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United States Trade Romania

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NEWS
July 16, 1987 | Associated Press
By a 53-44 vote, the Senate on Wednesday rejected a plan to ease provisions of a sweeping trade bill that would suspend Romania's most-favored-nation status. Sen. Christopher J. Dodd (D-Conn.) urged no change in the provisions adopted last Friday, which would impose a six-month suspension to pressure the Communist nation to soften a pattern of human rights abuses. He said that a newly released report from Amnesty International "details the deteriorating (situation) in Romania."
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NEWS
January 10, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The new government said Tuesday that it will seek most-favored-nation trading status with the United States as well as restoration of other privileges and ties. Ousted dictator Nicolae Ceausescu renounced the U.S. trade agreement in February, 1988, when it appeared that the U.S. Congress would not renew it because of human rights abuses by Ceausescu's regime. The Foreign Ministry said it is "empowered to nullify the abusive and unilateral Feb.
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NEWS
June 3, 1987
President Reagan extended most-favored-nation trade status to Romania, Hungary and China for another year. The President told Congress that improvements in emigration from Hungary and China warranted continuation of the special status, but he said the decision on Romania was made only after "careful deliberation." Washington uses the trade status as leverage on human rights, and Reagan noted that Romania has been under fire on this issue, particularly for its treatment of ethnic minorities.
NEWS
February 27, 1988 | Associated Press
The Romanian government, apparently weary of White House and congressional demands for a better human rights performance, has renounced American trade benefits given to Communist countries with good emigration policies, U.S. officials said Friday. As a result, Romania could lose up to $250 million in commerce with the United States, according to Romanian figures.
NEWS
February 27, 1988 | Associated Press
The Romanian government, apparently weary of White House and congressional demands for a better human rights performance, has renounced American trade benefits given to Communist countries with good emigration policies, U.S. officials said Friday. As a result, Romania could lose up to $250 million in commerce with the United States, according to Romanian figures.
NEWS
January 10, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The new government said Tuesday that it will seek most-favored-nation trading status with the United States as well as restoration of other privileges and ties. Ousted dictator Nicolae Ceausescu renounced the U.S. trade agreement in February, 1988, when it appeared that the U.S. Congress would not renew it because of human rights abuses by Ceausescu's regime. The Foreign Ministry said it is "empowered to nullify the abusive and unilateral Feb.
NEWS
July 16, 1987 | Associated Press
By a 53-44 vote, the Senate on Wednesday rejected a plan to ease provisions of a sweeping trade bill that would suspend Romania's most-favored-nation status. Sen. Christopher J. Dodd (D-Conn.) urged no change in the provisions adopted last Friday, which would impose a six-month suspension to pressure the Communist nation to soften a pattern of human rights abuses. He said that a newly released report from Amnesty International "details the deteriorating (situation) in Romania."
NEWS
June 3, 1987
President Reagan extended most-favored-nation trade status to Romania, Hungary and China for another year. The President told Congress that improvements in emigration from Hungary and China warranted continuation of the special status, but he said the decision on Romania was made only after "careful deliberation." Washington uses the trade status as leverage on human rights, and Reagan noted that Romania has been under fire on this issue, particularly for its treatment of ethnic minorities.
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