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United States Trade North Korea

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NEWS
September 7, 1999 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As what are sure to be tense talks between the United States and North Korea begin in Berlin today, U.S., Japanese and South Korean officials have a message for concerned or frustrated observers: "To jaw-jaw always is better than to war-war."
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NEWS
July 5, 2000 | JIM MANN, Jim Mann's column appears in this space every Wednesday
Don't look now, but over the past six weeks, we've quietly entered a new era for U.S. foreign policy. A decade after the end of the Cold War, we now have the Corporate Peace. Since mid-May, the American business community has won a breathtaking series of victories in Washington, stripping away the sanctions that have somewhat limited its overseas operations.
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NEWS
July 5, 2000 | JIM MANN, Jim Mann's column appears in this space every Wednesday
Don't look now, but over the past six weeks, we've quietly entered a new era for U.S. foreign policy. A decade after the end of the Cold War, we now have the Corporate Peace. Since mid-May, the American business community has won a breathtaking series of victories in Washington, stripping away the sanctions that have somewhat limited its overseas operations.
NEWS
September 7, 1999 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As what are sure to be tense talks between the United States and North Korea begin in Berlin today, U.S., Japanese and South Korean officials have a message for concerned or frustrated observers: "To jaw-jaw always is better than to war-war."
BUSINESS
June 19, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. Firm to Pioneer Nation's Imports: The hard-line Communist country will export minerals to the United States in the first such deal in 42 years, Minerals Technologies Inc. said. The New York-based company said it has signed a deal with North Korea's Magnesia Clinker Export for a unit, Minteq International Inc., to ship tens of thousands of tons of magnesia that could cost several million dollars. Further details were not provided.
NEWS
December 16, 1995 | From the Washington Post
North Korea and a U.S.-led consortium signed a $4.5-billion agreement here Friday for construction of two light-water nuclear reactors that were promised to North Korea under a 1994 deal for Pyongyang to freeze a nuclear development program that the West feared would produce nuclear weapons.
BUSINESS
March 3, 1996 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When word leaked out that the Clinton administration might relax its economic embargo of North Korea in exchange for the shutdown of a suspected nuclear arms facility, New York businessman Allen Wenzel thought of one thing. Magnesite. Wenzel's wish was granted when a historic agreement was signed in Geneva in November 1994, opening up limited trade channels between the longtime ideological enemies in exchange for North Korean compliance with an international nuclear arms control treaty.
NEWS
January 6, 1995 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration declared Thursday that North Korea has complied with the initial provisions of the nuclear agreement signed by the two governments in October and said the United States is ready to begin fulfilling its part of the bargain. The Pentagon said it plans to send 50,000 metric tons of heavy residual fuel oil to a North Korean power plant to replace energy that would have been generated by a nuclear reactor shut down under the accord. U.S.
NEWS
August 13, 1999 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration is trying to work out a deal in which North Korea would agree not to test-launch its new long-range missile and in return would be rewarded with an easing or lifting of a decades-old U.S. trade embargo, according to U.S. officials and North Korea experts. Under this approach, North Korea would promise a moratorium on testing its new Taepodong 2 missile, which has a long enough range to strike many parts of Asia or even Alaska.
NEWS
August 13, 1999 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration is trying to work out a deal in which North Korea would agree not to test-launch its new long-range missile and in return would be rewarded with an easing or lifting of a decades-old U.S. trade embargo, according to U.S. officials and North Korea experts. Under this approach, North Korea would promise a moratorium on testing its new Taepodong 2 missile, which has a long enough range to strike many parts of Asia or even Alaska.
BUSINESS
March 3, 1996 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When word leaked out that the Clinton administration might relax its economic embargo of North Korea in exchange for the shutdown of a suspected nuclear arms facility, New York businessman Allen Wenzel thought of one thing. Magnesite. Wenzel's wish was granted when a historic agreement was signed in Geneva in November 1994, opening up limited trade channels between the longtime ideological enemies in exchange for North Korean compliance with an international nuclear arms control treaty.
NEWS
December 16, 1995 | From the Washington Post
North Korea and a U.S.-led consortium signed a $4.5-billion agreement here Friday for construction of two light-water nuclear reactors that were promised to North Korea under a 1994 deal for Pyongyang to freeze a nuclear development program that the West feared would produce nuclear weapons.
BUSINESS
June 19, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. Firm to Pioneer Nation's Imports: The hard-line Communist country will export minerals to the United States in the first such deal in 42 years, Minerals Technologies Inc. said. The New York-based company said it has signed a deal with North Korea's Magnesia Clinker Export for a unit, Minteq International Inc., to ship tens of thousands of tons of magnesia that could cost several million dollars. Further details were not provided.
NEWS
January 6, 1995 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration declared Thursday that North Korea has complied with the initial provisions of the nuclear agreement signed by the two governments in October and said the United States is ready to begin fulfilling its part of the bargain. The Pentagon said it plans to send 50,000 metric tons of heavy residual fuel oil to a North Korean power plant to replace energy that would have been generated by a nuclear reactor shut down under the accord. U.S.
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