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NEWS
February 8, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congress gave formal approval Wednesday to the first installment of the Bush Administration's new $1 billion aid-to-Panama package, paving the way for signing by the President by the end of the week. Identical versions of the measure cleared both the House and Senate by voice vote, reflecting a desire by members of both parties to speed the aid package to invasion-racked Panama, which has been suffering since 1988 under U.S. economic sanctions.
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NEWS
February 15, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush signed into law Wednesday the first $542 million of a $1-billion economic recovery package for Panama, with plans to finance the remaining $500 million in cash aid by diverting money from the defense budget. The measure, which was pushed through Congress in less than three weeks, is designed to help Panama revive its economy after 21 months of U.S. economic sanctions and the December invasion that toppled strongman Manuel A. Noriega.
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NEWS
October 28, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Bush Administration on Friday designated Panamanian strongman Gen. Manuel A. Noriega an agent of Cuba, a declaration that could result in fines and jail terms for U.S. companies that do business with him. Noriega, his wife, Felicidad Sieiro de Noriega, and 32 companies, including several hotels and airport duty-free shops, are being added to the list of 134 firms and individuals already identified as Cuban agents in Panama, the Treasury Department announced.
NEWS
February 15, 1990 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A federal money-laundering investigation has uncovered evidence that Gen. Manuel A. Noriega received millions of dollars in kickbacks from a coffee-smuggling scheme, according to sources close to the inquiry. The allegations involve contraband Colombian coffee that was shipped to Panama, rebagged as Panamanian coffee and exported to the United States and elsewhere. The scheme enabled the Colombian producers to evade export quotas and sell the coffee for a higher price.
NEWS
February 7, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congressional committees, moving with lightning speed, gave initial approval Tuesday to the first installment of the Bush Administration's $1-billion aid package for Panama, with plans to send the measure to the President for his signature as early as next week. In separate actions, the House Foreign Affairs and Senate Foreign Relations committees approved identical proposals providing $500 million to help rebuild public works and $42 million in emergency "humanitarian" aid.
NEWS
January 25, 1990 | ART PINE and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush today will announce a $1.1-billion package of aid to Panama designed to help the country recover from the pre-Christmas U.S. invasion and to resuscitate its crippled economy after 21 months under American economic sanctions. Officials cautioned that the proposal, developed in secret by the National Security Council, still has not won final approval from the President and could well be changed slightly at the last minute.
NEWS
December 21, 1989 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush's lifting of economic sanctions against Panama on Wednesday is expected to provide some quick relief, but analysts said that it probably will take years for the country's economy to get back on its feet. The sanctions imposed in March, 1988, failed to squeeze Panama enough to force the ouster of dictator Manuel A. Noriega, as U.S. officials had hoped.
NEWS
September 7, 1989 | ART PINE, Times Staff Writer
Searching for new ways to protest Gen. Manuel A. Noriega's installation of another puppet government in Panama, the Bush Administration is exploring the possibility of imposing additional economic sanctions on the cash-squeezed Central American country.
NEWS
February 15, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush signed into law Wednesday the first $542 million of a $1-billion economic recovery package for Panama, with plans to finance the remaining $500 million in cash aid by diverting money from the defense budget. The measure, which was pushed through Congress in less than three weeks, is designed to help Panama revive its economy after 21 months of U.S. economic sanctions and the December invasion that toppled strongman Manuel A. Noriega.
NEWS
March 1, 1988 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan decided Monday to impose no immediate new economic sanctions against Panama, even though he has denounced the regime of Gen. Manuel A. Noriega for deposing Panama's civilian president and aiding international drug traffickers, Administration officials said. The White House is scheduled to announce the decision on Panama today when it releases a report on the role of several countries in efforts to combat drug trafficking.
NEWS
February 8, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congress gave formal approval Wednesday to the first installment of the Bush Administration's new $1 billion aid-to-Panama package, paving the way for signing by the President by the end of the week. Identical versions of the measure cleared both the House and Senate by voice vote, reflecting a desire by members of both parties to speed the aid package to invasion-racked Panama, which has been suffering since 1988 under U.S. economic sanctions.
NEWS
February 7, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congressional committees, moving with lightning speed, gave initial approval Tuesday to the first installment of the Bush Administration's $1-billion aid package for Panama, with plans to send the measure to the President for his signature as early as next week. In separate actions, the House Foreign Affairs and Senate Foreign Relations committees approved identical proposals providing $500 million to help rebuild public works and $42 million in emergency "humanitarian" aid.
NEWS
January 25, 1990 | ART PINE and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush today will announce a $1.1-billion package of aid to Panama designed to help the country recover from the pre-Christmas U.S. invasion and to resuscitate its crippled economy after 21 months under American economic sanctions. Officials cautioned that the proposal, developed in secret by the National Security Council, still has not won final approval from the President and could well be changed slightly at the last minute.
NEWS
December 21, 1989 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush's lifting of economic sanctions against Panama on Wednesday is expected to provide some quick relief, but analysts said that it probably will take years for the country's economy to get back on its feet. The sanctions imposed in March, 1988, failed to squeeze Panama enough to force the ouster of dictator Manuel A. Noriega, as U.S. officials had hoped.
NEWS
October 28, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Bush Administration on Friday designated Panamanian strongman Gen. Manuel A. Noriega an agent of Cuba, a declaration that could result in fines and jail terms for U.S. companies that do business with him. Noriega, his wife, Felicidad Sieiro de Noriega, and 32 companies, including several hotels and airport duty-free shops, are being added to the list of 134 firms and individuals already identified as Cuban agents in Panama, the Treasury Department announced.
NEWS
September 7, 1989 | ART PINE, Times Staff Writer
Searching for new ways to protest Gen. Manuel A. Noriega's installation of another puppet government in Panama, the Bush Administration is exploring the possibility of imposing additional economic sanctions on the cash-squeezed Central American country.
NEWS
February 15, 1990 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A federal money-laundering investigation has uncovered evidence that Gen. Manuel A. Noriega received millions of dollars in kickbacks from a coffee-smuggling scheme, according to sources close to the inquiry. The allegations involve contraband Colombian coffee that was shipped to Panama, rebagged as Panamanian coffee and exported to the United States and elsewhere. The scheme enabled the Colombian producers to evade export quotas and sell the coffee for a higher price.
NEWS
March 1, 1988 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan decided Monday to impose no immediate new economic sanctions against Panama, even though he has denounced the regime of Gen. Manuel A. Noriega for deposing Panama's civilian president and aiding international drug traffickers, Administration officials said. The White House is scheduled to announce the decision on Panama today when it releases a report on the role of several countries in efforts to combat drug trafficking.
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