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March 24, 1990 | GEORGE HARDEEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Leaders of the Puyallup Indian Tribe here will join local, state and federal officials today in signing the second largest native land settlement agreement in history. In exchange for relinquishing legal claims to thousands of acres of land owned by non-Indians in and around Tacoma, the tribe will receive $162 million in cash, real estate and economic development programs. Each of the 1,545 Puyallup tribal members over age 21 will receive a cash payment of $20,000 in the next two months.
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NEWS
August 3, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush administration has backed away from a promise made by the Clinton White House that the United States will eventually comply with an international treaty banning land mines, because it believes U.S. forces may need to use the weapon, official correspondence indicates. In a letter to Rep. James P. McGovern (D-Mass.
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NEWS
October 12, 1999 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton made another concession to Republicans on Monday, the eve of the Senate's scheduled vote on the nuclear test-ban treaty, raising the possibility that the two sides may hammer out a deal to avert an almost-certain defeat of the pact. With Senate action expected late today or Wednesday, Clinton gave in to Republican demands that he put in writing a request that the vote be postponed. He wrote to Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott (R-Miss.
NEWS
July 22, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a summit already under siege by up to 100,000 protesters, President Bush found himself under political siege Saturday by his peers from the world's wealthiest nations because of his controversial rejection of a global treaty on climate change.
NEWS
October 15, 1999 | MARK Z. BARABAK and RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITERS
Acting swiftly, Vice President Al Gore injected the nuclear arms issue into the presidential race Thursday by attacking Senate Republicans for sinking the international test ban treaty. The Republican candidates backed their congressional colleagues. Gore's campaign rushed out a television ad accusing the Republican-run Senate of going "against the tide of history" and ending 40 years of bipartisan cooperation on arms control.
NEWS
July 22, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a summit already under siege by up to 100,000 protesters, President Bush found himself under political siege Saturday by his peers from the world's wealthiest nations because of his controversial rejection of a global treaty on climate change.
NEWS
January 5, 2001 | From the Washington Post
In a bid to resuscitate the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, which the Senate resoundingly rejected in October 1999, retired Gen. John M. Shalikashvili is to present a report to President Clinton today recommending steps to build bipartisan support for the pact. Shalikashvili, former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said the treaty should be subject to joint review by the Senate and administration every 10 years.
NEWS
May 11, 2001 | NICK ANDERSON and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush asked Congress on Thursday for expanded authority to negotiate trade agreements, seeking to break through a political stalemate that hindered the Clinton administration. But Bush faces daunting obstacles in his quest for legislation at the heart of his trade agenda. Even though the narrowly divided Congress is led by Republicans who agree with the president's goals, by all accounts any major trade initiative will die without support from at least some Democrats.
NEWS
June 18, 1998 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a speech that underlined the divisions between the United States and some of its closest allies over the scope and operation of a proposed international criminal court, U.N. Ambassador Bill Richardson called Wednesday for a narrowly defined tribunal firmly harnessed to the U.N. Security Council. The U.S.
NEWS
April 17, 1998 | MARK FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four years after the United States signed a global accord condemning torture, federal immigration authorities have finally granted protection to one of the scores of people seeking to use the agreement to avoid deportation, in this case an Iraqi army deserter who had been whipped, punched and hanged by his heels from a ceiling fan. The case creates a potentially broad new class of newcomer for the U.S.
NEWS
July 19, 2001 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Supporters of a treaty to reduce global warming said Wednesday that they are increasingly optimistic about rescuing the pact despite a U.S. rejection, noting that the rest of the world wants success at make-or-break negotiations that begin here today. Prospects for hammering out the last details of the Kyoto Protocol, which seeks to limit emissions of heat-trapping "greenhouse gases," appeared dim before behind-the-scenes discussions got underway this week under the auspices of the U.N.
NEWS
May 11, 2001 | NICK ANDERSON and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush asked Congress on Thursday for expanded authority to negotiate trade agreements, seeking to break through a political stalemate that hindered the Clinton administration. But Bush faces daunting obstacles in his quest for legislation at the heart of his trade agenda. Even though the narrowly divided Congress is led by Republicans who agree with the president's goals, by all accounts any major trade initiative will die without support from at least some Democrats.
BUSINESS
April 29, 2001 | JAMES FLANIGAN
A week ago, the leaders of 34 Western Hemisphere nations, including President Bush, signed an agreement for a Free Trade Area of the Americas, amid shouts of protesters in Quebec City and questions from skeptical legislators back home in Washington; Brasilia, Brazil; and other capitals. But the lowering of tariffs and other obstacles to international trade agreed upon in Quebec are almost a side issue to the far more important trend of foreign direct investment among countries in the hemisphere.
NEWS
April 20, 2001 | EDWIN CHEN and ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Upset over his anti-environment image, President Bush staged a high-profile White House ceremony Thursday to announce that the United States will sign a global treaty to ban 12 lethal chemicals. The Rose Garden event was Bush's most ambitious attempt yet to demonstrate his environmental bona fides after a series of controversial acts widely regarded as pro-industry and anti-environment.
NEWS
January 5, 2001 | From the Washington Post
In a bid to resuscitate the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, which the Senate resoundingly rejected in October 1999, retired Gen. John M. Shalikashvili is to present a report to President Clinton today recommending steps to build bipartisan support for the pact. Shalikashvili, former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said the treaty should be subject to joint review by the Senate and administration every 10 years.
NEWS
January 1, 2001 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a last-minute concession to human rights activists, President Clinton on Sunday authorized the United States to sign a treaty creating the world's first permanent court for crimes against humanity. Sunday was the deadline for signing the accord on the proposed International Criminal Court, which would try people accused of extreme human rights violations--a role that its supporters say is neglected in the global legal system.
NEWS
April 18, 1997 | Associated Press
The Senate voted Thursday to impose tough penalties on anyone dealing with chemical weapons and unanimously agreed to vote on ratification of a global poison gas treaty next week. Democrats dismissed the penalty bill, passed 53-44 on a nearly party-line vote, as unnecessary. Some treaty opponents touted it as an alternative to the sweeping accord ratified by 72 nations that aims to rid the world of chemical weapons.
NEWS
April 9, 1997 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Senate opponents of a long-stalled treaty that would ban the use of chemical weapons softened their resistance Tuesday, raising prospects that the accord could move to the floor for full debate next week. Although Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott (R-Miss.) insisted that no agreement had yet been reached to schedule a vote on the controversial Chemical Weapons Convention, he confirmed that he will meet with leading Democrats today in "hopes that we can get an agreement."
NEWS
October 15, 1999 | MARK Z. BARABAK and RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITERS
Acting swiftly, Vice President Al Gore injected the nuclear arms issue into the presidential race Thursday by attacking Senate Republicans for sinking the international test ban treaty. The Republican candidates backed their congressional colleagues. Gore's campaign rushed out a television ad accusing the Republican-run Senate of going "against the tide of history" and ending 40 years of bipartisan cooperation on arms control.
NEWS
October 12, 1999 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton made another concession to Republicans on Monday, the eve of the Senate's scheduled vote on the nuclear test-ban treaty, raising the possibility that the two sides may hammer out a deal to avert an almost-certain defeat of the pact. With Senate action expected late today or Wednesday, Clinton gave in to Republican demands that he put in writing a request that the vote be postponed. He wrote to Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott (R-Miss.
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