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United States Treaties Japan

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NEWS
April 5, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. and Japanese negotiators reached tentative agreement Wednesday on the major elements of a set of sweeping new measures to help reduce the $49-billion U.S. trade deficit with Japan--including significant concessions by Japan toward opening its market to more imports. The 50-page document, which officials said still includes a few, relatively minor "loose ends," was being quickly reviewed by the Japanese Cabinet in time for another, presumably final negotiating session today.
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NEWS
October 26, 1995 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a major move to calm a national uproar here against American military bases, the United States agreed Wednesday to new criminal procedures allowing Japanese to gain early custody of U.S. military suspects in rape and murder cases. The agreement was hammered out seven tense weeks after a 12-year-old girl was brutally beaten and raped, allegedly by three U.S. servicemen, on the southern island of Okinawa.
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NEWS
July 21, 1995 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States and Japan averted a trade war Thursday night by agreeing to open up new cargo routes for both nations and renegotiate a 43-year-old aviation treaty that promises to dramatically reshape the competition for lucrative transpacific routes. The accord could signal improved U.S.-Japan trade relations, following by only three weeks the settlement of a very bitter and contentious dispute over U.S. access to the Japanese auto market.
NEWS
October 26, 1995 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Masahide Ota fought for the Japanese militarists during the Pacific War and studied under American democrats after defeat--but never lost his fierce pride and identity as a member of the noble Ryukyu kingdom now known as Okinawa. Today, the Okinawa governor has taken on both the Japanese and American governments to win what he believes is best for his beloved island chain in southern Japan: a reduction and eventual elimination of all U.S.
NEWS
March 19, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
This tiny hamlet of sugar cane farmers, nestled quietly in a thick forest in the north of Okinawa, is waging a symbolic battle that may signal a new era in the military alliance binding the United States and Japan. The U.S. Marine Corps wants to build a landing pad about a mile away to train Marines in the tactical use of Harrier jets, a combat aircraft that can take off and land vertically.
BUSINESS
June 14, 1990 | ART PINE and SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush Administration moved Wednesday to step up pressure on Japan to end what it considers backsliding on key promises that Japan made last April in a high-level accord designed to ease trade tensions between the two countries. U.S. officials said Secretary of State James A. Baker III plans to warn Japan of the growing U.S. frustration--and to demand prompt action by the Tokyo government--during a meeting Friday with Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Nakayama in San Francisco.
NEWS
February 3, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first televised debate in 30 years among leaders of Japan's major political parties, Socialist Party Chairwoman Takako Doi declared Friday that her organization welcomes proposals by some Americans to abolish the U.S.-Japan Security Treaty. The Socialists had been trying to remove an image of radicalism by softening their traditional advocacy of abrogation of the pact, and Doi had declared that a Socialist-led government would not abrogate the treaty unilaterally.
NEWS
April 6, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States and Japan formally unveiled their new landmark trade accord Thursday, but Bush Administration officials--and many lawmakers--warned that it is only a first step toward the eventual full-fledged opening of the Japanese market. While welcoming the accord as "substantial," U.S. Trade Representative Carla A. Hills cautioned that the steps Japan has pledged to take would probably have "very little" immediate impact in reducing the $49-billion U.S. trade deficit with Japan. Sen.
BUSINESS
April 4, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan agreed Tuesday on the major elements of an accord to end its longstanding ban on government purchases of foreign-made commercial satellites, but U.S. and Japanese negotiators said they still must iron out more details before the pact becomes final. Under the proposal, Tokyo will obtain all future commercial satellites through open, "non-discriminatory" bidding instead of protecting its domestic satellite manufacturing firms.
NEWS
July 21, 1995 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States and Japan averted a trade war Thursday night by agreeing to open up new cargo routes for both nations and renegotiate a 43-year-old aviation treaty that promises to dramatically reshape the competition for lucrative transpacific routes. The accord could signal improved U.S.-Japan trade relations, following by only three weeks the settlement of a very bitter and contentious dispute over U.S. access to the Japanese auto market.
NEWS
September 22, 1992 | JIM MANN and SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Hiroomi Kurisu has his own ideas about the future of the U.S. naval base at Yokosuka, which has served for more than four decades as one of the main American military installations in Japan. "Japan does not have a history of hosting foreign bases," he says. "We should change the system and allow the stationing of American troops (in Japan) only in times of emergency," with Japan leasing Yokosuka and other facilities to the United States in quieter times.
BUSINESS
April 6, 1992 | From Associated Press
U.S. and Japanese negotiators reached agreement Sunday on removing barriers that have blocked sales of foreign paper products in Japan. U.S. Trade Representative Carla Anderson Hills, said the agreement will widen American companies' sales of paper and paperboard products in a Japanese market estimated at $27 billion annually. "This agreement is good for our industry and workers, good for the Japanese consumer and good for our global trading system," Hills said.
NEWS
December 25, 1991 | From Associated Press
The Foreign Ministry said Tuesday that the Japanese public's resentment over Washington's economic and political pressure is growing and that support is weakening for Japan's alliance with the United States. The unusually frank assessment came in the ministry's annual report, released just two weeks before President Bush is to visit Tokyo. "With the disappearance of the East-West confrontation, it cannot be denied that the alliance . . .
BUSINESS
June 12, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The United States and Japan signed a five-year agreement aimed at boosting to at least 20% the foreign share of the Japanese computer chip market by the end of next year. Ambassador Carla Anderson Hills, the U.S. trade representative, and Ryohei Murata, Japanese ambassador to Washington, led the signing ceremony at Hills' office, where negotiations concluded a week ago. The pact takes effect Aug. 1.
BUSINESS
June 10, 1991 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The ink was barely dry last week on a new agreement to give American semiconductor producers greater access to Japanese markets when it became apparent that the two sides had very different views of what they had just agreed upon. "We have an agreement that says we should have a 20% market share by the end of 1992," W. J. (Jerry) Sanders III, chief executive of Sunnyvale-based Advanced Micro Devices Inc.
BUSINESS
June 4, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
American and Japanese trade officials are expected to announce today that they have reached agreement on a new pact governing the computer chip trade between the two countries. The accord is an extension of a five-year agreement signed in 1986 and calls for sales of foreign semiconductors in Japan to reach 20% by the end of next year. It will also result in the lifting of $165 million in trade sanctions imposed on Japan two years ago.
BUSINESS
June 12, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The United States and Japan signed a five-year agreement aimed at boosting to at least 20% the foreign share of the Japanese computer chip market by the end of next year. Ambassador Carla Anderson Hills, the U.S. trade representative, and Ryohei Murata, Japanese ambassador to Washington, led the signing ceremony at Hills' office, where negotiations concluded a week ago. The pact takes effect Aug. 1.
BUSINESS
June 5, 1991 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States and Japan announced Tuesday that they have signed a tough, new trade pact that should open up Japanese markets to American computer chips, while providing greater protection against the illegal "dumping" of Japanese semiconductors in the U.S. market.
BUSINESS
June 4, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
American and Japanese trade officials are expected to announce today that they have reached agreement on a new pact governing the computer chip trade between the two countries. The accord is an extension of a five-year agreement signed in 1986 and calls for sales of foreign semiconductors in Japan to reach 20% by the end of next year. It will also result in the lifting of $165 million in trade sanctions imposed on Japan two years ago.
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