Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Trade Third World
IN THE NEWS

United States Trade Third World

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
December 6, 1990 | KAREN TUMULTY and JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The world's poor countries, which were drawn into international trade talks four years ago by promises that they would gain new export markets, are complaining now that the talks have degenerated in their final scheduled week into a U.S.-European food fight. "We have been shut out completely," Mokammel Hague, the Bangladeshi commerce secretary, said Wednesday. "We are feeling like schoolchildren waiting for the results to come out of the headmaster's room." The "headmaster's room" is where U.S.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
May 12, 2000 | Associated Press
The Senate approved legislation to give sub-Saharan Africa, Central America and the nations of the Caribbean a better chance to share in the world's economic prosperity through trade. The 77-19 vote sends the Africa Growth and Opportunity Act to President Clinton, who said he looked forward to signing a bill that "reaffirms America's commitment to open trade and strengthens the partnership between the United States and our friends in Africa and the Caribbean Basin."
Advertisement
BUSINESS
August 1, 1991 | From Associated Press
Trade negotiators here agreed Wednesday to extend existing international trade restrictions on textiles and clothing until the end of 1992, despite demands by Third World exporters for lower import barriers. The General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade textiles committee said the Multifiber Arrangement is being extended in the expectation that new rules being negotiated as part of the Uruguay Round of world trade talks will come into force in 1993.
NEWS
September 9, 1997 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not long ago, the only way most poor countries could stay afloat was to beg for ever-larger amounts of foreign aid. Western governments poured billions into costly development projects. Private industry and capital were almost nowhere to be seen. No more. Richer countries, feeling strapped for cash themselves, have cut back their foreign aid. At the same time, however, many of the impoverished nations have abandoned socialism and embraced capitalism.
BUSINESS
September 15, 1988 | ART PINE, Times Staff Writer
The Reagan Administration, intensifying its efforts to pressure developing countries into adopting more free market economic policies, said Wednesday that it will push to end a 1955 trade exemption that gives Third World countries special permission to bar imports. In a speech cleared by top policy-makers, acting Treasury Secretary M.
NEWS
September 9, 1997 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not long ago, the only way most poor countries could stay afloat was to beg for ever-larger amounts of foreign aid. Western governments poured billions into costly development projects. Private industry and capital were almost nowhere to be seen. No more. Richer countries, feeling strapped for cash themselves, have cut back their foreign aid. At the same time, however, many of the impoverished nations have abandoned socialism and embraced capitalism.
BUSINESS
May 12, 2000 | Associated Press
The Senate approved legislation to give sub-Saharan Africa, Central America and the nations of the Caribbean a better chance to share in the world's economic prosperity through trade. The 77-19 vote sends the Africa Growth and Opportunity Act to President Clinton, who said he looked forward to signing a bill that "reaffirms America's commitment to open trade and strengthens the partnership between the United States and our friends in Africa and the Caribbean Basin."
NEWS
June 5, 1990 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Across East Asia and through much of the developing world, a battle is raging that some are calling a new Opium War. Britain's victory in that 19th-Century conflict enabled its traders to continue exchanging Indian opium for Chinese tea and silk, making huge profits while devastating China. Today's fight is over tobacco. Western firms, faced with declining demand at home, are seeking to expand overseas.
NEWS
January 31, 1989 | MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writer
American investigators, in a crackdown on U.S. exporters who supply chemical weapons components to Third World countries, on Monday charged a New Jersey man and a Dutch businessman with seven criminal counts each for allegedly selling thiodiglycol, a major ingredient of mustard gas, to Iran and Iraq. U.S. Atty. Breckinridge L. Willcox also announced that Alcolac International Inc., a Baltimore manufacturer of the chemical, will plead guilty to violating a U.S.
BUSINESS
August 9, 1989 | From Reuters
The United States will open an investigation of worker rights and expropriation policies in eight developing countries, the U.S. Trade Representative's Office said Tuesday. If violations of American trade policies are found, the nations could lose their low-tariff benefits for exports to the United States under the Generalized System of Preferences program.
