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NEWS
February 9, 1991 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Pentagon is locating and bombing military airfields and hardened bunkers in Iraq with the help of a document obtained from the office of a mysterious, now-deceased Iraqi expatriate and alleged arms broker, an attorney who helped acquire the information said Friday. The document--part of a 1981 contract to build 16 military sites in Iraq for $552 million--was sold to the U.S. Customs Service by an employee of London-based IBI Engineering shortly after Iraq invaded Kuwait last August.
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BUSINESS
March 7, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Security Pacific Unit Fined: The United States has fined six companies $550,000 for violating U.S. sanctions against Libya, the Treasury Department said. "This is a warning to companies throughout the world that they may not do business with Libya from or through the United States," it said. The six companies are Security Pacific International Bank; Fina Exploration Libya, a subsidiary of Petrofina; Vitol S.A. Inc.
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NEWS
July 20, 1989 | From Associated Press
President Bush said Wednesday that he will keep in place three-year-old economic sanctions and a trade embargo against Libya.
NEWS
February 9, 1991 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Pentagon is locating and bombing military airfields and hardened bunkers in Iraq with the help of a document obtained from the office of a mysterious, now-deceased Iraqi expatriate and alleged arms broker, an attorney who helped acquire the information said Friday. The document--part of a 1981 contract to build 16 military sites in Iraq for $552 million--was sold to the U.S. Customs Service by an employee of London-based IBI Engineering shortly after Iraq invaded Kuwait last August.
NEWS
January 10, 1987 | From Times Staff Writer
A federal magistrate in New Orleans on Friday ordered a Scottish businessman held without bond on charges that he violated a U.S. trade embargo by helping to supply Libya with crucial oil field equipment. Francis George Christie, of Aberdeen, Scotland, will be transferred in 10 days to San Diego, where he will be among the first to stand trial for breaking the embargo imposed by President Reagan last February. Also charged with Christie were George and Cheryl Smith of Gretna, La.
NEWS
January 22, 1987 | Associated Press
President Reagan on Wednesday renewed a broad set of economic sanctions against Libya, saying the policies of the government of Col. Moammar Kadafi continue to pose an extraordinary threat to the national security and foreign policy of the United States. The sanctions, banning Libyan exports and imports and forbidding Americans from traveling to Libya, were imposed a year ago.
BUSINESS
March 7, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Security Pacific Unit Fined: The United States has fined six companies $550,000 for violating U.S. sanctions against Libya, the Treasury Department said. "This is a warning to companies throughout the world that they may not do business with Libya from or through the United States," it said. The six companies are Security Pacific International Bank; Fina Exploration Libya, a subsidiary of Petrofina; Vitol S.A. Inc.
NEWS
December 5, 1987 | JENIFER WARREN, Times Staff Writer
A federal court jury Friday convicted a Louisiana couple of exporting oil field equipment to Libya in violation of a U.S. embargo on trade with the North African country, which has been charged by President Reagan with sponsoring terrorism. After about a day and a half of deliberations, jurors convicted Cheryl Smith, 37, and her husband, George Smith, 50, on all 11 counts contained in a federal indictment handed down in January. The charges included conspiracy to defraud the U.S.
NEWS
August 11, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
Francis George Christie, a Scottish businessman who channeled petrochemical equipment made at a San Diego firm to Libya in violation of a U.S. trade embargo, pleaded guilty Monday in federal court in San Diego to conspiring to defraud the federal government.
NEWS
January 9, 1987 | JIM SCHACHTER, Times Staff Writer
Federal undercover agents in New Orleans arrested a Scots businessman and the operators of a Louisiana oil services company Thursday on charges of supplying critically needed oil field equipment to Libya in violation of a U.S. trade embargo, federal authorities here announced. The arrests--the first since President Reagan imposed near-absolute barriers to business dealings with Libya last February--followed a six-month undercover investigation that ended when U.S.
NEWS
July 20, 1989 | From Associated Press
President Bush said Wednesday that he will keep in place three-year-old economic sanctions and a trade embargo against Libya.
NEWS
July 29, 1988 | Washington Post
Eight men, six of them Libyans, were charged Thursday in Alexandria, Va., with using a McLean, Va.-based student group and a District of Columbia travel agency as fronts to violate the U.S. trade embargo on Libya, gather intelligence and "further Libyan foreign revolutionary policy" in the United States. A 40-count indictment handed up by a federal grand jury charged the defendants with conspiracy, money laundering and violations of U.S. trade sanctions against Libya.
NEWS
December 25, 1987 | Associated Press
Libya is building a plant that a Reagan Administration official said Thursday could be used to manufacture chemical weapons. "We're worried," the official said. "They (chemical weapons) can be produced anywhere in the Third World and are hard to verify." The United States has no diplomatic relations with Libya and has imposed a ban on trade with the North African country.
NEWS
December 5, 1987 | JENIFER WARREN, Times Staff Writer
A federal court jury Friday convicted a Louisiana couple of exporting oil field equipment to Libya in violation of a U.S. embargo on trade with the North African country, which has been charged by President Reagan with sponsoring terrorism. After about a day and a half of deliberations, jurors convicted Cheryl Smith, 37, and her husband, George Smith, 50, on all 11 counts contained in a federal indictment handed down in January. The charges included conspiracy to defraud the U.S.
NEWS
August 11, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
Francis George Christie, a Scottish businessman who channeled petrochemical equipment made at a San Diego firm to Libya in violation of a U.S. trade embargo, pleaded guilty Monday in federal court in San Diego to conspiring to defraud the federal government.
NEWS
January 22, 1987 | Associated Press
President Reagan on Wednesday renewed a broad set of economic sanctions against Libya, saying the policies of the government of Col. Moammar Kadafi continue to pose an extraordinary threat to the national security and foreign policy of the United States. The sanctions, banning Libyan exports and imports and forbidding Americans from traveling to Libya, were imposed a year ago.
NEWS
January 15, 1987 | JIM SCHACHTER, Times Staff Writer
The attorney for a Scottish businessman charged with violating the U.S. embargo on trade with Libya says the only deal the Scot's firm ever transacted with Tripoli was one arranged and consummated by an undercover U.S. agent. Patrick Fanning, the New Orleans lawyer representing Francis George Christie of Aberdeen, Scotland, also said this week that a U.S.
NEWS
December 25, 1987 | Associated Press
Libya is building a plant that a Reagan Administration official said Thursday could be used to manufacture chemical weapons. "We're worried," the official said. "They (chemical weapons) can be produced anywhere in the Third World and are hard to verify." The United States has no diplomatic relations with Libya and has imposed a ban on trade with the North African country.
NEWS
January 15, 1987 | JIM SCHACHTER, Times Staff Writer
The attorney for a Scottish businessman charged with violating the U.S. embargo on trade with Libya says the only deal the Scot's firm ever transacted with Tripoli was one arranged and consummated by an undercover U.S. agent. Patrick Fanning, the New Orleans lawyer representing Francis George Christie of Aberdeen, Scotland, also said this week that a U.S.
NEWS
January 10, 1987 | From Times Staff Writer
A federal magistrate in New Orleans on Friday ordered a Scottish businessman held without bond on charges that he violated a U.S. trade embargo by helping to supply Libya with crucial oil field equipment. Francis George Christie, of Aberdeen, Scotland, will be transferred in 10 days to San Diego, where he will be among the first to stand trial for breaking the embargo imposed by President Reagan last February. Also charged with Christie were George and Cheryl Smith of Gretna, La.
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