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United States Trade Japan

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BUSINESS
August 12, 1991 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Do we Americans really dislike the Japanese? What cause do we have for malice? Who among us has been truly threatened, wronged or otherwise hurt as a consequence of Japan's formidable economic power? These questions have been haunting the rarefied debate over U.S.-Japan relations for years, and now a congressional panel is offering a new high-resolution focus for the quandary: racial bias in the workplace.
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BUSINESS
October 26, 2001 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Nissan Motor Co. riding high on its return to profitability this year, Japan's No. 4 and 5 auto makers say they too see black ink in their futures, with their U.S. operations playing increasingly important roles in their turnarounds despite the terrorist attacks and the American economic slowdown. Mazda Motor Corp. expects to "return to profit at all levels of the company this year," President Mark Fields told reporters this week at a preview of the 35th annual Tokyo Motor Show.
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NEWS
July 22, 1996 | LESLIE HELM and GALE EISENSTODT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One afternoon last October, Akio Tanii staggered into his laboratory at the agricultural experiment station outside this small farming village. He was bleary-eyed and distraught. His colleagues were relieved to see him safe because his family had reported him missing overnight and Tanii had been under great stress. The 53-year-old scientist was sent home to rest. Once there, he grew short of breath and fell seriously ill. He was rushed by ambulance to the hospital, where he died that night.
BUSINESS
June 21, 2001 | Bloomberg News
The U.S. Commerce Department imposed a 31% import duty on welded pipe made by Kawasaki Steel Corp., Nippon Steel Corp. and other Japanese companies, fanning concern about the potential for broad U.S. controls on foreign steel. The ruling, which is preliminary, comes in response to a complaint in February by American Cast Iron Pipe Co. and other U.S. producers, accusing the Japanese of selling the steel at unfairly low prices.
NEWS
February 4, 1992 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the fifth floor of the Japan Productivity Center in Shibuya, Tamisaburo Sasaki stabbed a finger in the air and sputtered: "It's all misinformation!" All around him, the Japanese press, politicians and public have been perpetuating the image of lazy, inefficient and non-productive Americans. They paint a picture of America on the slippery slope of decline. Television flashes images of drugs and crime; newspapers spin out story after story on shoddy U.S. products.
BUSINESS
June 5, 1994 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this golf-crazy land, the Biggu Basa may be the ultimate American import success story. The Biggu Basa-- as the Japanese have dubbed the Big Bertha golf club made by Carlsbad, Calif.-based Callaway Golf Co.-- draws much praise here. "When you hit a ball that's on the ground, it's easy for it to go too low or off to the side.
BUSINESS
February 25, 1995 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time ever, shoppers in America now can purchase a plump, pink piece of history--an apple grown in Japan. But the arrival here last week of high-priced Fuji apples from Aomori prefecture, the preeminent apple-growing region in northern Japan, drew little attention outside of the local Asian-language media.
BUSINESS
December 13, 1988 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
Alfred Sloan, the founding father of the modern General Motors, followed one guiding principle--the huge auto company, he said, should be structured to provide a car "for every purse and purpose." Thus, GM developed five car divisions so that it could move its customers, as they grew older and richer, from Chevrolets up through Cadillacs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1994 | LILY DIZON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John B. Williams sells a special kind of guns--the kind that don't work. You can't put bullets in Williams' revolvers; he rigs the chambers so the shells won't fit. And even if you somehow were able to force the bullets in, the springs have been removed from the guns, so the triggers and hammers won't click. You can't insert an ammunition clip in Williams' semiautomatics; the grips have been sealed. And the guns wouldn't shoot anyway, because the slides have been welded to keep them from firing.
BUSINESS
July 15, 1991 | HAL FOSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you ask the average Japanese whether the United States or Japan makes better cars, he may think you're joking. Japanese autos, after all, consistently beat the rest of the pack in customer satisfaction surveys. It's the same with Japanese televisions, stereos and a host of other products. But when the subject turns to furniture--well, that's a different story.
