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United States Trade Latin America

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NEWS
April 18, 2001 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush on Tuesday vowed to intensify the fight for the right to negotiate a hemisphere-wide trade accord without congressional interference. He also argued that without free trade and prosperity democracy will never flourish in Latin America. Looking toward the Summit of the Americas in Quebec City this weekend, Bush sought to answer critics of the free-trade efforts that have been at the center of U.S. international economic policy for the last decade.
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NEWS
April 18, 2001 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush on Tuesday vowed to intensify the fight for the right to negotiate a hemisphere-wide trade accord without congressional interference. He also argued that without free trade and prosperity democracy will never flourish in Latin America. Looking toward the Summit of the Americas in Quebec City this weekend, Bush sought to answer critics of the free-trade efforts that have been at the center of U.S. international economic policy for the last decade.
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NEWS
December 6, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton and the leaders of 33 other Western Hemisphere nations will set a goal of creating a free-trade zone joining the United States, Canada and all of Latin America when they meet this weekend in Miami in the first hemisphere-wide summit conference in a generation, officials said Monday. Clinton Administration officials said that the most difficult issue to resolve in establishing the goal is a target date.
BUSINESS
November 8, 1998 | JAMES FLANIGAN
The protests of the American steel industry over a wave of imports from Japan, Russia, Brazil, South Korea and other nations are justified this time. Furthermore, the issue here goes well beyond steel--an industry that now employs only 163,000 workers, a tiny fraction of the U.S. labor force. The steel imports are part of a general unloading of goods this year by producers in Asia, Russia and Latin America, which are shipping to the U.S.
BUSINESS
December 12, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The goal could hardly be grander, more ambitious or more specific: the establishment of a free-trade zone of unprecedented scope, making it no more taxing, in terms of duties and quotas, to sell an Iowa-built refrigerator in Argentina than it is to sell the same productin Alabama.
NEWS
December 11, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Embarking on what President Clinton called a "historic step," the United States and 33 other nations of the Western Hemisphere agreed Saturday to complete complex negotiations within a decade to eliminate all tariffs and other barriers to free trade from the Arctic to Argentina.
NEWS
December 11, 1994 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Say it loud or say it soft, it's never going to roll off anyone's tongue: FTAA, pronounced "ftaah." That's the acronym for the name U.S. and other negotiators came up with for the trading zone they plan to build among the nations of the Western Hemisphere: the Free Trade Area of the Americas. Earlier, officials had expected the new pact to be dubbed the Americas Free Trade Area, which produces a more mellifluous AFTA.
BUSINESS
December 9, 1994 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The agenda at this weekend's Summit of the Americas in Miami may accent lofty themes, but U.S. business leaders reading between the lines see nothing but concrete opportunities coming out of any move toward hemispheric free trade. U.S. financial services, telecommunications companies and energy equipment manufacturers see huge markets opening up in Latin American countries just now emerging from protectionist regimes and registering rapid economic gains.
NEWS
December 10, 1993 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After NAFTA it's our turn, Chileans insist. After Mexico, no Latin American country has campaigned harder than Chile for a free-trade pact with the United States. And now that the U.S. Congress has approved the inclusion of Mexico in the North American Free Trade Agreement, Chile is champing at the bit. Some advocates of an agreement with Chile argue that it should have been signed even before NAFTA.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1990 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For much of the 20th Century, Latin America has anguished over its economic underdevelopment. Its failure to achieve industrial power and prosperity has been blamed on everything from Iberian absolutism and Yankee imperialism to capital flight and foreign debt.
BUSINESS
April 12, 1997 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton launched a public campaign Friday to press Congress to give him the tools he needs to build freer trade relationships with Latin American and Asian nations, stressing that America does not "need to be afraid of foreign trade." The president called on Congress to grant him authority to negotiate trade pacts that cannot be amended in the House or Senate, warning that the nation's competitive standing in world markets is at stake.
BUSINESS
January 8, 1997 | VANESSA VALKIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ten years ago, Steve Bernard and his wife began a small business making kettle-fried chips in a shop in Cape Cod, Mass. Today they're looking far from home for big sales growth--to markets in Europe, South America and Canada. "We're growing 100% every year," Bernard said. "The area where the U.S. has a little edge is in snack food." While U.S. agricultural exports are projected to drop overall this year, snack-food exports boomed 30% the first six months of 1996, according to the U.S.
BUSINESS
January 1, 1996 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Latin American economy should bounce back this year along with Mexico, and no one would be happier than Fortune 500 companies such as General Electric Co. The Mexican crisis and the ripples it sent south hurt sales of a multitude of consumer products--from light bulbs to washers, dryers and refrigerators--produced by GE especially for Latin American consumers. GE's light bulb sales dipped 9% in Mexico in 1995, and big-ticket items fell 40%.
BUSINESS
November 4, 1995 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nat Stock's family milled lumber in Oregon's Willamette Valley for three generations until the company went broke in 1992, a victim of the federal government's shutdown of logging in a surrounding national forest to protect the endangered spotted owl. Stock was one of 250 lumber mill owners in the Northwest who went belly-up, left with no logs to cut. But he is trying to come back--by accommodating a new economic order that has prompted U.S.
BUSINESS
December 12, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The goal could hardly be grander, more ambitious or more specific: the establishment of a free-trade zone of unprecedented scope, making it no more taxing, in terms of duties and quotas, to sell an Iowa-built refrigerator in Argentina than it is to sell the same productin Alabama.
NEWS
December 12, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON and WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton and the leaders of 33 Western Hemisphere nations concluded a weekend summit Sunday by signing a free-trade agreement that Clinton called "a watershed in the history of the hemisphere." The leaders promised that the 32-page document, which agrees to create the largest free-trade zone in the world, will mean more jobs and prosperity for the region's citizens.
NEWS
June 29, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush's Latin America initiative is potentially the most sweeping since the Alliance for Progress of the early 1960s, but it may well be years before it has any major impact, government and private analysts said Thursday. Although Mexico and possibly Brazil may move quickly to take advantage of the trade and debt-reduction benefits that the proposal offers, most other Latin countries are nowhere near being prepared to undertake the kind of economic reforms that it demands in return.
NEWS
December 11, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Embarking on what President Clinton called a "historic step," the United States and 33 other nations of the Western Hemisphere agreed Saturday to complete complex negotiations within a decade to eliminate all tariffs and other barriers to free trade from the Arctic to Argentina.
NEWS
December 11, 1994 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Say it loud or say it soft, it's never going to roll off anyone's tongue: FTAA, pronounced "ftaah." That's the acronym for the name U.S. and other negotiators came up with for the trading zone they plan to build among the nations of the Western Hemisphere: the Free Trade Area of the Americas. Earlier, officials had expected the new pact to be dubbed the Americas Free Trade Area, which produces a more mellifluous AFTA.
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