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United States Trade Taiwan

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BUSINESS
December 21, 1988 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
Toyota said Tuesday that it plans to export U.S.-built cars to Taiwan over the next few months, joining a growing list of American and Japanese auto makers that are taking advantage of favorable exchange rates to expand overseas sales of American-produced cars. Beginning in January, Toyota will ship 300 Camry compact models each month to Taiwan from its new Georgetown, Ky., assembly plant, which opened this fall.
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BUSINESS
February 21, 1998 | Reuters
The U.S. said it had reached a market-opening agreement with Taiwan that will promote Taipei's drive to join the World Trade Organization. "This comprehensive agreement will dramatically open Taiwan's markets to U.S. agricultural products, services and industrial goods," U.S. Trade Representative Charlene Barshefsky said in a statement. The U.S. is the 24th of 26 countries to negotiate bilateral trade agreements with Taiwan as part of its bid to join the WTO.
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NEWS
April 12, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first American trade sanctions aimed at protecting endangered species, the Clinton Administration said Monday that it will impose penalties against Taiwan for its failure to halt the use of tiger and rhinoceros products. The sanctions, the first against Taiwan for any reason, will bar American imports of wildlife products from the Asian nation. Their use reflects the growing attention being paid to environmental issues in world trade.
BUSINESS
February 5, 1997 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Taiwan acceded to U.S. pressure and agreed in principle to sign a broad investment pact in exchange for Washington's commitment to help it join two international groups, officials said. Under the bilateral pact, Taiwan would be obliged to open its service market widely, granting almost unrestricted access to banking and other financial services, Taiwan trade officials said. The U.S. side committed itself to helping Taiwan join two international organizations, the U.S.-Japan Semiconductor Assn.
BUSINESS
February 21, 1998 | Reuters
The U.S. said it had reached a market-opening agreement with Taiwan that will promote Taipei's drive to join the World Trade Organization. "This comprehensive agreement will dramatically open Taiwan's markets to U.S. agricultural products, services and industrial goods," U.S. Trade Representative Charlene Barshefsky said in a statement. The U.S. is the 24th of 26 countries to negotiate bilateral trade agreements with Taiwan as part of its bid to join the WTO.
BUSINESS
February 5, 1997 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Taiwan acceded to U.S. pressure and agreed in principle to sign a broad investment pact in exchange for Washington's commitment to help it join two international groups, officials said. Under the bilateral pact, Taiwan would be obliged to open its service market widely, granting almost unrestricted access to banking and other financial services, Taiwan trade officials said. The U.S. side committed itself to helping Taiwan join two international organizations, the U.S.-Japan Semiconductor Assn.
BUSINESS
May 11, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Taiwan Airlines to Buy 4 MD-90 Jets: Three airlines affiliated with Taiwan's Evergreen Group will sign an agreement to jointly purchase four McDonnell Douglas MD-90 passengers jets. The Economic Daily News, Taiwan's business daily, reported the deal was worth $140 million. The Evergreen Group, which includes Evergreen Marine and EVA, is a group of transportation companies controlled by Taiwanese billionaire Chang Yung-fa.
NEWS
July 6, 1994 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration is preparing policy changes that will give the government of Taiwan greater leeway in dealing with the United States than it has had for 15 years, Administration officials say. The changes, which await final approval by President Clinton and could be announced in the next couple of weeks, would ease some restrictions imposed on Taiwan when the United States established diplomatic relations with its enemy, the People's Republic of China.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Tariff-Cutting Pact With U.S. Ratified: The Cabinet approved the agreement to cut tariffs by an average of 12.5% on 325 industrial goods and by an average of 17.5% on 154 farm products, the Economic Ministry said. Officials said the cuts, which require Parliament approval, will help Taiwan in its bid to enter the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade.
BUSINESS
May 11, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Taiwan Airlines to Buy 4 MD-90 Jets: Three airlines affiliated with Taiwan's Evergreen Group will sign an agreement to jointly purchase four McDonnell Douglas MD-90 passengers jets. The Economic Daily News, Taiwan's business daily, reported the deal was worth $140 million. The Evergreen Group, which includes Evergreen Marine and EVA, is a group of transportation companies controlled by Taiwanese billionaire Chang Yung-fa.
BUSINESS
February 11, 1996 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Tensions between China and Taiwan and by extension the United States now threaten serious problems for world financial markets, for the development of Asia and even for the U.S. presidential election. Trouble can be avoided if China and Taiwan stop goading each other and if the United States stops demonizing China as a threat and sees it for what it is, a country poorer than most experts and U.S. government rhetoric make it out to be.
NEWS
November 30, 1994 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration announced Tuesday that it will send a Cabinet-level delegation to Taiwan early next month, a move welcomed by authorities here as "an important breakthrough" in relations. The December visit by Transportation Secretary Federico Pena to attend a U.S.-Taiwan business conference will mark only the second time since 1979 that a Cabinet member has traveled officially to Taiwan, which is formally known as the Republic of China on Taiwan.
NEWS
September 20, 1994 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five high-level dignitaries from Taiwan, a country where the sale of rare animal parts is commonplace, visited an exotic animal breeding center Monday to learn how the center is trying to save endangered leopards and tigers.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Tariff-Cutting Pact With U.S. Ratified: The Cabinet approved the agreement to cut tariffs by an average of 12.5% on 325 industrial goods and by an average of 17.5% on 154 farm products, the Economic Ministry said. Officials said the cuts, which require Parliament approval, will help Taiwan in its bid to enter the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade.
NEWS
July 6, 1994 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration is preparing policy changes that will give the government of Taiwan greater leeway in dealing with the United States than it has had for 15 years, Administration officials say. The changes, which await final approval by President Clinton and could be announced in the next couple of weeks, would ease some restrictions imposed on Taiwan when the United States established diplomatic relations with its enemy, the People's Republic of China.
NEWS
April 12, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first American trade sanctions aimed at protecting endangered species, the Clinton Administration said Monday that it will impose penalties against Taiwan for its failure to halt the use of tiger and rhinoceros products. The sanctions, the first against Taiwan for any reason, will bar American imports of wildlife products from the Asian nation. Their use reflects the growing attention being paid to environmental issues in world trade.
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