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United States Treaties Panama

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December 21, 1989 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A massive U.S. invasion force on Wednesday overthrew the regime of Panamanian strongman Manuel A. Noriega, chasing the dictator into hiding with an air and infantry assault that left at least 15 American GIs dead. The White House offered a $1-million reward for information leading to Noriega's capture.
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NEWS
September 25, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The United States and Panama announced that they had failed to negotiate an agreement to permit American troops to remain in Panama beyond the end of the century. The Panama Canal treaties require the departure of the soldiers by Dec. 31, 1999, when control over the waterway reverts to Panama. Since 1997, the two countries had sought to agree on establishing a multinational counternarcotics center in which military personnel from the U.S. and other hemispheric countries would take part.
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NEWS
September 25, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The United States and Panama announced that they had failed to negotiate an agreement to permit American troops to remain in Panama beyond the end of the century. The Panama Canal treaties require the departure of the soldiers by Dec. 31, 1999, when control over the waterway reverts to Panama. Since 1997, the two countries had sought to agree on establishing a multinational counternarcotics center in which military personnel from the U.S. and other hemispheric countries would take part.
NEWS
August 28, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The cry of protest in Latin America has traditionally been, "Yankees, go home!" In Panama these days, it's, "Yankees, please stay!" As the date approaches for the withdrawal of 10,000 American troops and the closing of U.S. military bases as part of the 1977 Panama Canal Treaties, Panamanians are getting cold feet. Nationalist fervor that once demanded an end to American dominance is being replaced by economic reality.
NEWS
November 3, 1988
The Soviet Union officially signed on to the 1977 Panama Canal Treaties by agreeing to recognize the "permanent neutrality" of the strategic waterway in wartime as well as peacetime. In a ceremony at the Organization of American States headquarters in Washington, Soviet Ambassador Yuri V. Dubinin presented a state paper signed by Soviet President Mikhail S.
NEWS
July 7, 1987 | DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writer
A special envoy of the Panamanian government met Monday with Assistant Secretary of State Elliott Abrams in an effort to calm the furor over a mob attack on the U.S. Embassy in Panama City last week, State Department officials said. Veteran diplomat Aquilino Boyd, a former ambassador to Washington, met for an hour with Abrams. He also plans to see other Administration officials and congressional leaders this week.
NEWS
January 3, 1990 | From Associated Press
Two co-defendants of Gen. Manuel A. Noriega appeared in court Tuesday to answer drug charges, but both of their attorneys challenged the federal government's right to extradite them from Panama. Daniel Miranda, 36, gave only his name and age through an interpreter to a federal magistrate. His attorney, Michael O'Kane, then said he would remain mute throughout the proceeding. "This is a violation of the Panama Canal Treaty," the seasoned criminal attorney said.
NEWS
January 2, 1990 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The American transfer to Panama of control of the Panama Canal took a quiet but significant step forward Monday when administration of the waterway was turned over to a Panamanian. With public attention focused on negotiations among the United States, Panama and the Vatican to force former Panamanian dictator Manuel A. Noriega out of the sanctuary of the Vatican's embassy here, there was no ceremony, not even a public statement, noting the change of administration.
NEWS
August 28, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The cry of protest in Latin America has traditionally been, "Yankees, go home!" In Panama these days, it's, "Yankees, please stay!" As the date approaches for the withdrawal of 10,000 American troops and the closing of U.S. military bases as part of the 1977 Panama Canal Treaties, Panamanians are getting cold feet. Nationalist fervor that once demanded an end to American dominance is being replaced by economic reality.
NEWS
November 9, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Bush Administration has devised a plan it says ensures U.S. compliance with the spirit of the Panama Canal Treaties without violating its policy of avoiding contact with the Panamanian government. The treaties specify that, on Jan. 1, 1990, a Panamanian must take charge of the U.S. government agency that runs the canal. The Administration, while promising to abide by the treaties, has said it will not consider any nominee proposed by Gen. Manuel A. Noriega. U.S.
NEWS
April 20, 1991 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not so long ago, in the wake of the American overthrow of dictator Manuel A. Noriega, being associated with the United States was a Panamanian political badge of honor. Today, to some, it's grounds for impeachment. The street peddlers who once waved down motorists with fast-selling T-shirts celebrating Operation Just Cause, as the December, 1989, invasion was called, have traded pro-U.S. souvenirs for bananas, oranges and Korean toys.
NEWS
January 3, 1990 | From Associated Press
Two co-defendants of Gen. Manuel A. Noriega appeared in court Tuesday to answer drug charges, but both of their attorneys challenged the federal government's right to extradite them from Panama. Daniel Miranda, 36, gave only his name and age through an interpreter to a federal magistrate. His attorney, Michael O'Kane, then said he would remain mute throughout the proceeding. "This is a violation of the Panama Canal Treaty," the seasoned criminal attorney said.
NEWS
January 2, 1990 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The American transfer to Panama of control of the Panama Canal took a quiet but significant step forward Monday when administration of the waterway was turned over to a Panamanian. With public attention focused on negotiations among the United States, Panama and the Vatican to force former Panamanian dictator Manuel A. Noriega out of the sanctuary of the Vatican's embassy here, there was no ceremony, not even a public statement, noting the change of administration.
NEWS
December 28, 1989 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Resisting American diplomatic pressure, the Vatican said Wednesday that it will not turn deposed Panamanian dictator Manuel A. Noriega over to the United States. But U.S. officials said they still hope to change Pope John Paul II's mind, and President Bush may send a special envoy to Rome to argue the case. Vatican spokesman Joaquin Navarro suggested that the Holy See might consider handing Noriega over to Panama's new government, but he said that regime has made no official request.
NEWS
December 28, 1989 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Panamanian President Guillermo Endara demanded Wednesday that the Vatican revoke the sanctuary given former dictator Manuel A. Noriega in the papal embassy here and "tell him to leave." "We believe Gen. Noriega's crimes are not political," Endara said at a news conference. "He is a common criminal of the worst kind--homicide and narco-trafficking. I feel the nuncio (Vatican envoy Jose Sebastian Laboa) should in the very near future ask the deposed dictator to leave."
NEWS
December 21, 1989 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A massive U.S. invasion force on Wednesday overthrew the regime of Panamanian strongman Manuel A. Noriega, chasing the dictator into hiding with an air and infantry assault that left at least 15 American GIs dead. The White House offered a $1-million reward for information leading to Noriega's capture.
NEWS
December 28, 1989 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Resisting American diplomatic pressure, the Vatican said Wednesday that it will not turn deposed Panamanian dictator Manuel A. Noriega over to the United States. But U.S. officials said they still hope to change Pope John Paul II's mind, and President Bush may send a special envoy to Rome to argue the case. Vatican spokesman Joaquin Navarro suggested that the Holy See might consider handing Noriega over to Panama's new government, but he said that regime has made no official request.
NEWS
December 21, 1989 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Panama was born of American military intervention--President Theodore Roosevelt even advanced his "big stick" policy at its creation--and for 86 years this small nation has served as one of the leading examples of the use of American imperial might in the Western Hemisphere.
NEWS
December 21, 1989 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In less than two weeks, day-to-day operations of the Panama Canal are scheduled to be put into the hands of a Panamanian--despite the most acute crisis in the long, uneasy relationship between the country that built it and the nation destined to own it. For several hours early Wednesday, as American armed forces battled the troops of Gen. Manuel A.
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