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United States Treaties Philippines

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NEWS
September 16, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Philippines Senate today formally rejected a new military base treaty with the United States, plunging the Philippines into an economic and political crisis over the future of the Subic Bay Naval Base, America's last military outpost in Southeast Asia. The 12-11 vote by the Senate came a day after President Corazon Aquino announced that she will seek a national referendum to decide the base question, attempting to override the Senate action with a popular vote.
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NEWS
October 3, 1991 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a compromise move, Philippine President Corazon Aquino announced Wednesday that her government will give the United States three years, rent free, to withdraw military forces from Subic Bay, America's largest naval base in Asia. U.S. Embassy officials here were guarded in response, saying the offer--far less time than they had hoped--will be studied in Washington. A 1994 pullout would end nearly a century-old American military presence here.
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NEWS
August 17, 1990 | From Reuters
Philippine Defense Secretary Fidel V. Ramos on Thursday ordered increased security around U.S. installations and private companies in the Philippines after a threat by right-wing army rebels to launch an anti-government offensive. He told reporters that he had ordered a security alert around potential U.S. targets, "to make sure that U.S. installations, including those in the private sector that are very vulnerable and sensitive to harassment and bombings, are fully protected."
NEWS
September 28, 1991 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Diplomats attending a quiet meeting at the white-columned U.S. Embassy here suddenly burst into applause when White House special negotiator Richard L. Armitage walked in July 17, shortly after finishing 14 months of contentious talks over the future of the giant U.S. Navy base at Subic Bay. Many in the room knew that Armitage had come prepared to pay Manila $250 million a year for a seven-year lease.
NEWS
September 20, 1990 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States will go to the negotiating table here today ready to propose a sharp reduction, but not an end, to the U.S. military presence in the Philippines over the next 10 to 12 years, U.S. officials said Wednesday. Specifically, sources said, the Pentagon, wants to keep as many as 5,000 troops, about a third of the present number, and retain access well into the next century for visiting U.S. troops, ships and planes to what are now American-run military installations.
NEWS
August 30, 1988
Most Filipinos favor the retention of strategic U.S military bases in their nation but overwhelmingly believe Washington should pay more money in compensation, according to a government survey made public in Manila. The survey of 2,000 respondents nationwide showed that 80% favored keeping the bases, with 39% approving their continued presence without conditions and 41% saying the bases treaty should be revised, presidential press secretary Teodoro Benigno announced.
NEWS
October 7, 1988 | Associated Press
Philippine and U.S. officials said Thursday they have narrowed differences over U.S. military bases here and are nearing agreement on their status through 1991. President Corazon Aquino and Undersecretary of State Michael H. Armacost gave the assessment after a 45-minute meeting, which the U.S. official described as a "very good talk." Filipino and American panels began talks last April on the status of Clark Air Base, the Subic Bay Naval Base and four smaller installations.
NEWS
August 25, 1990 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The future of the largest and oldest U.S. military bases overseas, both of them here in the Philippines, may hinge on the Persian Gulf crisis. With new negotiations on whether to extend leases for the bases now scheduled to begin on Sept. 10, analysts say the rapid U.S. military mobilization has forced Pentagon planners to refocus on potential uses for Clark Air Base, Subic Bay Naval Base and four smaller military facilities.
NEWS
October 3, 1991 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a compromise move, Philippine President Corazon Aquino announced Wednesday that her government will give the United States three years, rent free, to withdraw military forces from Subic Bay, America's largest naval base in Asia. U.S. Embassy officials here were guarded in response, saying the offer--far less time than they had hoped--will be studied in Washington. A 1994 pullout would end nearly a century-old American military presence here.
NEWS
September 12, 1991 | ABBY TAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Philippine Senate began crucial debates on Wednesday, apparently intent on burying a military bases treaty with the United States and ending the 93-year American military presence here. An aide to President Corazon Aquino, meanwhile, said Aquino will seek a referendum to decide the bases issue if the Senate refuses to approve the pact.
NEWS
September 18, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Corazon Aquino's government on Tuesday announced a series of legal maneuvers designed to offset the effects of Monday's stinging 12-11 rejection by the Philippine Senate of a new military base treaty with the United States. Foreign Secretary Raul Manglapus said that in the wake of the Senate action, the Aquino government has withdrawn the legal notice given to the United States in May, 1990, terminating the agreement on U.S. bases in the Philippines.
NEWS
September 16, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Philippines Senate today formally rejected a new military base treaty with the United States, plunging the Philippines into an economic and political crisis over the future of the Subic Bay Naval Base, America's last military outpost in Southeast Asia. The 12-11 vote by the Senate came a day after President Corazon Aquino announced that she will seek a national referendum to decide the base question, attempting to override the Senate action with a popular vote.
NEWS
September 14, 1991 | ABBY TAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
President Corazon Aquino, humiliated by a Senate repudiation of a 10-year military base treaty with the United States, decided Friday to call for a national referendum on the issue. The referendum--which is expected to be challenged in the Supreme Court--will coincide with the May, 1992, presidential and congressional elections, said Laticia Shahani, one of the minority 11 senators who supported the treaty and who met with Aquino at Malacanang Palace.
NEWS
September 13, 1991 | ABBY TAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A senator has called on a U.S.-Philippine committee to meet Tuesday to begin planning the withdrawal of the 93-year-old American military presence here. Edgardo Angara, one of the minority 11 senators who supported a treaty that would have allowed the United States to maintain its bases here, principally the Subic Bay Naval Base, said the new agreement, the existing version of which formally expires on Monday, "is dead. There's absolutely no way to reverse the situation.
NEWS
September 12, 1991 | ABBY TAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Philippine Senate began crucial debates on Wednesday, apparently intent on burying a military bases treaty with the United States and ending the 93-year American military presence here. An aide to President Corazon Aquino, meanwhile, said Aquino will seek a referendum to decide the bases issue if the Senate refuses to approve the pact.
NEWS
September 11, 1991 | ABBY TAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Tens of thousands of Filipinos answered President Corazon Aquino's call Tuesday for "people power" to back her efforts to pressure her nation's defiant Senate to ratify a military bases treaty with the United States.
NEWS
September 8, 1991 | From Reuters
The Philippine Senate moved Saturday to the brink of rejecting a new treaty to lease Subic Bay Naval Base to the United States, but Washington said it remains optimistic that the accord will be ratified. The treaty, which allows the United States to keep Subic Bay for another 10 years, was close to defeat after eight senators signed a resolution declaring their opposition. The pact needs 16 votes in the 23-member Senate to be ratified.
NEWS
August 28, 1991 | ABBY TAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Philippines and the United States face an uphill fight to win approval of a military bases agreement that would allow continued American use of Subic Bay Naval Base for another decade. President Corazon Aquino's government appears unable to muster the required 16 votes in the 23-member Philippine Senate to get the bases treaty--signed Tuesday by Philippine Foreign Secretary Raul Manglapus and U.S. Ambassador Frank Wisner at Malacanang Palace--ratified by Sept.
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