Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Trade Thailand
IN THE NEWS

United States Trade Thailand

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
July 28, 1990 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Commerce Secretary Robert A. Mosbacher, in a push to expand the market for U.S. exports, is escorting a party of chief executives from seven U.S. corporations to Indonesia and Thailand next week to meet with government officials and business executives there. The visit is part of Mosbacher's 10-day swing through Asia, which includes stops in Hong Kong and Singapore and is his first trip to Southeast Asia since taking over the Department of Commerce last year.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
August 12, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. Helps With Trade: The U.S. Export-Import Bank has approved $127 million in concessional financing to help support exports of U.S. goods to Thailand. The move is part of an effort by U.S. officials to press for greater discipline in limiting the use of tied aid for commercial advantage, the Ex-Imbank said in a statement. The bank will extend $43.8 million from its "tied aid credit fund" and will guarantee an $83.2-million commercial bank loan for 10 years.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 17, 1991 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States will end its $18-million-a-year wildlife and wildlife products trade with Thailand at the end of this month because the Bangkok government has failed to comply with an international treaty controlling trafficking in endangered species, Interior Secretary Manuel Lujan Jr. said Tuesday. U.S.
BUSINESS
August 12, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. Helps With Trade: The U.S. Export-Import Bank has approved $127 million in concessional financing to help support exports of U.S. goods to Thailand. The move is part of an effort by U.S. officials to press for greater discipline in limiting the use of tied aid for commercial advantage, the Ex-Imbank said in a statement. The bank will extend $43.8 million from its "tied aid credit fund" and will guarantee an $83.2-million commercial bank loan for 10 years.
BUSINESS
March 6, 1991 | Leslie Berkman / Times Staff Writer
DDI-Thai Pact: Disease Detection International said that Bangkok RIA Co. Ltd., Thailand's largest reference medical laboratory, has agreed to market the company's rapid diagnostic test kits for pregnancy and infectious diseases. H. Thad Morris, DDI's president and chief executive, said the three-year distribution agreement was signed by Bangkok RIA's President Ninlawan Pichayayothin during her visit last week to DDI's Irvine headquarters.
BUSINESS
May 13, 1987
The Thai government approved a controversial change to curb its lively market in pirated music and videotapes. The change will be debated in Parliament soon. The move is in response to U.S. threats to eliminate Thailand's rights to ship goods into the United States at a low tariff rate. Thailand's Copyright Act of 1978 protects books and works of art but excludes films, music and computer software.
BUSINESS
March 14, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS JR., Times Staff Writer
On Bangkok's Silom Road, the city's most fashionable shopping district, pushcart vendors peddle fakes on the sidewalk just a few quick steps from the real stuff in upscale boutiques. Cartier watches, Lee jeans and Lionel Richie tapes--every one a counterfeit--are pawed by swarms of tourists. A phony Gucci bag goes for $16 on the street outside the central Silom department store; the genuine article costs $140 inside.
NEWS
September 14, 1989
Surgeon General C. Everett Koop criticized U.S. tobacco marketing at home and abroad, backing a bill to keep cigarette machines away from minors and declaring America is not respected overseas "because of the manner in which we export disease and death." Koop, in what he said would be his last appearance as surgeon general on Capitol Hill, testified at a House subcommittee hearing called by anti-smoking activists in Congress. During the hearing, Reps. Chester G. Atkins (D-Mass.) and Thomas A.
BUSINESS
May 6, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Silver Bell, its three floors of videotapes making it the largest purveyor of illegally copied movies here, has closed its doors, at least temporarily. "The police came and said to shut down for a week," said a Silver Bell employee, poking his head out from behind a metal grille that carried a small notice in English: "Close." At Villa Supermarket, which caters mainly to affluent expatriates, the video section had disappeared.
BUSINESS
May 6, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Silver Bell, its three floors of videotapes making it the largest purveyor of illegally copied movies here, has closed its doors, at least temporarily. "The police came and said to shut down for a week," said a Silver Bell employee, poking his head out from behind a metal grille that carried a small notice in English: "Close." At Villa Supermarket, which caters mainly to affluent expatriates, the video section had disappeared.
BUSINESS
March 18, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although the drug business is nothing new to Southeast Asia, the region's economic boom has largely overshadowed it. But now Thailand's prominent role as a drug transshipment point could be adversely affecting the country's legitimate exports, according to an Anaheim-based importer. Palle S.
BUSINESS
March 6, 1991 | Leslie Berkman / Times Staff Writer
DDI-Thai Pact: Disease Detection International said that Bangkok RIA Co. Ltd., Thailand's largest reference medical laboratory, has agreed to market the company's rapid diagnostic test kits for pregnancy and infectious diseases. H. Thad Morris, DDI's president and chief executive, said the three-year distribution agreement was signed by Bangkok RIA's President Ninlawan Pichayayothin during her visit last week to DDI's Irvine headquarters.
BUSINESS
July 28, 1990 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Commerce Secretary Robert A. Mosbacher, in a push to expand the market for U.S. exports, is escorting a party of chief executives from seven U.S. corporations to Indonesia and Thailand next week to meet with government officials and business executives there. The visit is part of Mosbacher's 10-day swing through Asia, which includes stops in Hong Kong and Singapore and is his first trip to Southeast Asia since taking over the Department of Commerce last year.
NEWS
September 14, 1989
Surgeon General C. Everett Koop criticized U.S. tobacco marketing at home and abroad, backing a bill to keep cigarette machines away from minors and declaring America is not respected overseas "because of the manner in which we export disease and death." Koop, in what he said would be his last appearance as surgeon general on Capitol Hill, testified at a House subcommittee hearing called by anti-smoking activists in Congress. During the hearing, Reps. Chester G. Atkins (D-Mass.) and Thomas A.
BUSINESS
March 18, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although the drug business is nothing new to Southeast Asia, the region's economic boom has largely overshadowed it. But now Thailand's prominent role as a drug transshipment point could be adversely affecting the country's legitimate exports, according to an Anaheim-based importer. Palle S.
NEWS
July 17, 1991 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States will end its $18-million-a-year wildlife and wildlife products trade with Thailand at the end of this month because the Bangkok government has failed to comply with an international treaty controlling trafficking in endangered species, Interior Secretary Manuel Lujan Jr. said Tuesday. U.S.
BUSINESS
March 14, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS JR., Times Staff Writer
On Bangkok's Silom Road, the city's most fashionable shopping district, pushcart vendors peddle fakes on the sidewalk just a few quick steps from the real stuff in upscale boutiques. Cartier watches, Lee jeans and Lionel Richie tapes--every one a counterfeit--are pawed by swarms of tourists. A phony Gucci bag goes for $16 on the street outside the central Silom department store; the genuine article costs $140 inside.
BUSINESS
May 13, 1987
The Thai government approved a controversial change to curb its lively market in pirated music and videotapes. The change will be debated in Parliament soon. The move is in response to U.S. threats to eliminate Thailand's rights to ship goods into the United States at a low tariff rate. Thailand's Copyright Act of 1978 protects books and works of art but excludes films, music and computer software.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|