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BUSINESS
July 14, 1999 | Associated Press
Russia has agreed to limit its shipments of steel to the United States to avoid imposition of punitive American tariffs, U.S. officials said. The deal was signed after marathon bargaining talks in Paris. If an agreement had not been reached by Tuesday, Washington was set to impose the penalty tariffs, which would have resulted in an even steeper drop in demand for Russian steel in the United States.
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BUSINESS
January 29, 2000 | Bloomberg News
The Clinton administration probably will reject demands by Intel Corp., Unisys Corp. and other companies to relax export controls on a new, high-powered computer chip, industry executives and an administration official said. After months of lobbying by a computer industry group, President Clinton may not raise current computing-speed limits as much as the industry has sought on exports to countries such as China and Russia. The decision is expected to be announced Feb. 1.
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BUSINESS
September 1, 1998 | Reuters
Tyson Foods Inc. said it will record $196 million in fiscal fourth- quarter charges as it streamlines production at its poultry plants and accounts for exposure to troubled Russian and Asian economies, a figure in line with analyst expectations. The Springdale, Ark.-based poultry processor, whose fourth quarter ends Oct. 3, said last month it will close plants, cut its work force and write down goodwill.
BUSINESS
July 14, 1999 | Associated Press
Russia has agreed to limit its shipments of steel to the United States to avoid imposition of punitive American tariffs, U.S. officials said. The deal was signed after marathon bargaining talks in Paris. If an agreement had not been reached by Tuesday, Washington was set to impose the penalty tariffs, which would have resulted in an even steeper drop in demand for Russian steel in the United States.
BUSINESS
February 29, 1996
Russia Holding Fast on U.S. Chicken Ban: Deputy Prime Minister Alexander Zaveryukha said his country can do without the poultry, according to the Russian news agency Interfax. The Russian government, citing health concerns, decided several weeks ago to halt imports that weren't already in the pipeline, meaning the flow will dry up in mid-March. Zaveryukha described a letter he received from Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman in response to the ban as "rather condescending," Interfax reported.
BUSINESS
March 6, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Russia Tells U.S. It Won't Ban Poultry Imports: U.S. Vice President Al Gore said he has received assurances from Russian Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin that U.S. poultry exports will continue to Russia without interruption. In a statement released by the vice president's office, Gore also said that Chernomyrdin confirmed that a threatened March 16 stoppage of poultry imports from the United States will not take place.
BUSINESS
March 26, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Russia Agrees to Resume Imports of U.S. Poultry: Vice President Al Gore also said that Russia will shortly begin issuing new import licenses. Under the agreement, Russia formally recognized that the U.S. inspection system and American poultry itself are fully acceptable for the Russian market. The accord clarifies U.S. compliance with Russian requirements and puts in place bilateral practices for U.S. plant approval, including Russian spot checks of U.S. poultry plants.
BUSINESS
April 1, 1994 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Technology companies large and small said Thursday that they stand to profit from the Clinton Administration's decision to ease limits on sales of some computers and telecommunications gear to former communist bloc nations.
BUSINESS
July 4, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Chevron Unit in Pact to Buy Russian Crude: Chevron International said it signed a framework agreement to buy about 70,000 barrels of oil a day from LUKoil, Russia's largest oil company. Chevron, based in San Francisco, said it expects to buy up to 180 million barrels of Urals Blend crude for the export market under the eight-year contract. On Friday, Chevron stock ended up 50 cents at $42.375 on the New York Stock Exchange.
NEWS
July 22, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. Energy Department officials and Victor N. Mikhailov, the head of Russia's Ministry of Atomic Energy, have discussed the potential sale of tons of weapons-grade Russian uranium for possible use in U.S. nuclear power plants, an official with a U.S. environmental group said. Thomas B.
BUSINESS
November 8, 1998 | JAMES FLANIGAN
The protests of the American steel industry over a wave of imports from Japan, Russia, Brazil, South Korea and other nations are justified this time. Furthermore, the issue here goes well beyond steel--an industry that now employs only 163,000 workers, a tiny fraction of the U.S. labor force. The steel imports are part of a general unloading of goods this year by producers in Asia, Russia and Latin America, which are shipping to the U.S.
BUSINESS
September 1, 1998 | Reuters
Tyson Foods Inc. said it will record $196 million in fiscal fourth- quarter charges as it streamlines production at its poultry plants and accounts for exposure to troubled Russian and Asian economies, a figure in line with analyst expectations. The Springdale, Ark.-based poultry processor, whose fourth quarter ends Oct. 3, said last month it will close plants, cut its work force and write down goodwill.
NEWS
October 17, 1997 | JEFF BRAZIL and STEVE BERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Escalating her campaign against the importation of assault weapons, U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein on Thursday appealed to the leaders of Russia, Greece and Bulgaria to prevent the export of thousands of the rapid-fire guns to the United States. "These are exactly the kind of weapons many Americans are trying to keep off our streets," the California Democrat wrote in letters to Russian President Boris Yeltsin, Greek Prime Minister Konstandinos Simitis and Bulgarian Prime Minister Ivan Kostov.
BUSINESS
June 14, 1997 | (Bloomberg News)
Hughes Corp. said it has reached a preliminary agreement to supply telecommunications satellites to Russia. Negotiations between Hughes and Russian Satellite Communications Co. are expected to be complete within a few months, Hughes spokesman Don O'Neil said. Further details weren't provided. If a contract is signed, the Westchester-based subsidiary of General Motors Corp. is expected to build as many as three satellites to replace aging ones controlled by the Russian company.
BUSINESS
March 26, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Russia Agrees to Resume Imports of U.S. Poultry: Vice President Al Gore also said that Russia will shortly begin issuing new import licenses. Under the agreement, Russia formally recognized that the U.S. inspection system and American poultry itself are fully acceptable for the Russian market. The accord clarifies U.S. compliance with Russian requirements and puts in place bilateral practices for U.S. plant approval, including Russian spot checks of U.S. poultry plants.
BUSINESS
March 6, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Russia Tells U.S. It Won't Ban Poultry Imports: U.S. Vice President Al Gore said he has received assurances from Russian Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin that U.S. poultry exports will continue to Russia without interruption. In a statement released by the vice president's office, Gore also said that Chernomyrdin confirmed that a threatened March 16 stoppage of poultry imports from the United States will not take place.
BUSINESS
February 29, 1996
Russia Holding Fast on U.S. Chicken Ban: Deputy Prime Minister Alexander Zaveryukha said his country can do without the poultry, according to the Russian news agency Interfax. The Russian government, citing health concerns, decided several weeks ago to halt imports that weren't already in the pipeline, meaning the flow will dry up in mid-March. Zaveryukha described a letter he received from Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman in response to the ban as "rather condescending," Interfax reported.
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