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United States Trade Mexico

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BUSINESS
April 22, 2001 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After years of unbridled expansion under the North American Free Trade Agreement, Mexico's garment industry is being forced to retool itself due to falling exports to the slowing U.S. market, tougher regional competition and weak domestic demand. More than 95% of Mexico's garment exports make their way to its two NAFTA partners, the U.S. and Canada.
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NEWS
September 30, 2001 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After seven years of boom times, the twin-city border crossing known as the two Laredos had already begun hurting from this year's economic slowdown. Then came the Sept. 11 terror attacks, and suddenly this city and Laredo on the U.S. side of the Rio Grande are reeling. Truck traffic has flattened after a decade of double-digit growth.
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BUSINESS
August 30, 1994 | Jack Searles
Petoseed Co., Saticoy-based producer of hybrid seeds, is harvesting increased business in Mexico because of an improving Mexican economy and because of the North American Free Trade Agreement. NAFTA has eliminated tariff costs and much of the red tape previously involved in dealing with Mexico, said Jay Hulbert, Petoseed's North American sales director. "There's a huge demand among Mexican consumers for quality tomatoes, lettuce, peppers, onions and other produce," Hulbert said.
BUSINESS
August 23, 2001 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This country's home-grown satellite telecommunications business is about to get a heavy dose of competition from powerful U.S. and European companies with more satellites and bigger wallets, and many think it could prove fatal. Those fears have provoked the latest in a long chain of heated debates in Mexico on free trade's pros and cons. It pits proponents of national sovereignty and security against those who argue for the benefits of open markets and competition in a key industry.
NEWS
February 4, 1996 | H.G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While the U.S. Customs Service has relaxed controls of cargo and passengers, its cocaine seizures have declined sharply over the past year, prompting U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) to call for firing the embattled agency's chief. Feinstein and U.S. Customs employees allege that drug interdiction is given relatively low priority under Commissioner George Weise as he presses a controversial program that allows millions of trucks to enter the country each year from Mexico without inspection.
BUSINESS
February 1, 1997 | MARTHA GROVES and MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The U.S. Department of Agriculture said Friday that it is lifting an 83-year-old ban on the importation of Mexican avocados into the continental United States, angering California growers fearful of pest invasions. After two years of emotional debate, the department ruled that Hass avocados from the Mexican region of Michoacan that meet U.S. import requirements could be shipped into 19 states in the Northeast and Midwest from November through February, beginning late this year.
BUSINESS
April 10, 1992 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mexican media giant Grupo Televisa's purchase of a minority interest in the largest U.S. Spanish-language television network has focused attention on an aspect of the talks concerning a North American free trade agreement that until now largely had been overlooked: TV station ownership. Since the possibility of a trade agreement was first discussed, Televisa Chairman Emilio Azcarraga has been pressuring for changes in the U.S.
BUSINESS
August 23, 1991 | From Reuters
A GATT disputes panel has ruled that a U.S. ban on tuna imports from Mexico violates international rules of commerce, a spokesman for the world trade body said Thursday. The United States imposed the ban in October, 1990, under environmental legislation, saying Mexican tuna-fishing methods killed dolphins that were caught in tuna nets. Mexico argued that the ban broke several General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade provisions, favoring U.S.
NEWS
May 8, 1997 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN and MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A beaming President Clinton told Mexicans on Wednesday that "our economic integration is inevitable" and urged them to help him fight common scourges such as drugs and defend the North American Free Trade Agreement. In the most extensive speech of his three-day state visit, Clinton stressed the heightened importance of the partnership with Mexico--the United States' No. 3 trading partner but also its No. 1 provider of illegal immigrants and primary transit point for cocaine.
BUSINESS
March 20, 1992 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seventeen-year-old Luis Arostigue visited Mexico a few times and he has retained some stark images of the country. Etched deep are memories of raw sewage and dire poverty. A free-trade pact among the United States, Canada and Mexico could provide jobs for Mexicans and abate the misery of many poor workers, said the senior from Century High School in Santa Ana.
