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United States Trade Yugoslavia

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BUSINESS
April 21, 1999
Texaco Inc. will halt shipments of gasoline to Yugoslavia after saying that it made such a shipment on April 10, nearly three weeks after NATO's air war against the Balkan state began. A company spokesman said Texaco had received assurances that the gasoline, refined in Britain, would be used only within the Belgrade-controlled Republic of Montenegro, which has said it is neutral in the current conflict.
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NEWS
January 20, 2001 | From Associated Press
President Clinton, responding to positive developments in Yugoslavia, notified congressional leaders Friday that he was lifting trade and financial sanctions against the Balkan nation. The easing of sanctions does not apply to former President Slobodan Milosevic, his family, his cronies or indicted war crimes suspects. All told, 81 people will remain under sanctions restrictions.
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BUSINESS
February 15, 1990 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
SPI Pharmaceuticals said Wednesday it has tentatively agreed to merge with Yugoslavia's second-largest drug manufacturer in what it said would be the first merger of its kind between U.S. and Eastern European drug companies. The Costa Mesa-based pharmaceutical company said it had signed a letter of intent to merge with Galenika, a Belgrade-based firm with 5,800 employees and annual sales of about $150 million.
BUSINESS
April 21, 1999
Texaco Inc. will halt shipments of gasoline to Yugoslavia after saying that it made such a shipment on April 10, nearly three weeks after NATO's air war against the Balkan state began. A company spokesman said Texaco had received assurances that the gasoline, refined in Britain, would be used only within the Belgrade-controlled Republic of Montenegro, which has said it is neutral in the current conflict.
BUSINESS
February 27, 1990 | PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First came the Yugo, the pint-size car built in Yugoslavia that has been called "the worst car in America." Now get ready for a bus from Yugoslavia. A Van Nuys company, Transportation Alternatives, has entered a joint venture to distribute Yugoslav-built school buses in the United States. The joint venture, called TAM/USA, is a partnership between the transportation design firm, and Tovarna Avtomobilov, which says it is Yugoslavia's largest manufacturer of buses, trucks and engines.
BUSINESS
May 1, 1991 | BOB SCHWARTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
SPI Pharmaceuticals Inc.'s foray into Eastern Europe begins today as it takes control of Yugoslavia's leading drug manufacturer, Galenika Pharmaceuticals Inc. The new subsidiary, called ICN Galenika, is a joint venture with SPI owning 75% and Galenika, a state-owned company with a smattering of other small industrial ventures, retaining a 25% interest. Three of the company's four directors will come from SPI, while Dr.
BUSINESS
June 8, 1988 | From Reuters
The United States on Tuesday threw solid support behind the economic recovery and reform program of nonaligned communist Yugoslavia, which is struggling with a serious economic crisis. Deputy Secretary of State John Whitehead, during a Belgrade visit, described the new Yugoslav policies aimed at creating a market-based economy as a dramatic moment in Yugoslav history.
NEWS
December 7, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Though the European Community recently scaled back its punitive measures, the Bush Administration imposed new economic sanctions against Yugoslavia on Friday in response to continued violations of a U.N.-mediated cease-fire in the Balkan country's bloody civil war. State Department spokeswoman Margaret Tutwiler accused Serbia and the Serb-dominated Yugoslav army of "reprehensible" attacks against civilian targets in Croatia.
NEWS
January 20, 2001 | From Associated Press
President Clinton, responding to positive developments in Yugoslavia, notified congressional leaders Friday that he was lifting trade and financial sanctions against the Balkan nation. The easing of sanctions does not apply to former President Slobodan Milosevic, his family, his cronies or indicted war crimes suspects. All told, 81 people will remain under sanctions restrictions.
NEWS
December 7, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Though the European Community recently scaled back its punitive measures, the Bush Administration imposed new economic sanctions against Yugoslavia on Friday in response to continued violations of a U.N.-mediated cease-fire in the Balkan country's bloody civil war. State Department spokeswoman Margaret Tutwiler accused Serbia and the Serb-dominated Yugoslav army of "reprehensible" attacks against civilian targets in Croatia.
BUSINESS
May 1, 1991 | BOB SCHWARTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
SPI Pharmaceuticals Inc.'s foray into Eastern Europe begins today as it takes control of Yugoslavia's leading drug manufacturer, Galenika Pharmaceuticals Inc. The new subsidiary, called ICN Galenika, is a joint venture with SPI owning 75% and Galenika, a state-owned company with a smattering of other small industrial ventures, retaining a 25% interest. Three of the company's four directors will come from SPI, while Dr.
BUSINESS
February 27, 1990 | PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First came the Yugo, the pint-size car built in Yugoslavia that has been called "the worst car in America." Now get ready for a bus from Yugoslavia. A Van Nuys company, Transportation Alternatives, has entered a joint venture to distribute Yugoslav-built school buses in the United States. The joint venture, called TAM/USA, is a partnership between the transportation design firm, and Tovarna Avtomobilov, which says it is Yugoslavia's largest manufacturer of buses, trucks and engines.
BUSINESS
February 15, 1990 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
SPI Pharmaceuticals said Wednesday it has tentatively agreed to merge with Yugoslavia's second-largest drug manufacturer in what it said would be the first merger of its kind between U.S. and Eastern European drug companies. The Costa Mesa-based pharmaceutical company said it had signed a letter of intent to merge with Galenika, a Belgrade-based firm with 5,800 employees and annual sales of about $150 million.
BUSINESS
June 8, 1988 | From Reuters
The United States on Tuesday threw solid support behind the economic recovery and reform program of nonaligned communist Yugoslavia, which is struggling with a serious economic crisis. Deputy Secretary of State John Whitehead, during a Belgrade visit, described the new Yugoslav policies aimed at creating a market-based economy as a dramatic moment in Yugoslav history.
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