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United States Treaties North Korea

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NEWS
December 8, 1998 | From Associated Press
The United States could offer economic and diplomatic benefits to North Korea for access to a suspected North Korean nuclear weapons site, South Korean President Kim Dae Jung proposed Monday. Kim made the proposal during a meeting with William J. Perry, the newly appointed U.S. government policy coordinator on North Korea. The former U.S. defense minister arrived Sunday on a three-nation Asia tour, which includes stops in Tokyo and Beijing.
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NEWS
February 23, 2001 | From Associated Press
In a sharp outburst Thursday, North Korea threatened to scrap missile and nuclear accords with Washington and railed against the Bush administration's plans for a missile defense system. The new U.S. administration's foreign and national security teams are adopting a "hard-line stance" toward Pyongyang, the Foreign Ministry said in a statement carried in English by the official Korean Central News Agency. Washington wants Pyongyang "to totally disarm itself first. The U.S.
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NEWS
December 9, 1998 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After tense talks, U.S. and North Korean negotiators agreed Tuesday to meet again later this week to try to break a deadlock over American demands to inspect a suspected nuclear weapons facility in North Korea. Some U.S. officials said the decision to resume talks Thursday in New York was a positive sign given the mounting tension and war of words between Washington and the Communist regime. The talks began Friday in New York and had shifted to Washington this week.
NEWS
December 9, 1998 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After tense talks, U.S. and North Korean negotiators agreed Tuesday to meet again later this week to try to break a deadlock over American demands to inspect a suspected nuclear weapons facility in North Korea. Some U.S. officials said the decision to resume talks Thursday in New York was a positive sign given the mounting tension and war of words between Washington and the Communist regime. The talks began Friday in New York and had shifted to Washington this week.
NEWS
December 6, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Senior Clinton administration officials are threatening to end a historic 1994 nuclear pact with North Korea if that country does not allow inspections of a suspicious underground construction site, the New York Times reports today. In the 1994 pact, North Korea promised to freeze its nuclear weapons program in exchange for billions of dollars of energy assistance. North Korean officials described the threat to end the agreement as nearly an act of war, the Times said. Former U.S.
NEWS
August 14, 1994 | From Times Wire Services
A senior North Korean official said Saturday that a nuclear accord between North Korea and the United States will help forge a new era of normal relations between the two countries by establishing a basis for enhanced "trust and confidence" on nuclear issues and other matters. In a rare interview, Deputy Foreign Minister Kang Sok Ju, the chief North Korean negotiator on nuclear matters, hailed the two-page statement of understanding approved by the U.S.
NEWS
October 18, 1994 | From Times Wire Services
The United States and North Korea reached a draft agreement to ease months of tension over the North's nuclear program, the chief U.S. negotiator said late Monday. Robert L. Gallucci said that the draft will be sent to Washington and to Pyongyang for approval and that negotiators hope to sign the document in Geneva on Friday.
NEWS
February 23, 2001 | From Associated Press
In a sharp outburst Thursday, North Korea threatened to scrap missile and nuclear accords with Washington and railed against the Bush administration's plans for a missile defense system. The new U.S. administration's foreign and national security teams are adopting a "hard-line stance" toward Pyongyang, the Foreign Ministry said in a statement carried in English by the official Korean Central News Agency. Washington wants Pyongyang "to totally disarm itself first. The U.S.
NEWS
October 15, 1994 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration is preparing to conclude a far-reaching new agreement with North Korea that will permanently freeze that country's nuclear weapons program but also will postpone for several years the requirement that it submit to special inspections of its nuclear waste dumps, U.S. officials said Friday. Under the deal, the United States and North Korea will set up liaison offices in each other's capitals within six months, the first step toward establishing diplomatic relations.
NEWS
December 8, 1998 | From Associated Press
The United States could offer economic and diplomatic benefits to North Korea for access to a suspected North Korean nuclear weapons site, South Korean President Kim Dae Jung proposed Monday. Kim made the proposal during a meeting with William J. Perry, the newly appointed U.S. government policy coordinator on North Korea. The former U.S. defense minister arrived Sunday on a three-nation Asia tour, which includes stops in Tokyo and Beijing.
NEWS
December 6, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Senior Clinton administration officials are threatening to end a historic 1994 nuclear pact with North Korea if that country does not allow inspections of a suspicious underground construction site, the New York Times reports today. In the 1994 pact, North Korea promised to freeze its nuclear weapons program in exchange for billions of dollars of energy assistance. North Korean officials described the threat to end the agreement as nearly an act of war, the Times said. Former U.S.
NEWS
October 18, 1994 | From Times Wire Services
The United States and North Korea reached a draft agreement to ease months of tension over the North's nuclear program, the chief U.S. negotiator said late Monday. Robert L. Gallucci said that the draft will be sent to Washington and to Pyongyang for approval and that negotiators hope to sign the document in Geneva on Friday.
NEWS
October 15, 1994 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration is preparing to conclude a far-reaching new agreement with North Korea that will permanently freeze that country's nuclear weapons program but also will postpone for several years the requirement that it submit to special inspections of its nuclear waste dumps, U.S. officials said Friday. Under the deal, the United States and North Korea will set up liaison offices in each other's capitals within six months, the first step toward establishing diplomatic relations.
NEWS
August 14, 1994 | From Times Wire Services
A senior North Korean official said Saturday that a nuclear accord between North Korea and the United States will help forge a new era of normal relations between the two countries by establishing a basis for enhanced "trust and confidence" on nuclear issues and other matters. In a rare interview, Deputy Foreign Minister Kang Sok Ju, the chief North Korean negotiator on nuclear matters, hailed the two-page statement of understanding approved by the U.S.
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