Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Trade Saudi Arabia
IN THE NEWS

United States Trade Saudi Arabia

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
November 11, 1988 | From Reuters
Saudi Arabia and Texaco Inc. signed a $1.8-billion deal Thursday creating a joint venture to refine, distribute and market oil products in 23 American states. The deal gives Saudi Arabia, the world's biggest crude oil exporter, access to the largest oil market in the world and is a major step toward integrating its operations from the well to the gas pump.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
August 10, 1999 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Noting that most U.S. oil companies oppose the case, the Commerce Department refused Monday to investigate complaints that oil imported from Mexico, Saudi Arabia, Venezuela and Iraq is unfairly priced and hurts domestic producers. The government's decision averts an inquiry sought by small U.S. oil producers that could have led to duties on almost half the crude shipped to the U.S. It sent gasoline prices soaring.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
August 10, 1999 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Noting that most U.S. oil companies oppose the case, the Commerce Department refused Monday to investigate complaints that oil imported from Mexico, Saudi Arabia, Venezuela and Iraq is unfairly priced and hurts domestic producers. The government's decision averts an inquiry sought by small U.S. oil producers that could have led to duties on almost half the crude shipped to the U.S. It sent gasoline prices soaring.
BUSINESS
May 5, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The national airline of Saudi Arabia has decided to buy 46 Boeing jetliners and 15 McDonnell Douglas MD-11 jets under its previously announced plan to purchase $6 billion of U.S.-made aircraft, sources in the Saudi capital of Riyadh said Wednesday. The proposal is now subject to approval by Saudi Arabia's Cabinet, headed by King Fahd. Neither St. Louis-based McDonnell Douglas nor Seattle-based Boeing would comment on the reports. Both cited their policies of having customers announce new orders.
BUSINESS
May 5, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The national airline of Saudi Arabia has decided to buy 46 Boeing jetliners and 15 McDonnell Douglas MD-11 jets under its previously announced plan to purchase $6 billion of U.S.-made aircraft, sources in the Saudi capital of Riyadh said Wednesday. The proposal is now subject to approval by Saudi Arabia's Cabinet, headed by King Fahd. Neither St. Louis-based McDonnell Douglas nor Seattle-based Boeing would comment on the reports. Both cited their policies of having customers announce new orders.
BUSINESS
September 12, 1989 | THOMAS W. LIPPMAN, The Washington Post
Saudi Arabia, looking for extra cash, and the United States, looking for cut-rate oil to fill the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, are discussing a novel Saudi proposal to lease crude oil to this country, government officials said Monday. A long-term lease would enable the Saudis to earn revenue for surplus oil that they cannot sell because of production quotas adopted by the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries.
BUSINESS
April 28, 1994 | ROBIN WRIGHT and JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton, again trying to persuade Saudi Arabia to buy U.S. products, called on its government to award a telecommunications contract to AT&T valued at up to $4 billion, Secretary of State Warren Christopher said Wednesday. The desert kingdom plans to update and expand its aging telephone system, and AT&T is vying with telecommunications suppliers from Europe, Japan and Canada for the lucrative contract.
BUSINESS
March 21, 1992 | From Associated Press
McDonnell Douglas Corp., its subcontractors and unions have joined together to put pressure on the U.S. government to approve the sale of 72 F-15 jet fighters to Saudi Arabia. "Who needs 40,000 highly skilled jobs? We do!" reads an advertisement the group began running Thursday in three Capitol Hill publications.
BUSINESS
February 18, 1994 | From Associated Press
The $6-billion U.S.-Saudi aircraft deal announced by President Clinton on Wednesday might be in violation of recently concluded world trade talks, according to Airbus Industrie, the European plane manufacturers consortium. If the United States allowed Saudi Arabia to reschedule payments on military equipment orders as an incentive to buy the planes, the deal would violate GATT, the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, Airbus spokesman Sean Lee said.
