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BUSINESS
August 26, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S., South Africa Sign Business Pacts: Energy Secretary Hazel O'Leary and her South African counterpart, Pik Botha, presided over a ceremony in Pretoria where American and local executives signed agreements worth at least $50 million. O'Leary and Botha signed four business, energy and economic agreements between their countries that will lead to the creation of almost 2,000 jobs. The agreements form part of Washington's support of black economic empowerment in post-apartheid South Africa.
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BUSINESS
August 26, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S., South Africa Sign Business Pacts: Energy Secretary Hazel O'Leary and her South African counterpart, Pik Botha, presided over a ceremony in Pretoria where American and local executives signed agreements worth at least $50 million. O'Leary and Botha signed four business, energy and economic agreements between their countries that will lead to the creation of almost 2,000 jobs. The agreements form part of Washington's support of black economic empowerment in post-apartheid South Africa.
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NEWS
February 11, 1990 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While President Bush joined other U.S. leaders Saturday in hailing the imminent release of black activist Nelson R. Mandela, a political storm already was brewing over whether the move warrants relaxation of U.S. sanctions against South Africa. From his retreat at Camp David, Bush telephoned South African President Frederik W. de Klerk and "pledged U.S. willingness to help create a climate for negotiations" between the nation's white minority leadership and its black majority.
BUSINESS
November 25, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Commerce Secretary Ronald H. Brown said the mission he will lead this week will help stabilize Pretoria's emerging democracy and open a valuable new market for U.S. exporters. "Economic growth is the single most effective path to political stability," Brown told reporters. On Tuesday, President Clinton lifted the last of the U.S. economic sanctions against South Africa and urged state and local governments to do the same.
NEWS
February 9, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration anticipates that South Africa will comply with the standards set by Congress for lifting U.S. economic sanctions by the end of this year, according to a senior U.S. official. The official, who talked to a small group of reporters Wednesday on the understanding that he would not be identified by name, said it now seems clear that sanctions imposed by the United States and other nations played a role in the decision by South African President Frederik W.
NEWS
August 12, 1988 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
The Democratic-controlled House, in a move that the Reagan Administration contends will undermine peace talks in southern Africa, Thursday passed a sweeping anti-apartheid bill that would virtually halt trade and cancel all U.S. investments in South Africa.
NEWS
April 28, 1988 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
Liberals in Congress, disappointed by the results of limited economic sanctions imposed against Pretoria's white-minority government in 1986, are mounting a new effort to legislate an end to almost all American business dealings in South Africa. As an initial step in the process, the House Foreign Affairs Committee, a panel dominated by liberal Democrats, is expected to approve legislation today that would ban virtually all U.S. trade with--as well as investment in--South Africa within a year.
NEWS
May 13, 1988
A group of liberal senators introduced legislation to impose tougher U.S. economic sanctions on South Africa, including full divestiture and a nearly total trade embargo. The bill, similar to one the House Foreign Affairs Committee approved last week, would ban most trade with South Africa, require Americans to end all investment in South Africa and ban all bank loans to that country, including loan renewals and extensions.
NEWS
November 21, 1993
Allen Herbert, the San Pedro man with a plan to electrify underdeveloped African countries, will be part of the U.S. delegation to visit South Africa this week. Herbert is one of 25 business leaders who were invited to join U.S. Secretary of Commerce Ronald H. Brown and other government officials in this country's first trade mission to South Africa since President Clinton called for lifting sanctions against South Africa in September. The delegation will leave Friday and return Dec. 1.
NEWS
June 17, 1993 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just over a mountain range from the sea, on a dusty plain beneath rouge-tinted hills, a few hundred white South Africans have long nurtured the world's largest ostrich farms--and chafed under years of sanctions that barred them from the American market. But now, their ostrich-skin cowboy boots, with price tags of $1,000 and up, are available across the United States. So are billfolds, golf bags and pocketbooks made from the exotic, pockmarked skin of South Africa's gawky, contrary bird.
BUSINESS
March 4, 1993 | From Associated Press
Sixteen U.S. companies have opened offices or otherwise established economic links to South Africa in the last 1 1/2 years, reversing the "disinvestment" trend of the late 1980s, a research firm said Wednesday. The Investor Responsibility Research Center Inc. in Washington said the new investments were facilitated by then-President Bush's 1991 executive order repealing a ban on new U.S. investment in South Africa. That ban was included in the Comprehensive Anti-Apartheid Act of 1986.
BUSINESS
February 26, 1993 | ALEXEI BARRIONUEVO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Standing near the hors d'oeuvres table at a downtown Los Angeles hotel, dapper South African businessman Dries Groenewald downplayed the importance of the first trade mission from his country to the United States since 1986. "You cannot just charge in and expect things to happen," said Groenewald, chairman of Paradigm, a South African manufacturer of computer software.
NEWS
July 15, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just hours after the United States imposed sanctions on Pretoria back in 1986, businessman Reuben Sive learned to his horror that 500 tons of his South African canned goods were stranded on ships in half a dozen American ports. U.S. Customs agents had refused entry for the shipment, and "it all just lay there," Sive remembered. That was midnight, Oct. 6, 1986.
NEWS
June 26, 1991 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush told skeptical members of the Congressional Black Caucus on Tuesday that he may have little choice but to restore open trade with South Africa, insisting that his hands are tied by the sanctions law approved by Congress four years ago. "I don't have much flexibility," the President said at the start of a meeting at which black lawmakers pressed him not to lift the limits on U.S.
NEWS
August 20, 1989 | From The Washington Post
Nearly three years after they were imposed by Congress, punitive trade sanctions against South Africa have been only partially enforced because the State Department failed to provide the U.S. Customs Service with a list of South African products barred from entering the country, the General Accounting Office said in a report released Saturday.
NEWS
January 17, 1989 | Associated Press
Gov. Michael S. Dukakis said Monday he will order the Massachusetts executive branch to stop making purchases from companies with ties to South Africa. "From this point forward, the message will go out loud and clear from at least one state government that we are not going to do business with people who do business with that government and that country," Dukakis said at a Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day breakfast.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1990 | TONY MARCANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A South African national accused of illegally importing nine skins from a threatened species of zebra with the intent to unlawfully peddle them in Orange County was acquitted by a federal court jury Thursday of importing and selling the skins, but found guilty of making a false statement to a government official. Although the prosecution presented evidence that Wallace Charles Venter, 37, allegedly sold one of the skins to an undercover agent of the U.S.
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