Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Travel Restrictions Lebanon
IN THE NEWS

United States Travel Restrictions Lebanon

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 4, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Thirteen Americans arrived in Cyprus on Tuesday after following orders by the U.S. government to leave Lebanon, but some vowed to return when the violence subsides. "I hope to go back to Lebanon soon. . . . I left my house just the way it was," said Lois Ann Swenson, of Boscobel, Wis., who arrived with her husband, Leonard, in this southern port. The couple said they were sad to leave Christian East Beirut after running an orphanage for 31 years.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 12, 1987
The U.S. government has seized the passport of the leader of an Arab-American organization who traveled to Lebanon in defiance of an official ban, Administration officials said. The passport of Mohammed T. Mehdi, secretary general of the New York-based National Council of Islamic Affairs, was confiscated by customs officials at Newark airport.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 12, 1987
The U.S. government has seized the passport of the leader of an Arab-American organization who traveled to Lebanon in defiance of an official ban, Administration officials said. The passport of Mohammed T. Mehdi, secretary general of the New York-based National Council of Islamic Affairs, was confiscated by customs officials at Newark airport.
NEWS
February 4, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Thirteen Americans arrived in Cyprus on Tuesday after following orders by the U.S. government to leave Lebanon, but some vowed to return when the violence subsides. "I hope to go back to Lebanon soon. . . . I left my house just the way it was," said Lois Ann Swenson, of Boscobel, Wis., who arrived with her husband, Leonard, in this southern port. The couple said they were sad to leave Christian East Beirut after running an orphanage for 31 years.
NEWS
January 29, 1987 | GAYLORD SHAW, Times Staff Writer
Warning that "no American can be considered safe from terrorist acts" in Lebanon, the State Department on Wednesday invalidated U.S. passports for travel to the strife-torn Middle East country where at least eight Americans currently are held hostage. The restrictions, besides discouraging Americans from going to Lebanon, are intended to put pressure on the estimated 1,500 U.S. citizens still there to leave. Their U.S.
NEWS
January 29, 1987 | GAYLORD SHAW, Times Staff Writer
Warning that "no American can be considered safe from terrorist acts" in Lebanon, the State Department on Wednesday invalidated U.S. passports for travel to the strife-torn Middle East country where at least eight Americans currently are held hostage. The restrictions, besides discouraging Americans from going to Lebanon, are intended to put pressure on the estimated 1,500 U.S. citizens still there to leave. Their U.S.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|