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United States Trade West Germany

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NEWS
June 6, 1987 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and JACK NELSON, Times Staff Writers
President Reagan, who less than two years ago signed the most expensive farm aid bill in history, called Friday for the elimination of agricultural subsidies worldwide by the year 2000 as a way of promoting better world economic health.
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NEWS
July 10, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with the threat of divisive conflicts, President Bush and West German Chancellor Helmut Kohl forged a series of tentative compromises Monday on the major issues facing the economic summit: aid to the Soviet Union, global warming and trade.
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BUSINESS
February 5, 1988 | ART PINE and TOM REDBURN, Times Staff Writers
The Reagan Administration will not ask West Germany to reduce its interest rates to help keep the dollar stable in the face of declining interest rates in the United States, a senior Administration official said Thursday. The Administration had hinted a few days ago that it might consider such a move but apparently has abandoned the idea following a meeting Wednesday between Treasury Secretary James A. Baker III and West German Finance Minister Gerhard Stoltenberg.
BUSINESS
October 28, 1987 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
West German President Richard von Weizsaecker declared here Tuesday that if the United States reduces its budget deficit, European nations should expand their economies. The Federal Republic president was suggesting a means to contain the current worldwide financial crisis, and while his is a largely ceremonial post, he is listened to carefully by policy-makers in Bonn.
NEWS
April 28, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Disclosing yet another major weapons-export sting, the Customs Service said Friday it had thwarted a plot to smuggle out of the United States a sophisticated air defense system being sought by Libya, Iran and the Soviet Union. Federal authorities in Baltimore said an undercover sting had led to arrests of two munitions dealers in the case, including a West German national with connections to the Middle East and Eastern Europe.
BUSINESS
January 23, 1990 | GREGORY CROUCH
Trimedyne said Monday it has agreed to distribute at least $20-million worth of lasers and catheters made by a West Germany company. Under the agreement with Technolas Laser Technik of Munich, the Tustin-based medical technology firm will sell Technolas' equipment under the Trimedyne trade name in the United States and in countries outside Western Europe. Technolas manufactures lasers and catheters used to vaporize fatty deposits in clogged heart arteries.
BUSINESS
October 21, 1989 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lexus, Toyota's new luxury car line just introduced in September, already has the Germans on the run. In its first full month on the market, Lexus stunned its West German competitors by actually outselling BMW in the United States. Toyota officials said 35% of their first buyers have traded in European luxury cars, mainly BMW and Mercedes-Benz models.
NEWS
September 30, 1987
The Pentagon, making public a long-simmering internal dispute, accused the Commerce Department of an "egregious lapse of responsibility" that had allowed high-tech American computers to be sold to Soviet-controlled corporations.
NEWS
October 6, 1989 | RUDY ABRAMSON, Times Staff Writer
The Energy Department has quietly sold West Germany $20-million worth of highly radioactive cesium and strontium and is seeking to clear the way for its shipment from Hanford, Wash., to the Pacific Coast, then through the Panama Canal and across the Atlantic. It would be the first large-scale export of high-level nuclear waste material, and officials of the environmental activist organization Greenpeace said Thursday that they would attempt to block the shipments.
BUSINESS
September 25, 1989 | ART PINE, Times Staff Writer
The United States warned Sunday that it cannot reduce its outsized trade imbalances on its own, and called on West Germany and Japan to step up their efforts to trim their trade surpluses, which are the mirror image of America's trade deficit. In a speech before the policy-setting Interim Committee of the International Monetary Fund, U.S. Treasury Secretary Nicholas F. Brady reiterated American calls for the two trading partners to spur more demand at home and open up their economies to more U.
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