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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1990 | RONALD L. SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An investigation into last year's record cocaine seizure at a Sylmar warehouse shows that Colombian drug cartels have shipped vast quantities of cocaine along America's interstate highway system despite law enforcement efforts to choke it off, according to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration.
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NEWS
October 3, 2001 | MARISA SCHULTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A transportation official told dismayed lawmakers Tuesday that although security has been tightened on the nation's rail lines and at ports, he could not provide specific details that some senators requested. James Underwood, director of the Transportation Department's Office of Intelligence and Security, said that requiring baggage checks is under consideration, but he could not offer a possible timeline for when a decision will be made.
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BUSINESS
August 23, 1988 | Associated Press
After 2 1/2 years of negotiations, the governments of Australia and the United States have agreed to expand airline service between the two countries. An agreement signed during the weekend allows U.S. airlines to fly to Brisbane, Cairns and one other Australian city to be chosen by the United States, and then fly on to eight other Australian destinations. The two U.S. carriers serving Australia, Continental Airlines and United Airlines, currently can fly to four Australian cities.
NEWS
October 3, 2001 | RICHARD A. SERRANO and RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A key component of a Bush administration initiative to make air travel safer will address the largely untested security status of hundreds of thousands of employees at the nation's airports and airline companies.
NEWS
July 13, 1990 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Light rail systems, like the Blue Line that will begin to run between Los Angeles and Long Beach this weekend, are attractive and fun to ride, but they tend to be expensive money-losers that do little to solve urban transportation problems. That is the widely held view of academic experts who have studied the new light rail lines that have been built in various American cities in recent years. A recent U.S. Department of Transportation study of new light rail projects in Buffalo, N.Y.
MAGAZINE
May 14, 1995 | Karl Zimmermann, Karl Zimmermann is the author of "CZ: The Story of the California Zephyr" (Quadrant Press).
Train-riding is my personal nirvana, a transport of delight. Aboard, I always have a book with me; it's generally open on my lap, but my mind is often elsewhere--or nowhere--in an abstracted musing encouraged by the muted but insistent rumble of wheel on rail, the faint, plaintive cry of the diesel far ahead, the joggle and jounce of the train.
BUSINESS
January 24, 1991 | ROBERT W. STEWART and DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Seeking to help the ailing U.S. airline industry find new sources of funds, the Bush Administration reversed itself Wednesday and said it will begin permitting foreign investors to acquire up to 49% of domestic air carriers. The decision allows KLM Royal Dutch Airlines to continue its $400-million investment in NWA Inc., the Eagan, Minn.-based parent of Northwest Airlines.
NEWS
June 27, 1992 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's railroads began rumbling back into service again Friday after Congress and President Bush acted overnight to end the two-day-old rail shutdown. Most rail operations were expected to return to normal by this afternoon. A spokesman for the Assn. of American Railroads said crews were clearing away a "backlog" of several thousand idled freight cars. Most passenger service was being restored Friday as well. One factor slowing the return to full service was a U.S.
NEWS
March 4, 1990 | DAVID FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A striking Greyhound bus driver, picketing outside the company's terminal in Redding, was crushed to death Saturday morning when an Oregon-bound bus driven by a replacement driver pinned him against a concrete wall, authorities said. Several union members said they tried unsuccessfully to stop the bus after it hit the man. The replacement driver motored out of the city before stopping and flagging down a passing police officer. He was returned to Redding for questioning but not arrested.
NEWS
January 2, 1990 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With classic American entrepreneurial spirit, some daring businessmen are trying to turn a longstanding problem into a gold mine--or, more precisely, to convert vexing traffic jams into money-making toll roads. Private concerns are organizing across the nation to do what only governments have traditionally done: build roads. And what's more, they think they can make it pay. "Traffic congestion problems are a business opportunity for us," said Ralph Stanley, chief executive of Toll Road Corp.
BUSINESS
September 29, 2001 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's airlines this week began receiving desperately needed cash from the U.S. bailout. Now, they're ready to tap the other part of the aid: federal loan guarantees. But there are no guarantees that will be enough to keep all the airlines flying. In effect, Uncle Sam could well determine which U.S. carriers survive over the long term and which don't, according to investment bankers, lawmakers and industry analysts.
BUSINESS
July 11, 2001 | From Reuters
The Bush administration said late Tuesday that it wants to immediately begin a government review that could lead to increased auto fuel efficiency standards, which have not been changed in 26 years. Transportation Secretary Norman Y. Mineta, in a letter to congressional leaders, asked lawmakers to permit his agency to begin a rule-making process that would research Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards.
NEWS
June 14, 2001 | From Reuters
The Federal Aviation Administration defended its 10-year, $11.5-billion air traffic modernization plan in Congress Wednesday as skeptical lawmakers reminded the agency about past failures of big-picture projects. "In 20 years I've seen a lot of plans," Rep. James L. Oberstar, a Minnesota Democrat, told senior agency officials at a House Transportation aviation subcommittee hearing. "I don't want to see another one gathering dust." Subcommittee chairman John L.
NEWS
March 14, 2001 | RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Transportation Secretary Norman Y. Mineta said Tuesday that he supports charging airlines steep congestion fees for landing at busy airports during peak travel hours to ease delays. The controversial proposal--backed by some airport managers and economists and opposed by airlines--would force the carriers to spread out their schedules.
BUSINESS
November 30, 2000 | Reuters
Amtrak said it will begin rewarding frequent travelers with free train tickets, flights, hotel stays and other gifts as the U.S. rail service pushes to boost ridership before a 2003 deadline to wean itself from government subsidies. Train travelers will earn points for every trip under Guest Rewards, launched in tandem with the beginning of ticket sales for its high-speed Acela Express train, which begins service Dec. 11.
NEWS
December 19, 1999 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Only one American Airlines flight originating in the continental United States will be aloft as the nation greets the year 2000. The rest of the continental flights of the world's second-largest carrier have been canceled, and that one might have been canceled too, if not for one particular passenger.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1991 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a decade of slashed budgets, proposals to increase federal transportation spending--and to spend that money in "revolutionary" ways--are good news for Los Angeles, mass transit planners said at the annual meeting of the American Public Transit Assn.
NEWS
December 31, 1995 | From Associated Press
President Clinton signed legislation Saturday shutting down the Interstate Commerce Commission, an independent federal agency created more than a century ago to ride herd on railroad "robber barons." The ICC was the government's oldest regulatory agency. Its elimination is a rare example of a government agency closing its doors. It will go out of business permanently on New Year's Day.
BUSINESS
October 21, 1999 | Tom Petruno
Don't try telling anyone who owns a transportation stock that we're still in a bull market. Despite a sharp rebound Wednesday for the Dow Jones industrials, the Dow transportation stock index slid 51.77 points, or 1.8%, to 2,808.44--its lowest since last October. For investors who believe in the "Dow Theory," the continuing plunge in the transports index is a bad sign. The theory holds that a bull market is in trouble if the Dow transports are moving counter to the Dow industrials.
BUSINESS
April 1, 1999 | LIZ PULLIAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A revised IRS deduction for business mileage takes effect today, ironically going down just as fuel prices have been going up nationwide--especially in California. The new IRS rate is 31 cents a mile, down from 32.5 cents per mile. Most taxpayers who use their cars for business and many employers that reimburse employees for mileage use the IRS mileage rate, although it is also possible to deduct actual operating costs.
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