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March 4, 1998 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A key Senate committee loosened its belt Tuesday by voting to inflate the pot of money spent on the nation's roads and bridges over the next six years in a deal that could mean more federal funds for car-dependent California. The agreement would add $26 billion to the massive public works bill that lays out spending for the nation's transportation needs over the next six years, giving every state more money to spend on its roads.
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NEWS
March 4, 1998 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A key Senate committee loosened its belt Tuesday by voting to inflate the pot of money spent on the nation's roads and bridges over the next six years in a deal that could mean more federal funds for car-dependent California. The agreement would add $26 billion to the massive public works bill that lays out spending for the nation's transportation needs over the next six years, giving every state more money to spend on its roads.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1992 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A key House committee voted Wednesday to allocate $110 million for construction of the Los Angeles Metro Rail system next year--considerably less than the subway's proponents had sought but more than enough to keep the project on track.
NEWS
March 13, 1997 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unveiling his $175-billion plan for funding the nation's highways over the next six years, President Clinton proposed Wednesday that states be permitted to charge tolls on interstate highways and to use the revenue to improve their transportation systems. "States need a lot of resources--state, federal, and other--to keep up with the aging of their transportation systems," Deputy Transportation Secretary Mortimer Downey said. "This could be one more way to raise those dollars."
NEWS
October 21, 1992 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Buoyed by the growing emergence of the country's infrastructure as a presidential campaign issue, a group of transportation officials Monday challenged the candidates to move swiftly in launching an aggressive mass transit program. Members of the American Public Transit Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1992 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stray language in a law setting federal transportation policy has slashed by half the federal construction funding for the Metro Red Line and 15 other mass-transit projects across the country, but congressional leaders are scrambling to remedy the problem with a new law. The conflict has its greatest potential effect on Los Angeles, which could lose $65 million for the Hollywood leg of the Red Line subway, on which construction is about to start.
NEWS
March 13, 1997 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unveiling his $175-billion plan for funding the nation's highways over the next six years, President Clinton proposed Wednesday that states be permitted to charge tolls on interstate highways and to use the revenue to improve their transportation systems. "States need a lot of resources--state, federal, and other--to keep up with the aging of their transportation systems," Deputy Transportation Secretary Mortimer Downey said. "This could be one more way to raise those dollars."
NEWS
October 21, 1992 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Buoyed by the growing emergence of the country's infrastructure as a presidential campaign issue, a group of transportation officials Monday challenged the candidates to move swiftly in launching an aggressive mass transit program. Members of the American Public Transit Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1992 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A key House committee voted Wednesday to allocate $110 million for construction of the Los Angeles Metro Rail system next year--considerably less than the subway's proponents had sought but more than enough to keep the project on track.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1992 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stray language in a law setting federal transportation policy has slashed by half the federal construction funding for the Metro Red Line and 15 other mass-transit projects across the country, but congressional leaders are scrambling to remedy the problem with a new law. The conflict has its greatest potential effect on Los Angeles, which could lose $65 million for the Hollywood leg of the Red Line subway, on which construction is about to start.
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