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NEWS
May 27, 1998 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Two highway safety provisions that were essential to a compromise worked out by House and Senate negotiators were inadvertently dropped from the final version of a $217-billion highway and mass transit bill passed by Congress last week. The measures would penalize states that refuse to crack down on repeat drunk-driving offenders or drivers caught with open containers of alcoholic beverages in their vehicles.
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NEWS
May 27, 1998 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Two highway safety provisions that were essential to a compromise worked out by House and Senate negotiators were inadvertently dropped from the final version of a $217-billion highway and mass transit bill passed by Congress last week. The measures would penalize states that refuse to crack down on repeat drunk-driving offenders or drivers caught with open containers of alcoholic beverages in their vehicles.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1996
Social Security worker Elisa Trujillo became an unwitting poster child for federal transportation investments Friday as she pulled her 30-year-old Schwinn Varsity into the Long Beach bike station, the 5,000th commuter to do so since the center's opening in March.
NEWS
May 2, 1998 | From Associated Press
Congress, wrangling over a multibillion-dollar law governing federal highway spending, let the existing roadway law expire Friday. The Clinton administration warns of dire consequences: delay of highway projects and curtailment of safety inspection programs. But lawmakers disagree. "There will be no dropping of the shovels," said Nicholas Graham, spokesman for Senate Environment and Public Works Committee Chairman John H. Chafee (R-R.I.).
NEWS
July 26, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The House, on a 361-61 vote, passed a $38-billion transportation spending bill that boosts funding for highways and air traffic control while reducing money for trains and mass transit. The bill was sent to the Senate. Final approval came after the House rejected a move to end collective bargaining requirements for local transit systems. Democrats successfully challenged a provision in the bill that they said would have stripped workers of the right to bargain for wages and protection.
NEWS
May 2, 1998 | From Associated Press
Congress, wrangling over a multibillion-dollar law governing federal highway spending, let the existing roadway law expire Friday. The Clinton administration warns of dire consequences: delay of highway projects and curtailment of safety inspection programs. But lawmakers disagree. "There will be no dropping of the shovels," said Nicholas Graham, spokesman for Senate Environment and Public Works Committee Chairman John H. Chafee (R-R.I.).
NEWS
March 6, 1998 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Senate leaders agreed Thursday to boost federal funding of mass transit programs by an additional $5 billion over six years to help cities buy new buses and finance construction projects such as Los Angeles' Metro Rail. The extra transit funds were negotiated behind closed doors as the full Senate continued to debate a $173-billion, six-year highway spending bill. The measure could pass the Senate as early as next week, with House action expected to follow shortly.
NEWS
March 6, 1998 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Senate leaders agreed Thursday to boost federal funding of mass transit programs by an additional $5 billion over six years to help cities buy new buses and finance construction projects such as Los Angeles' Metro Rail. The extra transit funds were negotiated behind closed doors as the full Senate continued to debate a $173-billion, six-year highway spending bill. The measure could pass the Senate as early as next week, with House action expected to follow shortly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1996
Social Security worker Elisa Trujillo became an unwitting poster child for federal transportation investments Friday as she pulled her 30-year-old Schwinn Varsity into the Long Beach bike station, the 5,000th commuter to do so since the center's opening in March.
NEWS
July 26, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The House, on a 361-61 vote, passed a $38-billion transportation spending bill that boosts funding for highways and air traffic control while reducing money for trains and mass transit. The bill was sent to the Senate. Final approval came after the House rejected a move to end collective bargaining requirements for local transit systems. Democrats successfully challenged a provision in the bill that they said would have stripped workers of the right to bargain for wages and protection.
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