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NEWS
January 28, 1990 | CHARLES HILLINGER
As the Iron Curtain collapses in Eastern Europe, the Ice Curtain is rapidly melting in the Bering Strait separating Alaska and the Soviet Far East. Slammed shut by Stalin in 1948, the back door to the Soviet Union--through Siberia and into the United States through Alaska--is opening in a dramatic fashion. Until recently the mysterious Soviet Far East, one of the most isolated and least-known places on Earth, had been off limits to all foreigners.
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NEWS
August 24, 1991 | Reuters
The State Department on Friday pulled back its travel warning to U.S. citizens planning trips to the Soviet Union, saying the situtation there is rapidly returning to normal. The latest advisory replaces a warning issued Monday following the abortive coup telling Americans to defer travel to the Soviet Union and those there to consider leaving.
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NEWS
August 24, 1991 | Reuters
The State Department on Friday pulled back its travel warning to U.S. citizens planning trips to the Soviet Union, saying the situtation there is rapidly returning to normal. The latest advisory replaces a warning issued Monday following the abortive coup telling Americans to defer travel to the Soviet Union and those there to consider leaving.
SPORTS
July 14, 1990 | From Associated Press
Three Soviet planes have arrived in Seattle for the Goodwill Games, but not before surprising the U.S. Air Force, which was expecting them a day later and had to scramble jets to intercept them over Alaska. An Ilyushin-62 passenger plane carrying Goodwill Games visitors and alternative Soviet art, accompanied by two SU-27 military jet fighters, left the Soviet Union Friday.
NEWS
September 6, 1988
The first high-ranking Soviet delegation from Siberia to travel east across the Bering Strait to the United States was scheduled to reach Alaska today for a 2 1/2-day visit. The visa-free trip by Soviet officials from the Magadan region "will make history," said Alaska Gov. Steve Cowper, "because that region of the Soviet Far East has traditionally been among the most restricted in the Soviet Union."
NEWS
March 2, 1987
Nine Soviet and 13 American editors at a round-table discussion in Washington agreed that each nation could help reporters by loosening travel restrictions. Vitaly Chukseev, a Tass news agency editor formerly assigned to San Francisco, told the American Society of Newspaper Editors panel that he was hampered by State Department requirements that he give 48 hours notice before leaving the city. American editors said U.S.
BUSINESS
October 11, 1988 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
Several major American unions, politically moderate, are trying to host a small delegation of Soviet trade unionists next month. If they could talk with the Soviets, they probably would argue strongly over some matters--and just maybe find a few areas of agreement. However, unless there is a radical policy change by the U.S. State Department, those potentially useful meetings between Soviet and American unionists proposed for Washington, Detroit and New York will not be held.
NEWS
January 30, 1987
U.S. tests found that radiation has declined to acceptable levels in Kiev, and the State Department declared the capital of the Ukraine safe for American travelers. Kiev is about 80 miles from Chernobyl, where a Soviet nuclear reactor disaster last April caused at least 31 deaths. U.S. radiation specialists collected and tested samples of water, food, foliage and soil before lifting the travel advisory.
SPORTS
July 14, 1990 | From Associated Press
Three Soviet planes have arrived in Seattle for the Goodwill Games, but not before surprising the U.S. Air Force, which was expecting them a day later and had to scramble jets to intercept them over Alaska. An Ilyushin-62 passenger plane carrying Goodwill Games visitors and alternative Soviet art, accompanied by two SU-27 military jet fighters, left the Soviet Union Friday.
NEWS
January 28, 1990 | CHARLES HILLINGER
As the Iron Curtain collapses in Eastern Europe, the Ice Curtain is rapidly melting in the Bering Strait separating Alaska and the Soviet Far East. Slammed shut by Stalin in 1948, the back door to the Soviet Union--through Siberia and into the United States through Alaska--is opening in a dramatic fashion. Until recently the mysterious Soviet Far East, one of the most isolated and least-known places on Earth, had been off limits to all foreigners.
BUSINESS
October 11, 1988 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
Several major American unions, politically moderate, are trying to host a small delegation of Soviet trade unionists next month. If they could talk with the Soviets, they probably would argue strongly over some matters--and just maybe find a few areas of agreement. However, unless there is a radical policy change by the U.S. State Department, those potentially useful meetings between Soviet and American unionists proposed for Washington, Detroit and New York will not be held.
NEWS
September 6, 1988
The first high-ranking Soviet delegation from Siberia to travel east across the Bering Strait to the United States was scheduled to reach Alaska today for a 2 1/2-day visit. The visa-free trip by Soviet officials from the Magadan region "will make history," said Alaska Gov. Steve Cowper, "because that region of the Soviet Far East has traditionally been among the most restricted in the Soviet Union."
NEWS
March 2, 1987
Nine Soviet and 13 American editors at a round-table discussion in Washington agreed that each nation could help reporters by loosening travel restrictions. Vitaly Chukseev, a Tass news agency editor formerly assigned to San Francisco, told the American Society of Newspaper Editors panel that he was hampered by State Department requirements that he give 48 hours notice before leaving the city. American editors said U.S.
NEWS
January 30, 1987
U.S. tests found that radiation has declined to acceptable levels in Kiev, and the State Department declared the capital of the Ukraine safe for American travelers. Kiev is about 80 miles from Chernobyl, where a Soviet nuclear reactor disaster last April caused at least 31 deaths. U.S. radiation specialists collected and tested samples of water, food, foliage and soil before lifting the travel advisory.
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