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United States Trade Syria

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BUSINESS
January 23, 1997 | DAVID B. OTTAWAY, WASHINGTON POST
Four months after President Clinton signed a law last year barring financial transactions between American corporations and countries accused of supporting terrorism, the administration quietly exempted one such country--Sudan--where Occidental Petroleum Corp. was seeking a stake in a $930-million oil deal, according to federal officials and documents.
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BUSINESS
June 20, 1998 | Associated Press
Gateway Inc. agreed to pay a fine of $402,000 to settle charges of illegally shipping personal computers to Iran, Syria and 14 other countries subject to U.S. export controls. The Commerce Department said Gateway made the 1992 and 1993 sales even though the North Sioux City, S.D., company knew they required export licenses and in many cases falsified shipment declarations. Computer sales to most countries outside the NATO alliance are restricted, and U.S.
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NEWS
August 26, 1988
The United States will review the duty-free privileges of six countries accused of abusing workers' rights, Trade Representative Clayton K. Yeutter announced. The six include Israel, which has been charged with violating the rights of Palestinian workers, and Syria, Burma, Haiti, Liberia and Malaysia.
BUSINESS
January 23, 1997 | DAVID B. OTTAWAY, WASHINGTON POST
Four months after President Clinton signed a law last year barring financial transactions between American corporations and countries accused of supporting terrorism, the administration quietly exempted one such country--Sudan--where Occidental Petroleum Corp. was seeking a stake in a $930-million oil deal, according to federal officials and documents.
NEWS
August 28, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The U.S. government has approved the sale of more than $300 million in high-technology items to Iran and Syria in recent years, even though it says those countries support terrorism, documents indicate. The Commerce Department used loopholes in federal regulations to legally approve the exports, some of which had potential military use, documents obtained by the Associated Press show. From late 1987 through September, 1990, U.S.
BUSINESS
June 20, 1998 | Associated Press
Gateway Inc. agreed to pay a fine of $402,000 to settle charges of illegally shipping personal computers to Iran, Syria and 14 other countries subject to U.S. export controls. The Commerce Department said Gateway made the 1992 and 1993 sales even though the North Sioux City, S.D., company knew they required export licenses and in many cases falsified shipment declarations. Computer sales to most countries outside the NATO alliance are restricted, and U.S.
BUSINESS
January 23, 1997 | DAVID B. OTTAWAY, WASHINGTON POST
Four months after President Clinton signed a law last year barring financial transactions between American corporations and countries accused of supporting terrorism, the administration quietly exempted one such country--Sudan--where Occidental Petroleum Corp. was seeking a stake in a $930-million oil deal, according to federal officials and documents.
NEWS
October 28, 1987
A Philadelphia man who pleaded guilty to conspiring to sell military equipment to Syria was sentenced to 20 months to five years in prison. Kevin Gilday, 37, told U.S. District Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson that he had acted because of financial interests, not because of pro-Arab ideology as the U.S. government alleged. Gilday pleaded guilty Sept. 11 to conspiring to sell aviation navigation equipment to Syria in violation of the Arms Export Control Act. It was never delivered.
BUSINESS
January 23, 1997 | DAVID B. OTTAWAY, WASHINGTON POST
Four months after President Clinton signed a law last year barring financial transactions between American corporations and countries accused of supporting terrorism, the administration quietly exempted one such country--Sudan--where Occidental Petroleum Corp. was seeking a stake in a $930-million oil deal, according to federal officials and documents.
NEWS
August 28, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The U.S. government has approved the sale of more than $300 million in high-technology items to Iran and Syria in recent years, even though it says those countries support terrorism, documents indicate. The Commerce Department used loopholes in federal regulations to legally approve the exports, some of which had potential military use, documents obtained by the Associated Press show. From late 1987 through September, 1990, U.S.
NEWS
August 26, 1988
The United States will review the duty-free privileges of six countries accused of abusing workers' rights, Trade Representative Clayton K. Yeutter announced. The six include Israel, which has been charged with violating the rights of Palestinian workers, and Syria, Burma, Haiti, Liberia and Malaysia.
NEWS
October 28, 1987
A Philadelphia man who pleaded guilty to conspiring to sell military equipment to Syria was sentenced to 20 months to five years in prison. Kevin Gilday, 37, told U.S. District Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson that he had acted because of financial interests, not because of pro-Arab ideology as the U.S. government alleged. Gilday pleaded guilty Sept. 11 to conspiring to sell aviation navigation equipment to Syria in violation of the Arms Export Control Act. It was never delivered.
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