Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Treaties Russia
IN THE NEWS

United States Treaties Russia

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 21, 1999 | From Associated Press
The Russian government said Wednesday that it has turned down Washington's proposal to amend the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty in exchange for U.S. help in completing a major radar site. The U.S. has offered to help finish a radar installation near Irkutsk, Siberia, in exchange for renegotiating the ABM pact to allow both nations to deploy limited national missile defense systems. Vladimir O. Rakhmanin, a Russian Foreign Ministry spokesman, said Moscow was against "bargaining" on the pact.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 18, 2001 | JOHN HENDREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States' decision to withdraw from the Antiballistic Missile Treaty with Russia could threaten international stability by freeing other nations to end peace agreements, Russian Defense Minister Sergei B. Ivanov said Monday. After a meeting with Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld, Ivanov said the move would not unbalance U.S.-Russian relations.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 14, 1998 | Associated Press
After submitting an amended version of the START II arms control treaty to Russia's parliament Monday, President Boris N. Yeltsin finally appeared likely to see the 5-year-old pact ratified. The treaty, signed by Yeltsin and President Bush in 1993, would halve the strategic nuclear arsenals of the United States and Russia. The U.S. Senate ratified it in 1996, but the Duma, the lower house of Russia's parliament, so far has refused to approve it.
NEWS
August 14, 2001 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian leaders dug in their heels Monday in talks with Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld, rejecting his suggestion that the two countries abandon the 1972 treaty that precludes U.S. development of a missile defense system. "The existing, multilayered system of strategic security that exists in the world today fully meets Russian needs," Defense Minister Sergei B. Ivanov said.
NEWS
October 18, 1996 | From Associated Press
U.S. Defense Secretary William J. Perry on Thursday appealed to Russian lawmakers to approve the sweeping START II arms reduction treaty, but his audience reacted with suspicion and distrust of U.S. intentions, particularly Washington's support for NATO expansion. Perry appeared before the state Duma, or lower house of parliament, just before President Boris N. Yeltsin announced the ouster of security chief Alexander I.
NEWS
August 4, 1995 | Associated Press
Ignoring Administration warnings that it is inciting a new arms race, the Senate held fast Thursday to plans to erect a missile defense system, unilaterally altering a 1972 treaty. By a 51-49 vote, the Senate rejected a Democrat-led effort to remove language in a 1996 defense spending bill that fundamentally changes the U.S. stance toward the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty that restricts U.S. and Russian missile defenses. The Administration has threatened to veto the measure.
NEWS
December 19, 1992 | CAREY GOLDBERG and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin announced Friday that he is ready to sign a treaty with the United States to slash the nuclear arsenals of the two nations by more than two-thirds, and proposed doing so at a meeting with President Bush in Alaska next month. Yeltsin's unexpected declaration caused consternation in Washington, where American officials said they thought there was still some hard bargaining to do before an agreement could be signed.
NEWS
December 26, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin ordered his foreign and defense ministers to fly to Geneva today to try to remove the last sticking points with the United States on the most ambitious disarmament treaty in history, a Russian spokesman said. With the final days ticking off in the Bush Administration, officials in Moscow said a summit could still occur in early January but that Russia and the United States must close a deal on the arms pact first.
NEWS
December 25, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Lawrence S. Eagleburger will meet with Russia's Foreign Minister Andrei A. Kozyrev next week in Geneva to hammer out the remaining details of an agreement reducing Russian and American nuclear arsenals by about two-thirds, the State Department announced Thursday. If all goes as planned, the talks will clear the way for President Bush to sign the pact before he leaves office Jan. 20. Russian President Boris N.
NEWS
November 5, 1992 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Russian Parliament ratified the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty overwhelmingly Wednesday, easing fears that rising hard-line nationalism here would block progress in arms control. The Supreme Soviet confirmed the key U.S.-Soviet arms pact in a 157-1 vote, ignoring objections by one lawmaker that the treaty favors America and complaints by another that ratification would look like a pandering present to President-elect Bill Clinton.
NEWS
July 12, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush administration expects to withdraw from a cornerstone arms control treaty in less than two years, according to a newly prepared statement of administration policy. The document, obtained Wednesday on the eve of congressional testimony on antimissile systems, says that the administration's ambitious testing plans will conflict with the Antiballistic Missile Treaty of 1972 and thus force withdrawal from the pact "within months, not years."
NEWS
June 5, 2000 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton and Russian President Vladimir V. Putin failed Sunday to narrow their wide differences over missile defense, agreeing on the threat and disagreeing on the solution. But in a long day of summitry, they announced a pair of pacts taking the two nations yet further from the Cold War.
NEWS
May 5, 2000 | From Associated Press
President-elect Vladimir V. Putin signed the START II treaty Thursday, affirming the Russian parliament's approval of the plan to trim the nuclear arsenals of Russia and the United States, the presidential press service said. The treaty obligates Russia and the U.S. to slash nuclear stockpiles to 3,000 to 3,500 warheads each. It was approved last month by both chambers of parliament, ending seven years of deadlock.
NEWS
April 20, 2000 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a sign of the mood in Russia to sweep away the Yeltsin era and push ahead with change, the upper house of parliament voted Wednesday to dismiss the country's suspended prosecutor general and to ratify the START II treaty. Coming after an appeal by President-elect Vladimir V. Putin to dismiss Yuri I. Skuratov, the vote underscored Putin's ability to push his changes through the lower and upper chambers of the parliament.
NEWS
April 15, 2000 | MAURA REYNOLDS and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After more than seven years of discord and delay, Russia's lower house of parliament signaled a new era in U.S.-Russian relations Friday by ratifying the landmark START II arms control treaty. The treaty, which was ratified by the U.S. Senate in 1996, is the most ambitious and extensive arms control agreement between the two nuclear states, requiring each to roughly halve their arsenals by 2007.
NEWS
October 21, 1999 | From Associated Press
The Russian government said Wednesday that it has turned down Washington's proposal to amend the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty in exchange for U.S. help in completing a major radar site. The U.S. has offered to help finish a radar installation near Irkutsk, Siberia, in exchange for renegotiating the ABM pact to allow both nations to deploy limited national missile defense systems. Vladimir O. Rakhmanin, a Russian Foreign Ministry spokesman, said Moscow was against "bargaining" on the pact.
NEWS
May 29, 1992 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration plans to propose to Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin next month that the two countries join in developing a new global defense system that would provide protection from ballistic missile attacks to a large community of nations, according to a senior Pentagon official. The plan is intended as a reshaping of the old Cold War-era "Star Wars" missile shield for a new world in which Soviet missile attacks on the United States are no longer a credible threat.
NEWS
January 2, 1993 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the conclusion of the second Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty, known as START II, American arms experts are looking beyond the accord to a new, more challenging and potentially more dangerous era in arms control. President Bush and Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin may be signing a treaty that will cut U.S. and former Soviet nuclear arsenals to their lowest level since the early 1960s.
NEWS
October 17, 1999 | From the Washington Post
The Clinton administration has offered to help Russia complete a key radar site and to share more American radar data if Russia agrees to renegotiate the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty so that the United States could build a national missile defense system, a senior administration official said Saturday.
NEWS
June 21, 1999 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid a sudden rejuvenation of their nations' struggling relationship, President Clinton and Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin ordered their deputies Sunday to discuss rewriting segments of a 27-year-old treaty restricting the deployment of missile defenses. They also agreed on initial talks to reduce long-range nuclear weapons. "The two countries are back in business," Samuel R.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|