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United States Trade Singapore

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BUSINESS
February 28, 1995
Fluor Daniel Inc. said Monday it has received a $100-million contract to design and build a chemicals plant in Singapore for Hoechst Celanese Chemical Group. The plant, to be completed in mid-1997, will produce vinyl acetate monomer, a chemical used in paint, paper, textiles and packaging. Fluor Daniel, an engineering and construction firm, is the principal unit of Irvine-based Fluor Corp. Hoechst Celanese, a Dallas-based chemicals firm, is part of Germany's Hoechst AG.
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BUSINESS
October 14, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Trade Pact With United States Signed: After signing a general agreement on trade talks with members of the Assn. of Southeast Asian nations, the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative will now begin to negotiate specific pacts designed to expand American economic ties with Singapore and the other nations in the group. U.S.
BUSINESS
February 28, 1995
Fluor Daniel Inc. said Monday it has received a $100-million contract to design and build a chemicals plant in Singapore for Hoechst Celanese Chemical Group. The plant, to be completed in mid-1997, will produce vinyl acetate monomer, a chemical used in paint, paper, textiles and packaging. Fluor Daniel, an engineering and construction firm, is the principal unit of Irvine-based Fluor Corp. Hoechst Celanese, a Dallas-based chemicals firm, is part of Germany's Hoechst AG.
BUSINESS
December 5, 1990 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Personal computer maker AST Research Inc. has established sales offices in Singapore and Taiwan as part of an effort to boost sales in the Far East. "The opening of AST's Singapore and Taiwan offices reflects the company's commitment to the Pacific Rim's personal computer marketplace and its continued global strategy to gain worldwide market share," said Tom Yuen, AST's chief operating officer. "AST's local proximity will allow it to keep pace with the region's rapidly growing computer industry."
NEWS
January 4, 1992 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush met today with Prime Minister Goh Chok Tang in a visit designed in large part to emphasize the importance of Southeast Asia as a market for U.S. industry. Bush also announced, as expected, that the two governments had reached agreement to work toward a plan to move some U.S. naval operations to Singapore from Subic Bay in the Philippines by the end of the year.
NEWS
January 29, 1988 | STUART AUERBACH, The Washington Post
A Cabinet-level committee has recommended that President Reagan withdraw special trade privileges enjoyed by four fast-growing Asian nations whose soaring trade surpluses with the United States have created a serious economic challenge to the Administration. Sources said the President is expected to approve the decision of the White House Economic Policy Council, which could be announced as early as Saturday and would take effect next January.
BUSINESS
February 8, 1988 | NANCY YOSHIHARA, Times Staff Writer
When Richard V. Sallis sits down to plan his company's product line a month from now, his 1989 toy line may have a new cost factor: increased duties on some products from Hong Kong. Sallis, vice president of marketing for Playmates Inc. in La Mirada, will have to figure out how to accommodate the expense, and one solution may be to shift some production to China. Meanwhile, Emily Rodriguez is fielding calls from Esprit de Corp.'
NEWS
January 4, 1992 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush met today with Prime Minister Goh Chok Tang in a visit designed in large part to emphasize the importance of Southeast Asia as a market for U.S. industry. Bush also announced, as expected, that the two governments had reached agreement to work toward a plan to move some U.S. naval operations to Singapore from Subic Bay in the Philippines by the end of the year.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Trade Pact With United States Signed: After signing a general agreement on trade talks with members of the Assn. of Southeast Asian nations, the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative will now begin to negotiate specific pacts designed to expand American economic ties with Singapore and the other nations in the group. U.S.
BUSINESS
December 5, 1990 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Personal computer maker AST Research Inc. has established sales offices in Singapore and Taiwan as part of an effort to boost sales in the Far East. "The opening of AST's Singapore and Taiwan offices reflects the company's commitment to the Pacific Rim's personal computer marketplace and its continued global strategy to gain worldwide market share," said Tom Yuen, AST's chief operating officer. "AST's local proximity will allow it to keep pace with the region's rapidly growing computer industry."
BUSINESS
February 8, 1988 | NANCY YOSHIHARA, Times Staff Writer
When Richard V. Sallis sits down to plan his company's product line a month from now, his 1989 toy line may have a new cost factor: increased duties on some products from Hong Kong. Sallis, vice president of marketing for Playmates Inc. in La Mirada, will have to figure out how to accommodate the expense, and one solution may be to shift some production to China. Meanwhile, Emily Rodriguez is fielding calls from Esprit de Corp.'
BUSINESS
January 30, 1988 | TOM REDBURN, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan, going along with a Cabinet-level recommendation, agreed Friday to remove Singapore, Hong Kong, Taiwan and South Korea from the list of developing nations eligible to export a wide variety of goods to the United States without paying duties. The move, which goes into effect in about a year, is expected to have only a relatively minor effect on consumers, since it would add less than $500 million in cost to products from the four rapidly growing Asian countries.
NEWS
January 29, 1988 | STUART AUERBACH, The Washington Post
A Cabinet-level committee has recommended that President Reagan withdraw special trade privileges enjoyed by four fast-growing Asian nations whose soaring trade surpluses with the United States have created a serious economic challenge to the Administration. Sources said the President is expected to approve the decision of the White House Economic Policy Council, which could be announced as early as Saturday and would take effect next January.
BUSINESS
January 30, 1988 | TOM REDBURN, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan, going along with a Cabinet-level recommendation, agreed Friday to remove Singapore, Hong Kong, Taiwan and South Korea from the list of developing nations eligible to export a wide variety of goods to the United States without paying duties. The move, which goes into effect in about a year, is expected to have only a relatively minor effect on consumers, since it would add less than $500 million in cost to products from the four rapidly growing Asian countries.
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