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NEWS
April 26, 1988
President Reagan extended a U.S. trade embargo against Nicaragua's leftist Sandinista government for a fourth year, starting May 1. "The actions and policies of the government of Nicaragua continue to pose an unusual and extraordinary threat to the national security and foreign policy of the United States," Reagan said in a statement. In Managua, President Daniel Ortega threatened to block U.S.
NEWS
April 26, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush Administration, acting on its own before Congress completes work on a $300-million assistance package, presented the new government of Nicaragua with an inaugural gift Wednesday marking the end of Sandinista rule: emergency medical aid, eligibility for financial credits and loan guarantees, and permission to resume sugar sales to the United States.
NEWS
July 10, 1988
Eight members of a convoy carrying aid to Nicaraguan civilians were arrested during a melee in Laredo, Tex., after they tried to cross a bridge into Mexico. The scuffle broke out on the international bridge when officers sprayed a cayenne-based irritant into the truck of the Veterans Peace Convoy, which had blocked a traffic lane for four hours.
NEWS
April 22, 1987
President Reagan ordered the two-year-old trade boycott of Nicaragua to remain in effect because he said that nation still poses "an unusual and extraordinary threat" to U.S. national security. In a message to Congress, Reagan acted to forestall the automatic termination of the emergency order May 1, saying it is necessary to continue the trade boycott and U.S. support for Nicaraguan contras.
NEWS
February 2, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration will end its economic sanctions against Nicaragua and restore friendly relations with the country's leftist government if it wins genuinely free and fair elections this month and ends its support for Marxist rebels in El Salvador, Secretary of State James A. Baker III said Thursday. "If we determine that it is free and fair and we determine that they have indeed stopped their support of subversion in neighboring countries . . .
NEWS
June 16, 1988
The Veterans Peace Convoy, rebuffed by federal agents as it tried to carry aid to Nicaragua across the U.S.-Mexican border, turned around and headed for Washington as supporters prepared to challenge the government action in court. Eight activists were briefly detained and four vehicles were impounded earlier in the day as the 37-vehicle caravan with about 30 tons of food, medicine and clothing was stopped at Laredo, Tex., by U.S. Customs officials.
NEWS
April 26, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush Administration, acting on its own before Congress completes work on a $300-million assistance package, presented the new government of Nicaragua with an inaugural gift Wednesday marking the end of Sandinista rule: emergency medical aid, eligibility for financial credits and loan guarantees, and permission to resume sugar sales to the United States.
NEWS
June 10, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
U.S. Treasury Department officials, citing a trade embargo, on Thursday again stopped a "peace convoy" carrying food and medical supplies bound for children in war-torn Nicaragua from crossing into Mexico. However, organizers of the convoy, which involves nearly 100 participants and more than three dozen vehicles, say they won't budge until they are allowed to cross the Rio Grande. Convoy organizers had planned to cross the Mexican border Wednesday morning, hoping to reach Nicaragua on June 18.
NEWS
February 2, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration will end its economic sanctions against Nicaragua and restore friendly relations with the country's leftist government if it wins genuinely free and fair elections this month and ends its support for Marxist rebels in El Salvador, Secretary of State James A. Baker III said Thursday. "If we determine that it is free and fair and we determine that they have indeed stopped their support of subversion in neighboring countries . . .
NEWS
July 29, 1988
A "peace convoy" protesting Reagan Administration policies in Central America arrived in Nicaragua, a month after U.S. officials tried to prevent it from leaving the United States with its cargo of medical supplies and food. The convoy of 20 trucks, vans and buses crossed the northern border into Nicaragua and was heading toward Managua to hand over the supplies, a spokesman for the group said in Managua. U.S.
NEWS
July 10, 1988
Eight members of a convoy carrying aid to Nicaraguan civilians were arrested during a melee in Laredo, Tex., after they tried to cross a bridge into Mexico. The scuffle broke out on the international bridge when officers sprayed a cayenne-based irritant into the truck of the Veterans Peace Convoy, which had blocked a traffic lane for four hours.
NEWS
June 16, 1988
The Veterans Peace Convoy, rebuffed by federal agents as it tried to carry aid to Nicaragua across the U.S.-Mexican border, turned around and headed for Washington as supporters prepared to challenge the government action in court. Eight activists were briefly detained and four vehicles were impounded earlier in the day as the 37-vehicle caravan with about 30 tons of food, medicine and clothing was stopped at Laredo, Tex., by U.S. Customs officials.
NEWS
June 10, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
U.S. Treasury Department officials, citing a trade embargo, on Thursday again stopped a "peace convoy" carrying food and medical supplies bound for children in war-torn Nicaragua from crossing into Mexico. However, organizers of the convoy, which involves nearly 100 participants and more than three dozen vehicles, say they won't budge until they are allowed to cross the Rio Grande. Convoy organizers had planned to cross the Mexican border Wednesday morning, hoping to reach Nicaragua on June 18.
NEWS
April 22, 1987
President Reagan ordered the two-year-old trade boycott of Nicaragua to remain in effect because he said that nation still poses "an unusual and extraordinary threat" to U.S. national security. In a message to Congress, Reagan acted to forestall the automatic termination of the emergency order May 1, saying it is necessary to continue the trade boycott and U.S. support for Nicaraguan contras.
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