BUSINESS
May 4, 2001 | From Bloomberg News
A U.S. trade agency said stainless steel imports from Japan, South Korea and Spain have hurt Slater Steel Inc., one of North America's biggest specialty steel makers, clearing the way for duties of as much as 115%. The decision, the latest victory by the U.S. steel industry in its effort to repel imports from the U.S. market, affects such companies as Japan's Sumitomo Metal Industries Ltd., Daido Steel Co. and Aichi Steel Corp.
NEWS
March 20, 2001 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush met with Japanese Prime Minister Yoshiro Mori on Monday, but the leaders did not come up with any specific measures to revive growth in the world's two largest economies. Senior U.S. officials said Bush advised Mori that Japan should not try to stimulate its economy by increasing exports--an approach that might harm American industries, such as automobiles, that compete with Japanese firms.
BUSINESS
December 20, 2000 | Reuters
U.S. negotiators failed to persuade Japan to extend a five-year auto trade agreement that expires Dec. 31, raising the prospect of increased trade friction between the two countries as President-elect George W. Bush takes office. In a conference call with reporters, U.S.
BUSINESS
December 1, 2000 | From Associated Press
AT&T Corp. is selling 16% of its wireless business for $9.8 billion to NTT DoCoMo, Japan's top mobile phone company, giving AT&T new funds and a savvy partner in the drive to deliver mobile Internet services. The widely expected deal announced Thursday gives NTT DoCoMo access to the rapidly growing U.S. wireless phone market while providing AT&T with cash to help reduce its massive debt.
BUSINESS
November 8, 2000 | Reuters
Japan, the single biggest buyer of American corn, resumed its purchases with a 127,000-ton order days after the U.S. government agreed to begin testing to prevent StarLink gene-spliced corn from tainting exports, the U.S. Agriculture Department said. U.S. and Japanese officials spent two weeks negotiating a testing plan to satisfy Tokyo's demands that StarLink be prevented from contaminating any corn shipments.
BUSINESS
November 4, 2000 | RANDY FABI, REUTERS
The U.S. on Friday sought to calm Japanese fears about biotech corn by launching an unprecedented program to test exports, while a new poll showed a majority of Americans are concerned about the safety of the same gene-altered food. In the center of the furor is StarLink corn, a gene-spliced variety that has not been approved for use in human food because of U.S. scientists' concern that it might cause allergic reactions.
NEWS
February 10, 1996 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In yet another trade dispute with Japan--this time over music by recording stars ranging from the Four Tops to the Doors--the United States formally complained to the World Trade Organization on Friday about Tokyo's failure to observe foreign music copyrights prior to 1971. The period from 1946 to 1971, said U.S. Trade Representative Mickey Kantor, touting his Nashville heritage, was "one of the most vibrant and popular periods in the history of American music."
BUSINESS
October 19, 1990 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
AST Research Inc., an Irvine-based personal computer maker, has signed up three distributors for its new made-for-Japan computer, overcoming the final obstacle to beginning sales next month of the hybrid machine. The machine drew strong interest when it was first announced in July because it was the first time an outside company had challenged NEC Corp.'s dominance of the Japanese personal computer market with a compatible machine.
BUSINESS
October 26, 2000 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. effort to convince the rest of the world that genetically modified foods are safe hit a huge roadblock Wednesday when a Japanese consumer group charged that some altered corn products from the U.S. that are banned for human consumption had found their way onto Japan's supermarket shelves. The news is expected to fuel the already charged global debate over the safety of these foods, heighten consumer concerns in Asia and Europe and spur accusations that the U.S.
BUSINESS
August 18, 2000 | Associated Press
Circular seamless stainless pipes imported from Japan are not hurting American steel companies, the U.S. International Trade Commission ruled. The panel voted 4 to 2 to dismiss the complaint of six U.S. steelmakers and the United Steelworkers of America. Circular seamless stainless pipes are used in nuclear and conventional power plants, stock lines for petrochemical facilities, pharmaceutical production lines and food-processing equipment.
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