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United States Travel Restrictions China

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NEWS
May 8, 1988
China's most prominent dissident, astrophysicist Fang Lizhi, said he would be allowed to make his first visit to the United States since he was expelled from the Communist Party a year ago. Fang said that he plans to attend scientific conferences in Dallas in December and in Australia in August. The outspoken dissident, who once was quoted as describing Marxism as an old, worn-out dress that has to be shed, had been barred from going to the United States and Hong Kong.
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NEWS
March 10, 1989 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
In a new sign of cooling relations between the United States and China, the State Department announced Thursday that it has imposed the same travel restrictions on Chinese employees of the U.N. Secretariat as now are imposed on Soviet Bloc personnel. China's U.N. employees must give notice to the United States any time they want to travel more than 25 miles from Manhattan for anything other than official business.
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NEWS
March 10, 1989 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
In a new sign of cooling relations between the United States and China, the State Department announced Thursday that it has imposed the same travel restrictions on Chinese employees of the U.N. Secretariat as now are imposed on Soviet Bloc personnel. China's U.N. employees must give notice to the United States any time they want to travel more than 25 miles from Manhattan for anything other than official business.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1989 | JIM MANN and RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writers
The number of Chinese diplomats in Los Angeles exceeds the limit agreed upon when China opened its consulate in the city last year, according to knowledgeable U.S. officials. China's new consulate in Los Angeles was supposed to have a staff of 31. But the FBI recently notified the State Department that 38 or 39 Chinese diplomats were working there, and that some Chinese officials in Los Angeles were operating out of their residences rather than the consulate, the sources said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1989 | JIM MANN and RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writers
The number of Chinese diplomats in Los Angeles exceeds the limit agreed upon when China opened its consulate in the city last year, according to knowledgeable U.S. officials. China's new consulate in Los Angeles was supposed to have a staff of 31. But the FBI recently notified the State Department that 38 or 39 Chinese diplomats were working there, and that some Chinese officials in Los Angeles were operating out of their residences rather than the consulate, the sources said.
NEWS
May 8, 1988
China's most prominent dissident, astrophysicist Fang Lizhi, said he would be allowed to make his first visit to the United States since he was expelled from the Communist Party a year ago. Fang said that he plans to attend scientific conferences in Dallas in December and in Australia in August. The outspoken dissident, who once was quoted as describing Marxism as an old, worn-out dress that has to be shed, had been barred from going to the United States and Hong Kong.
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