BUSINESS
April 28, 1994 | ROBIN WRIGHT and JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton, again trying to persuade Saudi Arabia to buy U.S. products, called on its government to award a telecommunications contract to AT&T valued at up to $4 billion, Secretary of State Warren Christopher said Wednesday. The desert kingdom plans to update and expand its aging telephone system, and AT&T is vying with telecommunications suppliers from Europe, Japan and Canada for the lucrative contract.
BUSINESS
February 18, 1994 | From Associated Press
The $6-billion U.S.-Saudi aircraft deal announced by President Clinton on Wednesday might be in violation of recently concluded world trade talks, according to Airbus Industrie, the European plane manufacturers consortium. If the United States allowed Saudi Arabia to reschedule payments on military equipment orders as an incentive to buy the planes, the deal would violate GATT, the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, Airbus spokesman Sean Lee said.
BUSINESS
October 4, 1993 | From Reuters
U.S. Transportation Secretary Federico Pena said Sunday that he had "very productive" talks with King Fahd of Saudi Arabia on a possible sale of American civilian aircraft worth $6 billion. The carrier Saudia's plans to renew its fleet with some 60 aircraft has placed the four-nation European consortium Airbus Industrie and American firms Boeing Co. and McDonnell Douglas Corp. in close competition for the deal.
NEWS
August 20, 1993 | JAMES F. PELTZ and JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After direct intervention by President Clinton, Saudi Arabia plans to buy $6 billion worth of new passenger jets from McDonnell Douglas Corp. and Boeing Co., White House and Saudi officials said Thursday. Clinton took the unusual step of calling Saudi Arabia's King Fahd on Tuesday to help secure the coveted sale, which is a major lift for the U.S. aircraft industry and especially for McDonnell's slumping commercial jetliner business in Long Beach.
BUSINESS
March 21, 1992 | From Associated Press
McDonnell Douglas Corp., its subcontractors and unions have joined together to put pressure on the U.S. government to approve the sale of 72 F-15 jet fighters to Saudi Arabia. "Who needs 40,000 highly skilled jobs? We do!" reads an advertisement the group began running Thursday in three Capitol Hill publications.
BUSINESS
February 28, 1992
Kofax Image Products Inc. said Thursday that it has begun shipping more than $500,000 worth of document processing equipment to the Saudi Arabia Monetary Agency. The Saudi agency plans to use the equipment to manage and reduce paperwork by manipulating documents with personal computers.
BUSINESS
February 28, 1992
Kofax Image Products Inc. said Thursday that it has begun shipping more than $500,000 worth of document processing equipment to the Saudi Arabia Monetary Agency. The Saudi agency plans to use the equipment to manage and reduce paperwork by manipulating documents with personal computers.
BUSINESS
June 13, 1990 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Saudi Arabia gears up to build more schools, erect steel plants and expand its hospital facilities, U.S. companies will have increased opportunity in that market--but not if they don't pay more attention to local market needs and social customs, several members of a Saudi business delegation said Tuesday. Abdallah Dabbagh, secretary general of the Saudi Council of Chambers of Commerce and Industry in Riyadh, said U.S.
BUSINESS
August 16, 1990 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Industry sources said Wednesday that Saudi Arabia will cut by 15% its crude oil allocations in September to large customers, including major U.S. oil companies. But analysts said it is not clear whether the cut will mean that customers receive less crude oil than they need. The allocation cut was taken by some observers as a sign of an unexpected delay in the long-awaited increase in Saudi oil production to help offset a 4.
BUSINESS
June 13, 1990 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Saudi Arabia gears up to build more schools, erect steel plants and expand its hospital facilities, U.S. companies will have increased opportunity in that market--but not if they don't pay more attention to local market needs and social customs, several members of a Saudi business delegation said Tuesday. Abdallah Dabbagh, secretary general of the Saudi Council of Chambers of Commerce and Industry in Riyadh, said U.S.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|