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United States Trade Western Europe

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NEWS
March 4, 1999 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An improbable U.S.-European scuffle over the banana business escalated toward a trade war Wednesday as the Clinton administration moved a major step closer to punitive 100% tariffs on an array of European imports from cashmere sweaters to prosciutto. In an action that drew angry protests by European officials, the U.S. ordered importers of selected European goods in this country to immediately begin posting bonds to cover burdensome new tariffs that could be imposed as early as mid-March.
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NEWS
March 4, 1999 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An improbable U.S.-European scuffle over the banana business escalated toward a trade war Wednesday as the Clinton administration moved a major step closer to punitive 100% tariffs on an array of European imports from cashmere sweaters to prosciutto. In an action that drew angry protests by European officials, the U.S. ordered importers of selected European goods in this country to immediately begin posting bonds to cover burdensome new tariffs that could be imposed as early as mid-March.
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BUSINESS
March 26, 1990 | Cristina Lee, Times staff writer
A decade ago, the thought of 12 European states operating as a single economic bloc was nearly inconceivable. Skeptics were quick to say that the differences among the members of the European Economic Community were far too complex to iron out. But it is happening. Come 1992, the EEC, with 325 million people, will become the largest single marketplace in the world.
NEWS
February 4, 1999 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Crisis in Asia. Chaos in Russia. Turmoil in Brazil. Had enough? Well, here's one more migraine headache for the world economy: bananas. The United States and Western Europe are tangled up in a smoldering feud over a fruit they barely grow, that provides them with next-to-no jobs, that matters to only a few companies in each region and that nobody even pretends has a lot of strategic importance. Indeed, a 1995 mudslide in Ventura County led to the demise of one of the U.S.
NEWS
February 4, 1999 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Crisis in Asia. Chaos in Russia. Turmoil in Brazil. Had enough? Well, here's one more migraine headache for the world economy: bananas. The United States and Western Europe are tangled up in a smoldering feud over a fruit they barely grow, that provides them with next-to-no jobs, that matters to only a few companies in each region and that nobody even pretends has a lot of strategic importance. Indeed, a 1995 mudslide in Ventura County led to the demise of one of the U.S.
BUSINESS
March 26, 1990 | Cristina Lee, Times staff writer
A decade ago, the thought of 12 European states operating as a single economic bloc was nearly inconceivable. Skeptics were quick to say that the differences among the members of the European Economic Community were far too complex to iron out. But it is happening. Come 1992, the EEC, with 325 million people, will become the largest single marketplace in the world.
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