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United States Treaties China

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NEWS
November 18, 1999 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On hearing of the big U.S.-China trade deal this week, workers at Huadu Chicken Co. fell into active discussions of their own situation, a scene replayed in thousands of offices and factories across China. Chickens eat lots of corn, and the company could now have access to American corn that's almost 20% cheaper than local varieties, so that's a plus.
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NEWS
November 18, 1999 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On hearing of the big U.S.-China trade deal this week, workers at Huadu Chicken Co. fell into active discussions of their own situation, a scene replayed in thousands of offices and factories across China. Chickens eat lots of corn, and the company could now have access to American corn that's almost 20% cheaper than local varieties, so that's a plus.
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NEWS
November 16, 1999 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Supporters of China's entry into the World Trade Organization on Monday predicted congressional approval next year, but opponents of the deal vowed an all-out fight, virtually ensuring that Sino-U.S. relations will become an issue in next year's presidential and some congressional campaigns. One indication, just hours after the announcement in Beijing of an agreement between U.S.
NEWS
November 16, 1999 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Supporters of China's entry into the World Trade Organization on Monday predicted congressional approval next year, but opponents of the deal vowed an all-out fight, virtually ensuring that Sino-U.S. relations will become an issue in next year's presidential and some congressional campaigns. One indication, just hours after the announcement in Beijing of an agreement between U.S.
NEWS
November 16, 1999 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the fond hopes of its champions, the new U.S.-China trade accord will be far more profound than a rule book for commerce between two large nations. Some observers argued Monday that China's formal entry into the world's economic club--for which the deal paves the way--could change its behavior in far-reaching ways, by giving rise to new internal pressures for democratic reforms and by binding Beijing more tightly to an international legal system that it has long disdained.
NEWS
November 16, 1999 | EVELYN IRITANI and MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The landmark U.S.-China trade deal signed here Monday offers U.S. companies unprecedented access to China's 1.2 billion consumers and is good news for such bellwether California industries as technology, Hollywood and agriculture. Over the long term, the agreement also promises benefits for U.S. Internet and telecommunications firms, the auto industry, banks and Wall Street.
NEWS
April 11, 1999 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton's summit with Chinese Premier Zhu Rongji nearly ended in disaster Saturday after Zhu publicly disavowed a joint statement the White House had issued two days earlier, as well as a far-reaching series of proposed agreements for U.S. access to China's vast markets.
NEWS
November 16, 1999 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After years of talks, missteps and posturing, Beijing and Washington finally signed a deal this afternoon at China's Trade Ministry, paving the way for China to enter the World Trade Organization by the beginning of the next round of negotiations starting in Seattle on Nov. 30. Although details were sketchy, the agreement holds out the promise that American companies will gain greater access to China's telecommunications, financial and other service markets. U.S.
NEWS
November 16, 1999 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the fond hopes of its champions, the new U.S.-China trade accord will be far more profound than a rule book for commerce between two large nations. Some observers argued Monday that China's formal entry into the world's economic club--for which the deal paves the way--could change its behavior in far-reaching ways, by giving rise to new internal pressures for democratic reforms and by binding Beijing more tightly to an international legal system that it has long disdained.
NEWS
November 16, 1999 | EVELYN IRITANI and MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The landmark U.S.-China trade deal signed here Monday offers U.S. companies unprecedented access to China's 1.2 billion consumers and is good news for such bellwether California industries as technology, Hollywood and agriculture. Over the long term, the agreement also promises benefits for U.S. Internet and telecommunications firms, the auto industry, banks and Wall Street.
NEWS
November 16, 1999 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After years of talks, missteps and posturing, Beijing and Washington finally signed a deal this afternoon at China's Trade Ministry, paving the way for China to enter the World Trade Organization by the beginning of the next round of negotiations starting in Seattle on Nov. 30. Although details were sketchy, the agreement holds out the promise that American companies will gain greater access to China's telecommunications, financial and other service markets. U.S.
NEWS
November 16, 1999 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For U.S. negotiators, peace and quiet were hard to come by during their six harrowing days trying to land a deal to bring China into the World Trade Organization. At one crucial moment, U.S. Trade Representative Charlene Barshefsky and National Economic Council Chairman Gene Sperling hurriedly repaired to the waiting room outside a ladies' room on the 11th floor of China's trade ministry so they could telephone President Clinton.
NEWS
April 11, 1999 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton's summit with Chinese Premier Zhu Rongji nearly ended in disaster Saturday after Zhu publicly disavowed a joint statement the White House had issued two days earlier, as well as a far-reaching series of proposed agreements for U.S. access to China's vast markets.
NEWS
January 19, 1998 | From Reuters
U.S. Defense Secretary William S. Cohen and Chinese Defense Minister Chi Haotian today signed an agreement aimed at avoiding clashes or accidents between warships of their countries at sea, the New China News Agency reported. The Military Maritime Consultation Agreement is a further sign of warming relations between China and the United States. The pact was signed in Beijing's Zhongnanhai Leadership Compound.
NEWS
November 16, 1999 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For U.S. negotiators, peace and quiet were hard to come by during their six harrowing days trying to land a deal to bring China into the World Trade Organization. At one crucial moment, U.S. Trade Representative Charlene Barshefsky and National Economic Council Chairman Gene Sperling hurriedly repaired to the waiting room outside a ladies' room on the 11th floor of China's trade ministry so they could telephone President Clinton.
NEWS
January 19, 1998 | From Reuters
U.S. Defense Secretary William S. Cohen and Chinese Defense Minister Chi Haotian today signed an agreement aimed at avoiding clashes or accidents between warships of their countries at sea, the New China News Agency reported. The Military Maritime Consultation Agreement is a further sign of warming relations between China and the United States. The pact was signed in Beijing's Zhongnanhai Leadership Compound.
NEWS
October 11, 1992 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
China has agreed to sweeping new economic concessions designed to eliminate most of its import quotas, trade restrictions, controls and licensing requirements on U.S.-made products over the next five years, the White House said Saturday. The move, part of a major new trade accord formally signed by U.S. and Chinese negotiators, is expected to open the way for billions of dollars of additional U.S. exports to China on products ranging from computers and auto parts to medical equipment.
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