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United States Trade Pakistan

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NEWS
July 15, 1998 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House on Tuesday joined the Senate in voting to protect the nation's wheat farmers from the adverse effects of U.S. sanctions aimed at punishing India and Pakistan for nuclear tests they conducted in May. On a voice vote, House members exempted for one year agricultural commodities from the economic embargo that U.S. law required President Clinton to impose against the two nations. Before the vote, lawmakers expressed concern that the financial damage the sanctions cause U.S.
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NEWS
July 16, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Declaring that U.S. foreign policy shouldn't hurt farmers, President Clinton signed legislation exempting agricultural products from sanctions imposed on Pakistan and India, and the Senate later voted to give the president broad authority to temporarily lift all economic sanctions against the two countries. Clinton signed the farm measure late Tuesday, after the House and Senate rushed the bill through.
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NEWS
July 10, 1998 | Associated Press
With millions of dollars of U.S. wheat exports on the line, the Senate voted Thursday to exempt agriculture credits from sanctions imposed on India and Pakistan in response to their nuclear detonations in May. "The sanctions are supposed to squeeze the targeted country, not the American producer," said Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.). "We should not sacrifice our farmers in an effort to put the nuclear genie back in the bottle."
NEWS
July 15, 1998 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House on Tuesday joined the Senate in voting to protect the nation's wheat farmers from the adverse effects of U.S. sanctions aimed at punishing India and Pakistan for nuclear tests they conducted in May. On a voice vote, House members exempted for one year agricultural commodities from the economic embargo that U.S. law required President Clinton to impose against the two nations. Before the vote, lawmakers expressed concern that the financial damage the sanctions cause U.S.
NEWS
July 16, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Declaring that U.S. foreign policy shouldn't hurt farmers, President Clinton signed legislation exempting agricultural products from sanctions imposed on Pakistan and India, and the Senate later voted to give the president broad authority to temporarily lift all economic sanctions against the two countries. Clinton signed the farm measure late Tuesday, after the House and Senate rushed the bill through.
NEWS
January 14, 1988
The State Department has concluded that Pakistan was probably involved in a plot to smuggle materials for nuclear devices out of the United States, but it is recommending that aid to Pakistan not be severed, Administration officials said. The findings were in a memorandum sent to President Reagan regarding the case of Arshad Z.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1995 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Having won a sympathetic ear at the White House this week, Pakistani Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto came to Los Angeles on Wednesday to reach out to the private sector for investment in her struggling Muslim nation. "We realize it's a new world and we're not looking for dependency, we're looking for partnership," Bhutto said in a meeting with Los Angeles Times editors and reporters. "We'd like trade, not aid."
NEWS
June 1, 1998 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Economic fallout from India's and Pakistan's decisions to go overtly nuclear has begun to descend on the two countries, among the world's poorest, and could become enormously damaging. India, home to more impoverished and illiterate people than any other nation, could be stripped of up to $20 billion in U.S. and international loans and aid, according to estimates from the White House. The country's already lagging growth rate may be slashed in half, Indian economists say.
NEWS
July 10, 1998 | Associated Press
With millions of dollars of U.S. wheat exports on the line, the Senate voted Thursday to exempt agriculture credits from sanctions imposed on India and Pakistan in response to their nuclear detonations in May. "The sanctions are supposed to squeeze the targeted country, not the American producer," said Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.). "We should not sacrifice our farmers in an effort to put the nuclear genie back in the bottle."
NEWS
June 1, 1998 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Economic fallout from India's and Pakistan's decisions to go overtly nuclear has begun to descend on the two countries, among the world's poorest, and could become enormously damaging. India, home to more impoverished and illiterate people than any other nation, could be stripped of up to $20 billion in U.S. and international loans and aid, according to estimates from the White House. The country's already lagging growth rate may be slashed in half, Indian economists say.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1995 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Having won a sympathetic ear at the White House this week, Pakistani Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto came to Los Angeles on Wednesday to reach out to the private sector for investment in her struggling Muslim nation. "We realize it's a new world and we're not looking for dependency, we're looking for partnership," Bhutto said in a meeting with Los Angeles Times editors and reporters. "We'd like trade, not aid."
NEWS
January 31, 1989
Pakistani government officials are said to be proposing a swap that would send U.S.-made nuclear reactors to their country in exchange for safeguards to assure that the country's nuclear program is used only for peaceful purposes. Rep. Stephen J. Solarz (D-N.Y.), chairman of the House Foreign Affairs Asian subcommittee, said such an agreement could head off a showdown later this year on a cutoff of U.S. aid to Pakistan over its failure to comply with nuclear non-proliferation requirements.
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