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United States Treaties Mexico

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BUSINESS
October 8, 1991 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If a free-trade agreement between the United States and Mexico is ratified, it will bring a wealth of economic benefits to California and Mexico, including a tripling of trade between the two in the 1990s, according to a study released Monday by Bank of America. California will "gain considerably" from such an agreement primarily because Mexico will become more prosperous, the study predicted. "We are quite optimistic about the effects of a free-trade agreement," said Frederick L.
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NEWS
June 10, 2000 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton and Mexican President Ernesto Zedillo, facing the rapidly approaching ends of their tenures, on Friday glossed over unresolved disputes between their governments and congratulated each other on the generally good relations between the sometimes contentious neighbors.
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NEWS
November 13, 1997 | Reuters
Mexico and the United States will sign a historic treaty today defining the territorial waters of the two countries, 19 years after an original accord on the issue, Mexican officials said Wednesday. The pact, due to be signed by presidents Clinton and Ernesto Zedillo in Washington, should put to rest disputes over the U.S.-Mexico dividing line in the oil-rich Gulf of Mexico and the fisheries of the Pacific.
NEWS
February 16, 1998 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration, weary of the bruising annual debate with Congress over whether to certify that Mexico and other nations are cooperating in the war on illicit drugs, wants to drop that process altogether and replace it with an international treaty. A Western Hemisphere treaty on drugs has been discussed for several years. For the first time, however, the administration has said it regards the treaty as a substitute for certification--rather than an extra weapon in the drug fight.
BUSINESS
December 5, 1990 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a prelude to a possible three-nation free-trade agreement, the United States, Mexico and Canada will begin talks on transportation issues in Washington next week, U.S. officials announced here Tuesday. The talks are part of efforts to establish a three-nation free-trade zone, said John Negroponte, U.S. ambassador to Mexico.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1991 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush announced Tuesday that Canada will join the United States in trying to forge a free-trade agreement with Mexico, which could be a step toward the President's goal of creating a giant international trading bloc that ultimately would span the hemisphere from Point Barrow to the Strait of Magellan.
BUSINESS
February 1, 1991 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The California World Trade Commission on Thursday endorsed the concept of a free-trade agreement between the United States and Mexico and recommended that the upcoming negotiations tackle issues that recently derailed four years of international trade talks.
BUSINESS
February 1, 1991 | JUANITA DARLING
U.S. officials are taking pains to assure their Mexican counterparts that negotiations for a free-trade agreement between the two countries will proceed despite the Persian Gulf War. U.S. Embassy officials have been quick to point out President Bush's brief mention of the impending negotiations in his State of the Union address Tuesday.
BUSINESS
January 30, 1991 | From Reuters
Mexican, U.S. and Canadian officials have agreed that Canada should take part in talks for a three-way North American free-trade pact, diplomats and business leaders said this week. They said the decision was reached during a series of closed-door meetings between negotiators earlier this month and finalized in a meeting of the trade ministers of the three North American countries in Washington last week. "I understand that they agreed to proceed to have trilateral free trade talks. . . .
NEWS
November 13, 1997 | Reuters
Mexico and the United States will sign a historic treaty today defining the territorial waters of the two countries, 19 years after an original accord on the issue, Mexican officials said Wednesday. The pact, due to be signed by presidents Clinton and Ernesto Zedillo in Washington, should put to rest disputes over the U.S.-Mexico dividing line in the oil-rich Gulf of Mexico and the fisheries of the Pacific.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1997 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN
In January 1847, at a small ranch house near the Cahuenga Pass, Mexican Gen. Andres Pico (1810-1876) secured his place in American history by signing the treaty ending hostilities in California against U.S. forces led by John C. Fremont. Known as the Articles of Capitulation, the treaty would help pave the way for the better-known Treaty of Guadelupe Hidalgo a year later, in which Mexico relinquished its claim to California, allowing its entry into the union as the 31st state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1997
The diggers on Lankershim Boulevard in Studio City knew what they were after. They just had no idea it would be so impeccably preserved after lying under just six inches of earth for about 100 years. Archeologists working with the Metropolitan Transportation Authority on the subway project showed off their latest find Monday: large sections of the original foundation of Campo de Cahuenga. It was where Gen. Andres Pico and Lt. Col. John C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1997 | DADE HAYES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The diggers on Lankershim Boulevard knew what they were after. They just had no idea it would be so impeccably preserved after lying under just 6 inches of earth for about 100 years. Archeologists working with the Metropolitan Transportation Authority on the subway project showed off their latest find Monday: the original foundation of Campo de Cahuenga. The onetime cattle ranch is where Gen. Andres Pico and Lt. Col. John C.
NEWS
February 16, 1995 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citing "exploding" costs of incarcerating illegal immigrant criminals, Gov. Pete Wilson called on U.S. authorities Wednesday to renegotiate treaties with Mexico and other nations so that thousands of California inmates could complete prison terms in their homelands. The governor, unveiling a new state report on the issue, specifically called for the removal of requirements that inmates give consent before being sent home to complete their prison terms.
NEWS
September 6, 1993 | BILL STALL, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
State Treasurer Kathleen Brown disclosed Sunday that she has decided to oppose the North American Free Trade Agreement because it does not adequately protect California against the loss of jobs to Mexico. In reversing her position, Brown, a probable candidate for California governor next year, now has concluded that the treaty "sells California, our workers and our country short," she wrote in a letter to President Clinton dated Labor Day. Brown told The Times that she changed her position after studying the recently negotiated NAFTA side agreements on labor and the environment, and concluded they did not contain the protections that California should have.
NEWS
May 24, 1991 | CHRIS KRAUL, SAN DIEGO COUNTY BUSINESS EDITOR
There is no doubt in Arturo Espinoza's mind that a free-trade agreement between the United States and Mexico would be great for his business. Espinoza, the manager of an electric supply company in Chula Vista, said such an accord would dramatically boost sales to contractors south of the border by eliminating the tariffs that Mexican customers now pay. But Joseph S. Francis could not disagree more.
NEWS
May 25, 1991 | PATRICK MCDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At closing time in Tijuana's "Industrial City" east of downtown, the streets fill with young workers, mostly teen-age women, departing from jobs in foreign-owned assembly plants known as maquiladoras. The spotless paved streets and the rows of factories--housing high-tech manufacturing giants such as Sanyo, Matsushita and Casio--belong to a well-oiled industrial metropolis that employs 70,000 people in more than 500 plants in this border city.
BUSINESS
February 16, 1993 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
Maybe Ross Perot didn't derail the "fast-tracked" North American Free Trade Agreement, but it was hit a telling blow when he succinctly warned there would be a "giant sucking sound of jobs being pulled out of this country" into Mexico if NAFTA is not killed by Congress. Perot's catchy, widely quoted phrase used during the presidential debates neatly summarized the problem.
NEWS
January 9, 1993 | JOHN M. BRODER and PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President-elect Bill Clinton, reiterating his campaign position on the North American Free Trade Agreement, on Friday promised to seek approval of the pact provided it is amended to address his concerns about its effect on the environment and American jobs. After a meeting here with Mexican President Carlos Salinas de Gortari, Clinton said he will appoint a senior official shortly after his inauguration to oversee ratification of the treaty.
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