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United States Trade Myanmar

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BUSINESS
January 28, 1997 | From Washington Post
PepsiCo Inc. has decided to pull all of its brands and business out of Myanmar, giving a major boost to a student and civic movement against U.S. economic involvement with the southeast Asian country's military government. In a statement sent Friday to the Maryknoll Fathers and Brothers religious community, which tried to bring shareholder pressure on PepsiCo to withdraw from Myanmar (formerly called Burma), PepsiCo's senior vice president and general counsel, Edward V. Lahey Jr.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 2000 | MAI TRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A rowdy crowd wearing masks and black clothes to represent death banged wooden drums early Monday outside a Brea-based oil conglomerate, shouting "Unocal out of Burma!" while security officers stood guard and passing drivers honked. The 75 Burmese human rights and labor activists were demanding that the company stop operating a pipeline in Burma, now known as Myanmar.
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BUSINESS
March 13, 1997 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
State Assemblywoman Dion Aroner (D-Berkeley) has introduced a bill that would bar state agencies from purchasing goods from companies doing business in Myanmar, formerly known as Burma. Similar laws have been passed by Massachusetts and a number of municipalities, including San Francisco, Oakland, Berkeley and Santa Monica.
BUSINESS
July 13, 1999 | Evelyn Iritani
The Massachusetts attorney general's office said that it will ask the U.S. Supreme Court to review a federal appeals court ruling that declared unconstitutional a state law banning agencies from doing business with companies involved in Myanmar, the military-ruled country formerly known as Burma. Democratic Rep.
BUSINESS
July 13, 1999 | Evelyn Iritani
The Massachusetts attorney general's office said that it will ask the U.S. Supreme Court to review a federal appeals court ruling that declared unconstitutional a state law banning agencies from doing business with companies involved in Myanmar, the military-ruled country formerly known as Burma. Democratic Rep.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1997 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unocal Corp.'s campaign to keep the Clinton administration from imposing tougher economic sanctions on the heavy-handed military regime running Myanmar has a powerful supporter in Sen. Dianne Feinstein, the coauthor of a Myanmar sanctions law signed last year. Feinstein, in a rare public statement on the issue, said Tuesday that reports of escalating violence and an alleged death threat against Nobel laureate Aung San Suu Kyi are not enough to trigger a ban on new U.S.
BUSINESS
March 11, 1991
Last week, Assistant Secretary of State Richard Soloman said the U.S. government is considering additional economic sanctions against My a nmar, formerly Burma. Soloman said the military has failed to transfer power to a civilian government, as decided in elections last May. Myanmar has also failed to release all political prisoners and improve its narcotics suppression, he said. Also last week, the U.N. Human Rights Commission voted to condemn Myanmar for various violations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1997
Chanting "Free Burma Now" and holding signs that read "L.A. taxpayers don't want to support the heroin trade," dozens of supporters of human rights for citizens of Myanmar urged Los Angeles officials Monday to boycott firms that do business in the Southeast Asian nation formerly known as Burma. The activists want the city to help pressure the military government in Myanmar to surrender power. Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch, the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 2000 | MAI TRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A rowdy crowd wearing masks and black clothes to represent death banged wooden drums early Monday outside a Brea-based oil conglomerate, shouting "Unocal out of Burma!" while security officers stood guard and passing drivers honked. The 75 Burmese human rights and labor activists were demanding that the company stop operating a pipeline in Burma, now known as Myanmar.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1997
Chanting "Free Burma Now" and holding signs that read "L.A. taxpayers don't want to support the heroin trade," dozens of supporters of human rights for citizens of Myanmar urged Los Angeles officials Monday to boycott firms that do business in the Southeast Asian nation formerly known as Burma. The activists want the city to help pressure the military government in Myanmar to surrender power. Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch, the U.S.
BUSINESS
March 13, 1997 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
State Assemblywoman Dion Aroner (D-Berkeley) has introduced a bill that would bar state agencies from purchasing goods from companies doing business in Myanmar, formerly known as Burma. Similar laws have been passed by Massachusetts and a number of municipalities, including San Francisco, Oakland, Berkeley and Santa Monica.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1997 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unocal Corp.'s campaign to keep the Clinton administration from imposing tougher economic sanctions on the heavy-handed military regime running Myanmar has a powerful supporter in Sen. Dianne Feinstein, the coauthor of a Myanmar sanctions law signed last year. Feinstein, in a rare public statement on the issue, said Tuesday that reports of escalating violence and an alleged death threat against Nobel laureate Aung San Suu Kyi are not enough to trigger a ban on new U.S.
BUSINESS
January 28, 1997 | From Washington Post
PepsiCo Inc. has decided to pull all of its brands and business out of Myanmar, giving a major boost to a student and civic movement against U.S. economic involvement with the southeast Asian country's military government. In a statement sent Friday to the Maryknoll Fathers and Brothers religious community, which tried to bring shareholder pressure on PepsiCo to withdraw from Myanmar (formerly called Burma), PepsiCo's senior vice president and general counsel, Edward V. Lahey Jr.
BUSINESS
March 11, 1991
Last week, Assistant Secretary of State Richard Soloman said the U.S. government is considering additional economic sanctions against My a nmar, formerly Burma. Soloman said the military has failed to transfer power to a civilian government, as decided in elections last May. Myanmar has also failed to release all political prisoners and improve its narcotics suppression, he said. Also last week, the U.N. Human Rights Commission voted to condemn Myanmar for various violations.
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