NEWS
August 2, 2001 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defying President Bush's veto threat, the Senate on Wednesday approved a bill that would require Mexican trucks to meet strict safety standards before gaining unfettered access to U.S. highways. The bill was approved by voice vote over the objection of Bush and Republican allies who said the measure would violate the 1994 North American Free Trade Agreement and frustrate the president's own effort to expand trade with Mexico.
NEWS
July 12, 2001 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush's plan to permit Mexican trucks throughout the United States, already dealt a setback in the House, appears headed for a bumpy ride in the Senate. A Senate panel today is expected to approve a measure designed to turn up the pressure on the administration to take stronger steps to ensure the safety of Mexican freight haulers before they gain unfettered access to U.S. roads. Sen. Patty Murray (D-Wash.
BUSINESS
June 7, 2001 | From Associated Press
President Bush has opened the way for Mexicans to invest in U.S.-based trucking companies hauling international cargo and in bus companies operating in the United States. In a memo released Wednesday, Bush said he will comply with a long-delayed provision of the North American Free Trade Agreement that allows Mexicans to have 100% ownership of such U.S. carriers and bus companies by 1995. Under that provision, U.
BUSINESS
May 25, 2001 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mexican farmer Carlos Bon has turned a sweltering patch of red Sonora desert into a veritable cornucopia that produces hundreds of tons of table grapes every year for U.S. and European supermarkets, personifying the globalization of agriculture. But the success of the affable U.S.-educated Bon and the rest of this region's grape farmers has provoked a bitter cross-border trade battle. The tussle carries huge implications for the future of U.S.
NEWS
May 4, 2001 | From Associated Press
President Bush met Thursday with his Mexican counterpart, Vicente Fox, to discuss temporary visas for Mexican workers and plans for long-range energy development among Mexico, the U.S. and Canada. The meeting was the third for the pair, who talked at the Summit of the Americas in Canada last month and met in Mexico in February. Fox said they discussed long-range plans for the U.S. to import energy from Mexico and Canada, which have large reserves of oil and natural gas.
NEWS
April 22, 2001 | From Associated Press
A rally against the consequences of free trade resulted in a 20-minute standoff Saturday between rock-throwing protesters and police in riot gear at the U.S.-Mexico border, but there were no injuries or arrests, police said. A group of about 25 people identifying themselves as anarchists caused the confrontation by first taunting San Diego police and then throwing rocks and other objects.
BUSINESS
February 23, 1990 | JUANITA DARLING and STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Mexican clothing and cloth exports to the United States could double to $1.3 billion over the next two years under a new pact that a U.S. trade official called "the most liberal agreement we've ever negotiated in textiles." The U.S.-Mexican agreement eliminates quotas on more than half of Mexican-made textiles and increases most remaining quotas by one-fourth. Mexico also will be allowed to request increases in its export limits as needed.
BUSINESS
December 21, 1992 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mexican diplomats are leading the international protest against the United States' tightening of its 30-year-old embargo of Cuba, but many Mexican business executives aren't complaining about the American policy. The embargo--which bans commerce between the United States and Cuba--keeps powerful American competitors at bay while Mexican businesses strengthen their own presence in the Caribbean's largest market.
BUSINESS
April 22, 2001 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After years of unbridled expansion under the North American Free Trade Agreement, Mexico's garment industry is being forced to retool itself due to falling exports to the slowing U.S. market, tougher regional competition and weak domestic demand. More than 95% of Mexico's garment exports make their way to its two NAFTA partners, the U.S. and Canada.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2001 | JAMES F. SMITH and JENNIFER MENA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Mexican President Vicente Fox made good Thursday on his campaign pledge to govern his country for 118 million people--the 100 million south of the border and the 18 million of Mexican blood living in the United States.
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