecute anyone for altering a list of export licenses to delete references to military uses for goods approved for sale to Iraq, it was disclosed Thursday. The list had been requested by the chairman of a congressional panel investigating the George Bush Administration's pre-Persian Gulf War policy of secretly aiding the regime of Iraqi President Saddam Hussein.
NEWS
November 17, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Saddam Hussein's trusted minister of trade did not want to talk politics one recent morning in his well-appointed office--a key regime power center in the heart of Baghdad, heavily guarded by soldiers and filled with the remembrances of war.
NEWS
October 29, 1992 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Pentagon has begun an internal review to determine how notorious artillery designer Gerald Bull obtained a U.S. export license for computers used in the design of Iraq's supergun, sources said Wednesday. The inquiry, following disclosure of the technology transfer this week, is at least the fifth government investigation launched in recent months into aspects of the Bush Administration's assistance to Iraq before the Persian Gulf War.
NEWS
June 16, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Bush Administration officials told a Senate committee they oppose trade sanctions against Iraq despite its "abysmal" human rights record and its use of chemical weapons, saying such measures would hurt U.S. farmers more than the Baghdad government. Both Democratic and Republican members of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee reacted angrily to the Administration position. Sen. Nancy Landon Kassebaum (R-Kan.
NEWS
July 28, 1990 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House and the Senate voted overwhelmingly Friday to impose trade sanctions against Iraq, whose ruler was denounced by lawmakers in both chambers as a "mad dog" and a "butcher" with a human rights record so bleak that it can no longer be ignored by U.S. policy-makers.
NEWS
October 27, 1992 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration approved export licenses for computers and software that helped design Iraq's notorious supergun and a ballistic missile capable of reaching Israel and other Middle East countries, according to documents and congressional investigators. The export license for the computers was granted in the fall of 1989 to a Maryland company controlled by artillery wizard Gerald Bull, who was assassinated six months later outside his apartment in Belgium.
NEWS
October 23, 1992 | From a Times Staff Writer
President Bush said Thursday that he "overstated a little bit" when he claimed during the final presidential debate that no U.S. technology was used in Iraq's nuclear-weapons program. But Bush downplayed the role of American computers and other equipment discovered in Iraq's nuclear facilities by U.N. inspectors. He said a limited amount of U.S. material had been sold to Baghdad for commercial purposes and illegally switched to military uses by the Iraqis.
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