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NEWS
December 2, 1989
Following are some of the issues likely to be discussed by President Bush and Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev when they meet on warships in Marsaxlokk Bay: EASTERN EUROPE: The political upheaval in the Soviet-led East Bloc as Poland, Hungary, East Germany and Czechoslovakia move to lift the "Iron Curtain" and introduce democratic reforms.
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BUSINESS
December 3, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Soviets Buying $1.25 Billion in Farm Goods: Their shopping list includes U.S. wheat, livestock feeds, hops, almonds and vegetable oil, the Agriculture Department said. Meat products were missing from the list, despite pressure from lawmakers and livestock producers for the Soviets to include more "value-added" items. The Soviets are purchasing the goods with credit guarantees.
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NEWS
April 10, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Swapping soft-drink concentrate for vodka and merchant ships, Pepsico Inc. on Monday signed a $3-billion barter trade pact with the Soviets that it called the biggest, longest-running agreement ever concluded by the Kremlin with a U.S. firm. "President Bush and President Gorbachev should during their meetings have Pepsi and Stolichnaya on the table to remind them what good agreements are," said Pepsico Executive Committee Chairman Donald M. Kendall, whose experience in U.S.
NEWS
November 26, 1991 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate, breaking a political impasse, overwhelmingly authorized President Bush on Monday to use up to $700 million from the U.S. defense budget to help reduce the Soviet nuclear arsenal and to send humanitarian aid to starving Soviet republics this winter. In the first of two startling reversals, senators voted 86 to 8 on legislation to allow Bush to divert up to $500 million from the U.S. defense budget to help the Soviets dismantle the bulk of their tactical nuclear weapons.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1989
A Superior Court judge in Santa Ana has thrown out a legal-malpractice lawsuit brought by a Corona man who blamed his attorney for his 1980 conviction on charges of illegally exporting optical equipment to the Soviet Union. Judge William F. Rylaarsdam last week dismissed the $10-million claim by Walter J. Spawr, citing a five-year statute of limitations on the prosecution of civil litigation, attorneys in the case said. Spawr, 48, alleged in a 1984 lawsuit that attorney William A.
NEWS
June 10, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prodded into action by an insistent Mikhail S. Gorbachev, the Bush Administration has accepted the idea that the West must help the Soviet Union reform its collapsing economy but is campaigning to ensure that no Western country offers significant financial aid to Moscow without demanding tough conditions in return, senior officials say.
BUSINESS
August 30, 1990 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A small Yorba Linda company is forming a joint venture in the Soviet Union to assemble medical equipment to diagnose respiratory problems caused by environmental pollution and smoking. The deal, subject to Moscow's final approval, would have an interesting twist in this era of warming East-West relations: The Soviets plan to generate cash to buy parts for the assembly operation by selling scrap metal from dismantled Soviet tanks. George D.
NEWS
June 8, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States and its major allies agreed Thursday on a sweeping overhaul of Western restrictions on high-technology exports to nations of the former Soviet Bloc, easing the way for the sale of billions of dollars of equipment to help modernize Eastern Europe.
NEWS
June 2, 1990 | From a Times Staff Writer
Excerpts of an exchange between Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and U.S. congressional leaders at the Soviet Embassy: On Trade GORBACHEV: The American press is saying, "Gorbachev, compared to any other Soviet leader, has come to Washington very weak and he will not get anything."
BUSINESS
October 1, 1991 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
SPI Pharmaceuticals Inc., a small Costa Mesa drug company, said Monday that its Yugoslavian joint-venture company has received a $22-million order for pharmaceutical products from a Soviet trading company. This is the largest order for Belgrade-based ICN Galenika since Costa Mesa-based SPI acquired 75% of Yugoslavia's largest drug company, Galenika Pharmaceuticals, for $50 million in May. ICN Pharmaceuticals, also of Costa Mesa, owns 80% of SPI.
NEWS
September 12, 1991 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush announced Wednesday that he will "move quickly" to establish normal economic relations with the newly independent Baltic states by offering them most-favored-nation trading status with the United States.
BUSINESS
September 9, 1991 | Cristina Lee, Times staff writer
The Soviet Union never looked more attractive nor uncertain to foreign investors than today. The disintegrating central government has left some companies without a Soviet partner. Ventures under negotiation are frozen while new laws are being considered and created. Richard L. Schwartz, manager of Pannell Kerr Forster's management advisory services in Irvine, negotiates and structures deals for U.S. companies in the Soviet Union.
NEWS
September 4, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration pledged Tuesday to help the newly recognized Baltic republics cope with some of the problems that will accompany their independence, but officials warned that large-scale U.S. economic aid is unlikely. "We'll want to be able to work out what's the most appropriate way of working directly with the Baltic states to support their independence and support them along the path that they have chosen," said State Department spokesman Richard Boucher.
BUSINESS
September 3, 1991 | PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Lees arrived in Moscow a few weeks ago to do a little business and found himself in the middle of a coup. Lees is president of Pacific InterTrade Corp., a Westlake Village company that helps American concerns set up complex trading deals in foreign countries. He traveled to the Soviet Union to arrange the export to a factory in Lithuania of U.S.-made equipment used in fabricating television picture tubes. But on Aug.
BUSINESS
August 21, 1991 | THUAN LE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviets speaking Tuesday at a business conference in Fullerton sought to assure Americans that it is still safe to start business ventures in the Soviet Union despite the sudden political upheaval. "Foreign trade relations will be kept . . . so you should have no doubt about that," Kamil Bekyashev, a Soviet adviser on international business law, told 25 Orange County business people who came to the Fullerton Marriott Hotel to hear about doing business in the Soviet Union.
NEWS
June 2, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S.-Soviet trade agreement signed Friday by President Bush and Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev represents a symbolic turning point between the two countries, but it is unlikely to help the shattered Soviet economy anytime soon. Although Gorbachev will not leave Washington with a formal promise that Moscow will receive "most-favored-nation" trade preferences, the treaty is a prerequisite for the preferred status and for normalizing U.S.
NEWS
June 2, 1990 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush gave Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev a valuable political gift Friday by signing a U.S.-Soviet trade agreement, something the Kremlin leader desperately wanted to take home to Moscow from this week's summit meeting. In return, U.S. and Soviet officials indicated, the Soviet leader told Bush that he is confident he can get peaceful negotiations started with the rebellious Baltic republic of Lithuania within the next few weeks--meeting a major U.S.
BUSINESS
August 21, 1991 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The global economy, just beginning to recover from a wrenching slump in the United States and other key industrial nations, has shuddered once more in response to the political and economic reverberations of the coup in the Soviet Union. The dramatic events in Moscow have roiled the world's financial markets and threaten to inject new uncertainties into world trade as well.
NEWS
August 20, 1991 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stunned by the ouster of Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, members of Congress said Monday that they are likely to resist any efforts by President Bush to win their approval of U.S-Soviet trade and arms reduction agreements. Some members of Congress also suggested that the coup could cause them to reconsider Bush's requests for cuts in defense spending.
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