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United States Treaties Greece

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September 22, 1988
Talks on U.S. use of Greek military bases will resume in Athens early next month, Greek Foreign Minister Karolos Papoulias said after meeting in Washington with Secretary of State George P. Shultz. But there has been no change on the deadlocked issue that prompted the United States to break off the talks Sept. 5--Greece's demand for U.S. forces to vacate Hellenikon air base at Athens airport, Papoulias said.
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NEWS
July 9, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Greek and U.S. officials on Sunday signed a defense treaty allowing two major U.S. military bases to remain in the country for at least eight years. Washington threw in 62 warplanes and four naval destroyers to sweeten the deal. The treaty, which still must be ratified by the Greek Parliament and the U.S. Congress, guarantees defense of Greece's territory against any hostile country, including neighbor and fellow NATO ally Turkey.
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NEWS
July 9, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Greek and U.S. officials on Sunday signed a defense treaty allowing two major U.S. military bases to remain in the country for at least eight years. Washington threw in 62 warplanes and four naval destroyers to sweeten the deal. The treaty, which still must be ratified by the Greek Parliament and the U.S. Congress, guarantees defense of Greece's territory against any hostile country, including neighbor and fellow NATO ally Turkey.
NEWS
May 31, 1990 | From Reuters
After years of bitter disputes and tough negotiations, the United States and Greece signed a new defense agreement Wednesday allowing American bases to stay in the eastern Mediterranean country. The major installations covered by the agreement are a U.S. Air Force base and a Navy base on the island of Crete and about 20 smaller installations spread across the country.
NEWS
May 31, 1990 | From Reuters
After years of bitter disputes and tough negotiations, the United States and Greece signed a new defense agreement Wednesday allowing American bases to stay in the eastern Mediterranean country. The major installations covered by the agreement are a U.S. Air Force base and a Navy base on the island of Crete and about 20 smaller installations spread across the country.
NEWS
August 25, 1989
A U.S. magistrate in Boston ordered that fugitive financier George Koskotas be extradited to Greece to face charges of embezzling more than $200 million from the Bank of Crete. Magistrate Joyce Alexander rejected Koskotas' arguments that he would face possible assassination if returned to his homeland and that the charges are political, a category of offense that is not extraditable under a U.S.-Greek treaty. She also said that Koskotas, 35, raised no defense to bar his extradition.
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