BUSINESS
August 1, 1991 | From Associated Press
Trade negotiators here agreed Wednesday to extend existing international trade restrictions on textiles and clothing until the end of 1992, despite demands by Third World exporters for lower import barriers. The General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade textiles committee said the Multifiber Arrangement is being extended in the expectation that new rules being negotiated as part of the Uruguay Round of world trade talks will come into force in 1993.
BUSINESS
December 6, 1990 | KAREN TUMULTY and JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The world's poor countries, which were drawn into international trade talks four years ago by promises that they would gain new export markets, are complaining now that the talks have degenerated in their final scheduled week into a U.S.-European food fight. "We have been shut out completely," Mokammel Hague, the Bangladeshi commerce secretary, said Wednesday. "We are feeling like schoolchildren waiting for the results to come out of the headmaster's room." The "headmaster's room" is where U.S.
NEWS
June 5, 1990 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Across East Asia and through much of the developing world, a battle is raging that some are calling a new Opium War. Britain's victory in that 19th-Century conflict enabled its traders to continue exchanging Indian opium for Chinese tea and silk, making huge profits while devastating China. Today's fight is over tobacco. Western firms, faced with declining demand at home, are seeking to expand overseas.
BUSINESS
August 9, 1989 | From Reuters
The United States will open an investigation of worker rights and expropriation policies in eight developing countries, the U.S. Trade Representative's Office said Tuesday. If violations of American trade policies are found, the nations could lose their low-tariff benefits for exports to the United States under the Generalized System of Preferences program.
NEWS
March 11, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writer
President Bush, seeking to impose controls on dumping of hazardous wastes to the Third World, announced Friday that he will propose legislation to outlaw such exports unless the country guarantees that it will handle the material in an environmentally safe manner. The move is an attempt to forestall the possibility that U.S. firms might turn to less developed countries as waste-disposal sites in an effort to dodge domestic regulations that have become increasingly stringent.
NEWS
January 31, 1989 | MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writer
American investigators, in a crackdown on U.S. exporters who supply chemical weapons components to Third World countries, on Monday charged a New Jersey man and a Dutch businessman with seven criminal counts each for allegedly selling thiodiglycol, a major ingredient of mustard gas, to Iran and Iraq. U.S. Atty. Breckinridge L. Willcox also announced that Alcolac International Inc., a Baltimore manufacturer of the chemical, will plead guilty to violating a U.S.
BUSINESS
May 25, 1988 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
Detroit! Detroit! What a wonderful town. The yen is up, and the dollar is down. It is a jingle that should have everybody driving in an Oldsmobile--or at least a Plymouth--by now, right? Well, the Motor City isn't singing such an upbeat tune these days. With the Japanese still coming at them--along with the Koreans, Brazilians and Mexicans--Detroit might well be singing the blues instead.
NEWS
March 11, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writer
President Bush, seeking to impose controls on dumping of hazardous wastes to the Third World, announced Friday that he will propose legislation to outlaw such exports unless the country guarantees that it will handle the material in an environmentally safe manner. The move is an attempt to forestall the possibility that U.S. firms might turn to less developed countries as waste-disposal sites in an effort to dodge domestic regulations that have become increasingly stringent.
BUSINESS
September 15, 1988 | ART PINE, Times Staff Writer
The Reagan Administration, intensifying its efforts to pressure developing countries into adopting more free market economic policies, said Wednesday that it will push to end a 1955 trade exemption that gives Third World countries special permission to bar imports. In a speech cleared by top policy-makers, acting Treasury Secretary M.
BUSINESS
May 25, 1988 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
Detroit! Detroit! What a wonderful town. The yen is up, and the dollar is down. It is a jingle that should have everybody driving in an Oldsmobile--or at least a Plymouth--by now, right? Well, the Motor City isn't singing such an upbeat tune these days. With the Japanese still coming at them--along with the Koreans, Brazilians and Mexicans--Detroit might well be singing the blues instead.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|